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Old 07-27-2015, 01:46 PM   #1
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New tire advice

Michelin XRV's (245/70-19.5) are 9 years old, so I am ready to replace them. They are in very good condition - no cracking, but with all of the complaints about cracking I am thinking of other brands. I am thinking of Bridgestone and Continental and am looking for feedback from people with these brands. Thanks
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Old 07-27-2015, 03:25 PM   #2
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I was in your situation a month ago, but decided to go with the Michelins XZA2 through the FMCA Advantage program because it seems that most of the cracking problems was with the XRV series! We'll see!
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Old 07-27-2015, 04:37 PM   #3
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After buying a good set of Michelins for my previous RV, a Class C, and having them age out after ~4 years I decided to try Bridgestone. The tires are still on that coach 8 years later & I talked to the owner and he said they still looked good.

I put Bridgestones on my current coach. Front tires ~6 years ago with ~+45K miles on them and they still look like new. Rear tires ~4 years ago with +25K miles on them and they look new. Handling and Ride are both good.
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Old 07-28-2015, 09:55 AM   #4
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I've been running Continentals (11R22.5) for three years now and am quite pleased. Have Bridgestones on our SUV too.
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Old 07-31-2015, 03:04 PM   #5
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I did a lengthy response to a gentleman in the Ford chassis forum regarding my thoughts on going from XRVs (age replacement) to Bridgestone R268s.

I don't know if the 'Stones are in your applicable size range, but my tire swap was only a couple weeks ago and I'm still on the road post-swap, so my comments in that thread are current.

Found it, if this linking works....

235/80/22.5 Michelin XRV, Toyo, or Bridgestone Ecopia
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Old 07-31-2015, 10:23 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by bcovey View Post
Michelin XRV's (245/70-19.5) are 9 years old, so I am ready to replace them. They are in very good condition - no cracking, but with all of the complaints about cracking I am thinking of other brands. I am thinking of Bridgestone and Continental and am looking for feedback from people with these brands. Thanks
If you had them 9 years, I wouldn't switch!
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Old 08-02-2015, 06:29 AM   #7
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New Tire Advice!

Most tire manufactures will advise to change-out tires after seven years purely for safety reasons. My 2003 H.R.Vacationers had 12 years on them when I bought new replacements. That said, they looked fine with no visible cracking and my rig was garaged its whole life. If I had this to do over I would have changed them several years sooner. The reason being if you have ever seen a tire from a MH that blew out mainly from age, it can really destroy a wheel well opening. My neighbor had that happen on his diesel pusher many years ago and what it did to the wheel opening was mighty ugly.
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Old 08-04-2015, 01:15 AM   #8
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This happened to me on my diesel truck. I had Michelin's not sure as this was a few years ago and needed to replace them and was sold a set of Bridgestones, left the dealer and went for a ride about 20 miles and the truck .felt like it was on ice skates. I'd say stay with what has served you well.
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Old 08-04-2015, 01:33 AM   #9
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Most tire manufactures will advise to change-out tires after seven years purely for safety reasons.
No they don't. What they do say is to have the tires inspected yearly starting at five years.
Quote:
Michelin Technical Bulletin


Service Life for RV/Motorhome Tires

The following recommendation applies to RV/Motorhome tires. Tires are composed of various types of material and rubber compounds, having performance properties essential to the proper functioning of the tire itself. These component properties evolve over time. For each tire, this evolution depends upon many factors such as weather, storage conditions, and conditions of use (load, speed, inflation pressure, maintenance, etc.) to which the tire is subjected throughout its life. This service-related evolution varies widely so that accurately predicting the serviceable life of any specific tire in advance is not possible.

That is why, in addition to regular inspections and inflation pressure maintenance by consumers, it is recommended to have RV/Motorhome tires, including spare tires, inspected regularly by a qualified tire specialist, such as a tire dealer, who will assess the tire’s suitability for continued service. Tires that have been in use for 5 years or more should continue to be inspected by a specialist at least annually.

Consumers are strongly encouraged to be aware not only of their tires’ visual condition and inflation pressure, but also of any change in dynamic performance such as increased air loss, noise or vibration, which could be an indication that the tires need to be removed from service to prevent tire failure.

It is impossible to predict when tires should be replaced based on their calendar age alone. However, the older a tire the greater the chance that it will need to be replaced due to the service-related evolution or other conditions found upon inspection or detected during use.

While most tires will need replacement before they achieve 10 years, it is recommended that any tires in service 10 years or more from the date of manfacture, including spare tires, be replaced with new tires as a simple precaution even if such tires appear serviceable and even if they have not reached the legal wear limit.

For tires that were on an original equipment vehicle (i.e., acquired by the consumer on a new vehicle), follow the vehicle manufacturer’s tire replacement recommendations, when specified (but not to exceed 10 years).

The date when a tire was manufactured is located on the sidewall of each tire. Consumers should locate the Department of Transportation or DOT code on the tire that begins with DOT and ends with the week and year of manufacture. For example, a DOT code ending with “0304” indicates a tire made in the 3rd week (Jan) of 2004.

Toyo RV Safety

Tire Damage and Aging (Non-Commercial Use)
Vehicle operating conditions and tire maintenance practices vary widely. Tires should be routinely checked for damage or signs of fatigue or aging. This should be done at scheduled vehicle maintenance intervals and preferably on a lift so that the tires can be thoroughly inspected by a tire professional.
Tire longevity is extremely dependent on factors such as air pressure maintenance. It is recommended that tires be thoroughly examined by a tire professional after reaching five years of service. Even tires with serviceable tread remaining may require replacement prior to wearing out. Tires which have reached a remaining tread depth of 4/32nd should be replaced.
The age of your tire can be determined by reading the sidewall. Every tire has a 10 or 11 digit DOT (Department of Transportation) identifying number on one sidewall. The last 3 or 4 digits are the most important to you. Older tires have 3 digits, the first two identifying the week of manufacture and the third digit the year when the tire was made. Tires made between 1990 and 1999 may have a triangle alongside the numbers. As from January 2000 4 digits are used, the first two give the week of manufacture and the last two digits tell the year the tire was made.
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Old 08-04-2015, 08:35 PM   #10
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Tire Advice!

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Originally Posted by Mr_D View Post
No they don't. What they do say is to have the tires inspected yearly starting at five years.
Well Mr_D thank you for the info. But visual inspection by an authorized dealer can only give experienced opinion. I do know personally a relative who blew out the sidewall on 225x70x19.5 Michellin with less than five years use. The dealer who had a Michellin representative look at the tire said their was no cuts or impact damage and no obvious cracks on either side of the tire. I know I pushed my luck on my rig after twelve years but no matter how they may look great it just doesn't tell the whole story. But changing out tires sometimes prematurely just may be the cheapest insurance you'll ever purchase at least you can have peace of mine. Thanks Mr_D
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Old 08-05-2015, 02:40 PM   #11
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I have been running Toyo's for the past 9 years. Replace them after 6 years use, regardless of the appearance. A blowout could be very expensive, and just try to protect against it at all reasonable costs.
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Old 08-09-2015, 03:25 PM   #12
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Well Mr_D thank you for the info. But visual inspection by an authorized dealer can only give experienced opinion. I do know personally a relative who blew out the sidewall on 225x70x19.5 Michellin with less than five years use. The dealer who had a Michellin representative look at the tire said their was no cuts or impact damage and no obvious cracks on either side of the tire. I know I pushed my luck on my rig after twelve years but no matter how they may look great it just doesn't tell the whole story. But changing out tires sometimes prematurely just may be the cheapest insurance you'll ever purchase at least you can have peace of mine. Thanks Mr_D

If in fact it was a Run Low Flex failure or Zipper "Blowout" then tire age has almost nothing to do with the real cause of the failure. In fact the failure might have been the result of a failure of the tire valve system. i.e a leak.

The term "blowout" is about as useful to understanding the real cause of the failure as saying the 90 year old person died. Most might jump to the conclusion that the person died of "old age" when in fact it might have been in a car accident or there was an armed robbery gone bad or he ate food tainted with Botulism.
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Old 08-10-2015, 04:06 PM   #13
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Well no run low flex failure due to fact tire that failed was on left front and no indication the tire was low because there was a tire pressure monitor up front that gave no indication. So cause of failure is still from unknown origin.
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Old 08-11-2015, 11:44 AM   #14
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Well no run low flex failure due to fact tire that failed was on left front and no indication the tire was low because there was a tire pressure monitor up front that gave no indication. So cause of failure is still from unknown origin.

Ok with evidence that there was no air leak then a belt separation is most likely cause. This is based on my experience being involved with about 20k tire autopsies and inspections over 40 year career.
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