Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > iRV2.com General Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-08-2009, 01:54 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Aguanga, CA, USA
Posts: 238
A potential danger could be propane levels building up to explosive concentrations under the RV if there's a leak. At least one should make sure the open area under the propane tanks is outside the perimeter of the bales, not within it.
__________________

__________________
jspande is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-08-2009, 01:59 PM   #16
Moderator Emeritus
 
TXiceman's Avatar


 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Oklahoma Boomers Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Full Time, TX Home Base
Posts: 17,150
Blog Entries: 21
The nice warm hay can attract little mousey type critters. I would get some of the 1/2" thick foil backed foam board and cut and fit that.

Ken
__________________

__________________
Amateur Radio Operator (KE5DFR)|Full-Time! - 2012 6.7L Ford Crew Cab Dually -2013 HitchHiker Champagne 38RLRSB - Travel with one Standard Schnauzer and one small Timneh African Gray Parrot
TXiceman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2009, 02:33 PM   #17
Member
 
The Incorrigible Dirigible's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: somewhere in Texas
Posts: 95
Many thanks for all of the feedback (and for teaching me that "hay" and "straw" are two different things!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by TXiceman View Post
I would get some of the 1/2" thick foil backed foam board and cut and fit that.

Ken
I noticed one other rig that has foam board cut to fit, as well as a couple with clear plastic sheeting used as skirting all the way around the lower section. I have two concerns with both of these setups--first, they look unsightly, or at least less aesthetically pleasing than the straw bales. Second, it can get very windy, and it seems like a good blow will tear styrofoam or plastic sheeting right off, and hang it in the trees like Charlie Brown's kite. Any thoughts?
__________________
The Incorrigible: 1995 National Dolphin 533
The Crimson Haybaler: 1993 Ford Ranger
http://www.elepent.com
The Incorrigible Dirigible is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2009, 02:34 PM   #18
Member
 
The Incorrigible Dirigible's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: somewhere in Texas
Posts: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by jspande View Post
A potential danger could be propane levels building up to explosive concentrations under the RV if there's a leak. At least one should make sure the open area under the propane tanks is outside the perimeter of the bales, not within it.
That's a good point. Will be sure to leave a small gap.
__________________
The Incorrigible: 1995 National Dolphin 533
The Crimson Haybaler: 1993 Ford Ranger
http://www.elepent.com
The Incorrigible Dirigible is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2009, 02:52 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
AFChap's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: ...hopefully on the road!
Posts: 4,717
Hay bales have great insulation value. As mentioned, there have been some experimental building done with hay bales but they do take measures to reduce or virtually eliminate the risk of fire. The hay bales are "sealed" inside non-flammable walls, and I believe treated with something too. In the 50's hay bales were very popular in trailer parks to "insulate" the bottom of trailer houses. They were/are still relatively cheap, they insulate well, and they pretty much stay where you put them. The risk is that they are highly flammable, and many trailers burned from careless smoking or what started as small minor grass fires. Without the hay bales surrounding the trailers, they would have had no damage at all. I would imagine their dropping out of use in trailer parks has something to do with insurance companies and local fire codes. At the least, you would want to check out local ordinances and the possible insurance implications if your rig was damaged due to fire while you had hay around/under it. I'm a farm kid, know that hay is cheap and that it will insulate well, and there is no way in the world I would stay in an RV with hay around it ...I wouldn't even want to be parked next to one! I would go with styrofoam panels or something along that line myself.
__________________
Paul (KE5LXU) ...was fulltimin', now parttimin'
'03 Winnebago UA 40e / '05 Honda Odyssey toad
AFChap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2009, 07:29 PM   #20
Moderator Emeritus
 
Gary RVRoamer's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Silver Springs, FL. USA
Posts: 18,073
Mice in the bales are no big deal. Mice that leave the bales for the warmth of the trailer are another story. By the way, you are likely to have that problem regardless as the weather turns cold and the mice look for a warm place for the winter. Bottom line is that you need to seal up the bottom as best you can and pay special attention to places where pipes and power cords enter the interior. Mice can squeeze through a tiny crack.
__________________
Gary Brinck
Former owner of 2004 American Tradition
Home is in the Ocala Nat'l Forest near Ocala, FL
Summers in Black Mountain, NC
Gary RVRoamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2009, 11:04 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
MtManLee's Avatar
Official iRV2 Sponsor
 
Monaco Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Utah
Posts: 611
We were in Lowes and saw some stuff that looks like aluminum foil with bubble wrap between two sheets of aluminum foil. Its a new type of insulation. We bought four rolls to go around our motor home and used the storage doors to help hold it and put rocks on the bottom to hold it from winds. These rolls came in different widths most in 25 ft lengths. I bought the 2'x25' rolls. Notice a difference the first night when our furnace did not run all night.
__________________
Lee and Fran
Holiday Rambler Vacationer
While traveling down lives paths stop to smell the flowers.
MtManLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2009, 12:06 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Ray,IN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: North America somewhere
Posts: 13,699
Hay or Straw square bales are an excellent insulation. In cold temperatures mold and mildew are no more of a problem than leaves piled up around your site. Fire danger, once the bales get wet(and they will draw moisture from the ground) they do not ignite well. Since others at your location are using them it appears to be acceptable.
DO place bales to leave the underneath portion of your propane tank exposed. DO NOT exhaust furnace fumes under the RV! RV furnaces are only 60-65% efficient, one is tempted to utilize this "wasted" exhaust heat, at possibly the expense of their families lives.
__________________
2000 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom USQ40JD, ISC 8.3 Cummins 350, Spartan MM Chassis. USA 1SG, retired;PPA,Good Sam Life member,FMCA."We the people are the rightful masters of both the Congress and the Courts - not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow men who pervert the Constitution. "Abraham Lincoln"
Ray,IN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 01:10 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
RedneckExpress's Avatar
 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Sauvie Island, OR
Posts: 2,353
Send a message via ICQ to RedneckExpress Send a message via AIM to RedneckExpress Send a message via MSN to RedneckExpress Send a message via Yahoo to RedneckExpress
Quote:
Originally Posted by MtManLee View Post
We were in Lowes and saw some stuff that looks like aluminum foil with bubble wrap between two sheets of aluminum foil. Its a new type of insulation. We bought four rolls to go around our motor home and used the storage doors to help hold it and put rocks on the bottom to hold it from winds. These rolls came in different widths most in 25 ft lengths. I bought the 2'x25' rolls. Notice a difference the first night when our furnace did not run all night.
The product is called Reflectix, its very useful. If ya want to see how well it reflects, put your hand on a piece of it and wait, you'll feel your own body heat reflecting back at your after a while.
__________________
RedneckExpress is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 07:47 AM   #24
Moderator Emeritus
 
Madame Boomer's Avatar


 
Texas Boomers Club
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Cypress, Texas
Posts: 3,567
We had friends who transferred from Texas to Wyoming just in time for the hard winter up there. They lived in their rv through the winter and for many months afterward while their home was being built.

They used haybales to insulate the outside of the rv and as I recall, they stacked them underneath and almost to the top of the rv to shield against the wind leaving ample space to ventilation.

I remember the weekly email reports from them: they were definitely cozy, a bit cloustraphobic, but never heard anything about critters. Personally, I don't see how any critter can survive a winter in Wyoming!

I know it's done regularly in colder climates, but I would definitely check out all the potential hazards before doing it.

Sandy
__________________
2000 - Texas Boomers Wagonmaster - 2017
2004 & 2008 iRV2 National Rally Wagonmaster
Life is sweet when the TEXAS BOOMERS meet!
Texas and Boomers - we just naturally go together
Madame Boomer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2009, 03:27 PM   #25
Member
 
Folis Jones's Avatar
 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Suffolk, Virginia
Posts: 36
The only problem with ducting the exhaust under the coach is the danger of carbon monoxide. I don't think anyone can be sure there are not some leaks, large or small, under any MH.

That idea sounds dangerous....

Cheers,

Folis
Suffolk, VA
__________________

__________________
Folis Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Warm in Winter? 2goldens Excel Owner's Forum 21 12-22-2007 11:30 PM
Do you keep warm in bed? unclesmirf iRV2.com General Discussion 8 11-25-2007 07:09 PM
freezer cold, refridgerator warm jdsr MH-General Discussions & Problems 30 09-03-2007 11:18 AM
Keeping warm taletellers RV'ing On A Budget 19 05-03-2006 12:09 PM
Inst panel recall-not a warm feeling al koffman Workhorse and Chevrolet Chassis Motorhome Forum 68 01-13-2006 10:56 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.