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Old 10-19-2013, 07:21 AM   #43
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I normally fuel at diesel-only islands (truck islands or truck lanes). In those cases, I don't bother to turn off the fridge (which is probably 20 feet back from the fuel nozzle).

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Old 10-19-2013, 08:53 AM   #44
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Like Rusty, I seldom shut off the frig for fueling at the diesel pimps.

Truth is gasoline vapors are heavy and will fall to the ground. Your frig pilot is 3' to 4' from the ground. There are lower ignition sources than the frig flame. You have the door switches that spark a tiny spark every time you open or close the door. Even lower to the ground is the engine starter. These units are not sealed and the do throw a lot of sparks when you start the engine.

So if you are really concerned that you will blow up the place, you need to shut down and disconnect the battery and push the rig up to the pump and then push the rig away from the pumps before you reconnect the battery...you know, just to be safe.

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Old 10-19-2013, 11:22 AM   #45
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Pale horse - your brakes are hotter than the heating coil, and the heating coil is pretty well shielded, and as others have noted, several feet off the ground.

Brake disk ignited fuel fire here: F1 1994 German GP Benneton Pit Fire - YouTube

Lots of safety stuff is sort of the 'icing on the cake". People smoke while refueling all the time, people drive crappy cars with dragging brakes, red hot catalytic converters, dragging mufflers - all the time. It usually doesn't result in a safety problem. But when it does, it's usually because something else fails and the "icing on the cake" was not there either.

Last year around this time I went to my local FBO to buy some AVGAS for the race car. Aviation pumps deliver fuel at a rate of a gallon every 4 seconds or so. I was at the 4 gallon mark on my first jug and released the handle and it stuck! I sprayed the pump area with three gallons of 100LL before I could hit the emergency shut-off switch.

If I'd been filling those jugs right next to my truck I'd probably had a toasty good time.

But in the greater scheme of things I've been driving for 38 years, probably averaged pumping gas twice a week - that's about 4,000 times at the gas pump, and that's the only pump problem I've ever had, on a pump that doesn't have backpressure cut-off like a regular automotive fuel pump. In other words, statistically insignificant.

So I try to shut off the fridge or switch to 120, and I try to keep the WH off, but if I forget, I don't feel like I've dodged a bullet either.
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Old 10-19-2013, 12:00 PM   #46
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Pale horse - your brakes are hotter than the heating coil, and the heating coil is pretty well shielded, and as others have noted, several feet off the ground.

Brake disk ignited fuel fire here: F1 1994 German GP Benneton Pit Fire - YouTube

Lots of safety stuff is sort of the 'icing on the cake". People smoke while refueling all the time, people drive crappy cars with dragging brakes, red hot catalytic converters, dragging mufflers - all the time. It usually doesn't result in a safety problem. But when it does, it's usually because something else fails and the "icing on the cake" was not there either.

Last year around this time I went to my local FBO to buy some AVGAS for the race car. Aviation pumps deliver fuel at a rate of a gallon every 4 seconds or so. I was at the 4 gallon mark on my first jug and released the handle and it stuck! I sprayed the pump area with three gallons of 100LL before I could hit the emergency shut-off switch.

If I'd been filling those jugs right next to my truck I'd probably had a toasty good time.

But in the greater scheme of things I've been driving for 38 years, probably averaged pumping gas twice a week - that's about 4,000 times at the gas pump, and that's the only pump problem I've ever had, on a pump that doesn't have backpressure cut-off like a regular automotive fuel pump. In other words, statistically insignificant.

So I try to shut off the fridge or switch to 120, and I try to keep the WH off, but if I forget, I don't feel like I've dodged a bullet either.
Your brakes might be hotter than your fridge heating AC element but I for sure can tell you "Mine are not" !
If yours are....... you might want to review and think about your braking habits!
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Old 10-19-2013, 12:12 PM   #47
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There's an easier way... If your fridge has 120 priority, just turn on the genny when approaching the station. the fridge will auto switch to 120, no open flame, and when you pull out, kill the genny, and the fridge will switch back to propane.

I have to admit, I used to forget to kill the water heater until I replaced the switch with a lighted switch. Now there's no forgetting that the WH is on.
Because it is not like the generator would backfire and they tell you to stop your engine, they do not say generator.
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Old 10-19-2013, 11:17 PM   #48
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Tell ya what pale horse - next time you get off the freeway and stop, just stick your finger through one of the holes in the rim and touch the disk or drum. I'll supply the Bactine....

My generator is diesel. I don't see a lot of diesels shutting off to refuel, and backfires are a result of either an ignition problem, a mixture problem, or rapidly dumping the throttle into a lean condition. I've not seen any of those conditions on any steady-state running generator I've ever owned or used.
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Old 10-20-2013, 06:02 AM   #49
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It depends where you're fueling up (as I said earlier). The flash point of #2 diesel is 125 degF while the flash point of gasoline is -45 degF. The flash point of a chemical is the lowest temperature where enough fluid can evaporate to form a combustible concentration of gas. So if I'm fueling at a diesel only island, the possibility of combustible vapors being present is insignificant.

For reference, see HERE.

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Old 10-20-2013, 07:41 AM   #50
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I am like you Rusty, I always fuel at the big truck fuel island. As someone posted there a lot of other things that are going to ignite gas vapors at a gas station than a fridge flame 4-5' off the ground. As with everything disscussed on here..... to each thier own. If it makes you feel safer, by all means shut everything you can think of down for your safty, just do what ever works for you. If you think your brakes are to hot before stopping for gas or if you smell them, orrrrrr if you have burned the tip of your finger checking you discs or drums, I would sit off the side of the road for a bit and let them cool down before pulling in and pumping gas. I think we all do as much as we can to be safe in our everyday travels and we learn something everyday. Be safe and enjoy your travels!
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Old 10-20-2013, 08:06 AM   #51
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Fact is that most all Diesel Pushers have a Ignition shutoff wired in the Fridge, which shuts the fridge off for 20 min after the Ignition switch is turned off.
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Old 10-20-2013, 08:24 AM   #52
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Quote:
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Fact is that most all Diesel Pushers have a Ignition shutoff wired in the Fridge, which shuts the fridge off for 20 min after the Ignition switch is turned off.
Hmm... Wonder if mine is broken, or my green light on fridge is stuck.
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Old 10-20-2013, 05:49 PM   #53
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For reference, see HERE.

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Rusty,

Thanks for the Engineers Toolbox link, its a really nice reference source to have. I have added it to my bookmarks.
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