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Old 04-25-2015, 10:46 AM   #1
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Interesting tire article

The Use Of Internal Balancing Materials and/or Coolants In MICHELIN® Truck Tires


I hope this answers the questions some have about the use of alternate materials for tire balancing.


+++++++++++++++++
The Use Of Internal Balancing Materials and/or Coolants In MICHELIN® Truck Tires
(Revised)

The use of internal balancing materials and/or coolants (such as powders, liquids, gels and/or beads) in MICHELIN® Truck Tires does not automatically affect the tire warranty unless the internal balancing material and/or coolant has a high water/moisture content or that it is determined that the internal balancing material and/or coolant has adversely affected the inner liner, casing plies, or the performance of the tires.

Prior to using any type of internal balancing material and/or coolant, Michelin strongly recommends that the customer make sure the internal balancing material and/or coolant has been tested and certified by the internal balancing material and/or coolant manufacturer as being safe for use in tires. Water/moisture content testing should be included in the certification process. Any product with a water or moisture content greater than 3% as measured by the Karl Fisher Method (ASTM D6304) will automatically void any mileage, number of retreads and/or time warranty.

In addition to the forgoing, please refer to the Michelin Truck Tire Operator’s Manual and Limited Warranty (MWE40021) for a general discussion of what is and is not covered by the warranty.

NOTE: Please consult Michelin prior to using internal balancing materials and/or coolants in any MICHELIN® tires that have sensors in them. The internal balancing materials and/or coolants may adversely affect the performance of the sensors.

For additional information, please contact your local Michelin sales representative or contact Michelin using the website at Michelin Truck Tires - A better way forward.
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Old 04-26-2015, 06:18 PM   #2
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It's interesting that you posted this thread, I just purchased 4 new tires and had internal balancing material put in all six tires. The jury is still out on the after effects of this action. Sometimes it drives smooth with no vibration and sometimes I still get front end vibration. I have as of yet determined whether it is a speed issue or a tire balance issue. I am still working on that determination. Gale
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Old 04-27-2015, 09:11 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galeran View Post
It's interesting that you posted this thread, I just purchased 4 new tires and had internal balancing material put in all six tires. The jury is still out on the after effects of this action. Sometimes it drives smooth with no vibration and sometimes I still get front end vibration. I have as of yet determined whether it is a speed issue or a tire balance issue. I am still working on that determination. Gale

Gale, did you use beads or some other material?
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Old 04-27-2015, 10:34 AM   #4
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Interesting info .... thx for post up Joe .....
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Old 04-27-2015, 01:34 PM   #5
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Interesting tire article

I'm not understanding this. Is this suppose to be a superior way to balance tires, or just an alternate way? Is there something wanting in doing it the conventional way?

Again, I know nothing about this, just wondering what the point of doing it this way when it seems there is adding in the potential for tire damage, vibration, or whatever.
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Old 04-27-2015, 01:53 PM   #6
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When I had Michelin tires put on our previous coach, the tire shop owner said he loved to work with Michelin Tires because they almost always came out of the factory very well balanced. He was correct, there were very few weights added to the rim. Then he showed me a SOB truck tire and rim and I don't know how many weights he had in it but it was a lot. He said not only was the SOB tire out of balance but it didn't run straight. The tire sort of wobbled as he spun it. It was going on a coal truck and they take such a beating the owner wanted cheap tires, and it looked like that is exactly what he got.
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Old 04-27-2015, 02:03 PM   #7
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Good article Joe. Thanks for posting!!
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Old 04-27-2015, 02:38 PM   #8
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Balancing with "internal materials" is an alternative method and has one big advantage: it continues to keep the tire in balance even though the tire wears or otherwise changes its balance characteristics. You balance once for the life of the tire (assuming it never has to be dismounted for some other purpose). It's also easy for the tire shop, which is a big plus for them. But if you prefer the traditional method with weights on the wheel, go for it.

The major commercially available "internal balancing materials", e.g. Equal, Dynabeads, Counteract, etc., all meet Michelin's standards. The warning in this document is primarily for those who decide to DIY the balancing using a variety of ersatz materials, anywhere from antifreeze to golf balls. Some of the stuff is downright crazy, but tire makers have to word their warnings carefully or get flak about prohibiting innovation or DIY tire service.
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Old 04-27-2015, 02:46 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Gary RVRoamer View Post
Balancing with "internal materials" is an alternative method and has one big advantage: it continues to keep the tire in balance even though the tire wears or otherwise changes its balance characteristics. You balance once for the life of the tire (assuming it never has to be dismounted for some other purpose).

Thanks, I get the difference now.
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