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Old 05-24-2012, 02:36 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by elkhornsun View Post
A lot of the money goes into repairing the damage done by large trucks. Anywhere there is a large lumber mill or coal mine or cement plant it is easy to spot which side of the road the loaded trucks travel down and which side they come back to the plant empty. There are places in California that like West Virginia with its massive coal trucks where the roads have to be repaired and resurfaced every single year.

I worked for Caltrans in California and the cost of a mile of highway was 20x higher to make it able to withstand the weight of fully laden trucks as compared to non-commercial vehicles. There are sections of scenic highways that parallel the main freeway used by the trucks that have not had to be resurfaced in decades as they only have car and light truck traffic.

The more truck traffic there is the higher the fuel taxes need to be to pay for the cost of both repairing existing highway sections and to straighten and level older sections to make it easier on the trucks. The 200 mile stretch of Hwy 101 from San Francisco to the Oregon border has had hundreds of millions of dollars spent to move whole mountains and fill entire valleys to straight the road and reduce the grades and this was not done to accommodate tourists or commuters.
Most damage is caused by weather.. At least in the North/Mid-west
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:55 AM   #16
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The chart is wrong. Here in Washington several years ago the voters passed a gas tax of 50 cents a gallon over the existing gas tax. WE are among hte highest in the kountry. Right now regular is $4.25 a gallon and diesel runs around $4.25 to $4.70.

We just got back from a run to Ohio and saw most diesel prices under $3.90 and dropping.

Most gas pricing on the west coast is because of the California gouging IMHO and it drops as you head east.
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Old 05-25-2012, 05:53 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by elkhornsun View Post
A lot of the money goes into repairing the damage done by large trucks. Anywhere there is a large lumber mill or coal mine or cement plant it is easy to spot which side of the road the loaded trucks travel down and which side they come back to the plant empty. There are places in California that like West Virginia with its massive coal trucks where the roads have to be repaired and resurfaced every single year.

I worked for Caltrans in California and the cost of a mile of highway was 20x higher to make it able to withstand the weight of fully laden trucks as compared to non-commercial vehicles. There are sections of scenic highways that parallel the main freeway used by the trucks that have not had to be resurfaced in decades as they only have car and light truck traffic.

The more truck traffic there is the higher the fuel taxes need to be to pay for the cost of both repairing existing highway sections and to straighten and level older sections to make it easier on the trucks. The 200 mile stretch of Hwy 101 from San Francisco to the Oregon border has had hundreds of millions of dollars spent to move whole mountains and fill entire valleys to straight the road and reduce the grades and this was not done to accommodate tourists or commuters.
Before calling for higher taxes on trucks, consider this. The average big truck pays $8959 a year in federal taxes and all together pay 12.1 Billion, that's 30.6% of taxes collected.
On the state level trucks pay (on average) $4930 a year in taxes... The average auto owner pays $397 per year, so trucks pay 35 times more in taxes the cars. Consider also that every time costs rise they are passed on to the end consumer (you and me)...
This is according to the Mackinac Center For Public Policy.
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Old 05-26-2012, 08:03 PM   #18
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The problem is not enough tax to build and maintain the highways and freeways. Government at every level collects enough money to perform the necessary task, BUT for the past 40 or so years, the beaurcarts who manage the money have siphoned off hundreds of millions of dollars to build alternative transportation projects. Otherwise known as environmental friendly transportation projects, mass transit rail projects. Does the California High Speed Rail project raise your eyebrows, if you live in California?
Check your respective state budgets and find out how much of the gas tax is used for building highways - it will not be 100%.
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Old 05-27-2012, 04:37 AM   #19
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The problem is not enough tax to build and maintain the highways and freeways. Government at every level collects enough money to perform the necessary task, BUT for the past 40 or so years, the beaurcarts who manage the money have siphoned off hundreds of millions of dollars to build alternative transportation projects. Otherwise known as environmental friendly transportation projects, mass transit rail projects. Does the California High Speed Rail project raise your eyebrows, if you live in California?
Check your respective state budgets and find out how much of the gas tax is used for building highways - it will not be 100%.

This problem is not unique to fuel taxes either, as incomes rose so did income taxes the same goes for property taxes (until recently) most properties rose in value so the taxes went up . The problem is the same, the more government takes in the more it spends and wastes .
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Old 05-27-2012, 05:57 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by CarlGeo View Post
The problem is not enough tax to build and maintain the highways and freeways. Government at every level collects enough money to perform the necessary task, BUT for the past 40 or so years, the beaurcarts who manage the money have siphoned off hundreds of millions of dollars to build alternative transportation projects. Otherwise known as environmental friendly transportation projects, mass transit rail projects. Does the California High Speed Rail project raise your eyebrows, if you live in California?
Check your respective state budgets and find out how much of the gas tax is used for building highways - it will not be 100%.
You would get really sick if you knew just how much money is siphoned off for all sorts of things that have nothing to do with roads.
As to checking the budgets once you get through the shell games and cute book keeping tricks you will find some where around 50 to 60 percent goes to roads the rest a slush fund for what ever.
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