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Old 11-26-2018, 07:32 PM   #1
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How much work is this...

My wife and I are currently boating\fishing people (saltwater offshore) but it seems to be a lot of work lately. Getting ready to go the day before, towing to the location, enjoying a few hours on the water, then the whole cleanup\ put away process. Boat\engine\trailer maintenance is an expensive, time consuming task as well. We were thinking of getting out of the boat and into a towable camper for us to take weekend\week trips. Are we just swapping towables at this point? How mush work\maintenance is there to owning and using a camper?
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Old 11-26-2018, 08:21 PM   #2
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Having had both, currently have a 5th wheel I’d say the maintenance is more on a boat. Especially a salt water boat like I/you have
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Old 11-26-2018, 08:28 PM   #3
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Welcome to the forum!!


As with boating, their will always be things to do. Your trading barnacles for tree sap, cantankerous engines for picky inverters, fouled rigging for clogged dump valves. The bright side is that you will find it much easier to weather storms, be able to walk to the next campsite and sit down and talk, get out and walk around your area rather than having the same view for 360 degrees. Many of the systems have marked similarities which will make the change much easier. Anything mechanical made by humans will have issues, but not knowing boats I can't really tell you about the maintenance issues, but if you take your time and find a solid unit and be as proactive as you can about your systems, the less problems you should have.
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:02 AM   #4
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Having a life time of all types of boats, (sail, trawlers, small fishing boats), airplanes, travel trailers, fifth wheels, and motorhomes I can tell you boats take first place in PIA maintenance. As with boats, the more camper you have the more maintenance required. The scale of maintenance begins with simple small travel trailers, and ever escalates through fifth wheels to motorhomes. Don't throw you tool box away.
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:33 AM   #5
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rangran, I think there is a significant difference in "work" associated with RV ownership if you have to remotely store vs. parking at your house. We don't have any HOA restrictions and have always parked our motorhomes and car trailers at the back of our driveway. This makes it very convenient for maintenance, cleaning, and packing & unpacking. I probably would not have bought our first motorhome back in 1997 if it needed to be stored off site and potentially subject to damage. That said, many owners have no choice and must store their RV's off site and that doesn't deter them from enjoying them.

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My wife and I are currently boating\fishing people (saltwater offshore) but it seems to be a lot of work lately. Getting ready to go the day before, towing to the location, enjoying a few hours on the water, then the whole cleanup\ put away process. Boat\engine\trailer maintenance is an expensive, time consuming task as well. We were thinking of getting out of the boat and into a towable camper for us to take weekend\week trips. Are we just swapping towables at this point? How mush work\maintenance is there to owning and using a camper?
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:36 AM   #6
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Stalled engine on land vs open water or even in the air, which would you prefer? I quit flying to feel safer. Boats are good in lakes. Had all three.
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:41 AM   #7
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With a boat you have to contend with the weather and its seasonal.
In a rv just drive to warmer place all year.
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:49 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nosticks View Post
Having a life time of all types of boats, (sail, trawlers, small fishing boats), airplanes, travel trailers, fifth wheels, and motorhomes I can tell you boats take first place in PIA maintenance. As with boats, the more camper you have the more maintenance required. The scale of maintenance begins with simple small travel trailers, and ever escalates through fifth wheels to motorhomes. Don't throw you tool box away.
I agree with this 100%. You have most of the same stuff, but in a less corrosive environment. The more complicated the systems become, the more time & money you will spend on maintenance.

Our purpose in camping is to get away from it all and enjoy the outdoors. If we take fewer things, our initial investment is lower, our maintenance costs are lower and we don't have to spend time fixing it. We don't have to find room to store it and the lockers are not so full of stuff that we can't find any of it.
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:50 AM   #9
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You still have to get ready the day before, setup and tear down are similar in scope, though differing in duties. So the getting there and going home parts won't be drastically different in terms of work that needs to be done from what you have now.

Maintenance on my boats always exceeded the maintenance on the RVs.
You still need to do stuff to take care of them, and things are going to break.
But for me at least, the RVs have required less in the way of constant maintenance as compared to the boats.
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:56 AM   #10
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Its always something...boat rv plane
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Old 11-27-2018, 08:05 AM   #11
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The o.p. also has the salt to deal with..we only go in fresh water but it is still much harder than the rv stuff...no question about it in my humble opinion. We still enjoy the boat and it will be hard to say goodby but I can see it coming.
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Old 11-27-2018, 08:28 AM   #12
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I think the easiest way to RV would be in a medium sized TT trailer. During ideal camping season you could leave most of the items needed to camp with in the trailer depending on temperature. Boxed and can foods should be ok. Have extra clothes that stay in the trailer. Fill the water when you can before the next trip.
No extra drivetrain to worry about.
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Old 11-27-2018, 08:37 AM   #13
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I've bought/used/sold 12 boats that got used in salt water. Each boat that I bought had things that needed attention; some that might have caused a stranding if they hadn't been addressed. There are a lot more buttons/knobs/gaskets/engine components that all need looking at regularly.


A TT has a LOT fewer systems, so it would be a lot less R&M than a boat, IMO.
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Old 11-27-2018, 08:54 AM   #14
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Boating experience will prep you for RVing.
Only problem is similar to boating, "2 footites"
Have fun and Happy Glamping.
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