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Old 08-08-2011, 07:51 PM   #15
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Rusty, I'm sorry to keep bugging you, I forgot to ask you what size you went with, and how much of a difference heighth and width are the 17.5" versus the 16".
Mustang652, glad that I could be of help.

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Old 08-08-2011, 07:55 PM   #16
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215/75R-17.5. They are 0.3" shorter in diameter than the G614s (30.5" versus 30.8") and narrower as well (215 mm versus 235 mm), so no fitment problems at all.

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Old 08-08-2011, 08:07 PM   #17
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I am on the six year plan. When they hit six they get replaced. So far no problems. The last tires I had any problems with were michelins which are supposed to be the best, that was on one of my cars. The only rule I go by when buying is to get ones made in USA and to insist they not be any older than 90 days. Last tires I bought were firestones, no problems.
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Old 08-08-2011, 10:42 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Franka548 View Post
The dealer said that Michelin was on the 4 year replacement also.

Frank
Not so, here's Michelins statement:
Michelin Technical Bulletin
May 15, 2006

Service Life for RV/Motorhome Tires

The following recommendation applies to RV/Motorhome tires. Tires are composed of various types of material and rubber compounds, having performance properties essential to the proper functioning of the tire itself. These component properties evolve over time.

For each tire, this evolution depends upon many factors such as weather, storage conditions, and conditions of use (load, speed, inflation pressure, maintenance, etc.) to which the tire is subjected throughout its life. This service-related evolution varies widely so that accurately predicting the serviceable life of any specific tire in advance is not possible.

That is why, in addition to regular inspections and inflation pressure maintenance by consumers, it is recommended to have RV/Motorhome tires, including spare tires, inspected regularly by a qualified tire specialist, such as a tire dealer, who will assess the tire’s suitability for continued service. Tires that have been in use for 5 years or more should continue to be inspected by a specialist at least annually.

Consumers are strongly encouraged to be aware not only of their tires’ visual condition and inflation pressure, but also of any change in dynamic performance such as increased air loss, noise or vibration, which could be an indication that the tires need to be removed from
service to prevent tire failure.

It is impossible to predict when tires should be replaced based on their calendar age alone. However, the older a tire the greater the chance that it will need to be replaced due to the service-related evolution or other conditions found upon inspection or detected during use.

While most tires will need replacement before they achieve 10 years, it is recommended that any tires in service 10 years or more from the date of manufacture, including spare tires, be replaced with new tires as a simple precaution even if such tires appear serviceable and even
if they have not reached the legal wear limit.

For tires that were on an original equipment vehicle (i.e., acquired by the consumer on a new vehicle), follow the vehicle manufacturer’s tire replacement recommendations, when specified (but not to exceed 10 years).

The date when a tire was manufactured is located on the sidewall of each tire. Consumers should locate the Department of Transportation or DOT code on the tire that begins with DOT and ends with the week and year of manufacture. For example, a DOT code ending with “0304” indicates a tire made in the 3rd week (Jan) of 2004.
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Old 08-09-2011, 03:43 AM   #19
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It may seem extreme to some, but we replace our tires every two years on the TT and every third year on the truck; it costs around $800.00 to change out either set, and the cost versus risk of an accident is not worth running the risk. We, in turn, because our tires are not worn out, get some of the money back by selling the old ones to a "local area" week end camper.

BTW, we run Firestone Transforce HT on the truck, and Hi-Run (Chinese) on the TT. We were in Texas last year @ Palo Duro Canyon........air temps of 115 degrees, zero issues with the Hi-Runs, and will purchase again when needed. I think maybe one of our keys is having a good relationship with a reputable commercial tire dealer, and not an "automotive" store.
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Old 08-09-2011, 05:03 AM   #20
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Trailers just seam to have tire issues, had a 5th wheel tire tire problems, 24' car trailer tire problems. I went back to non radial tires way less tire problems, little rougher ride but way less problems. Did that on the trailers at work as well (over 100) way better service than radials. As other posters have said most RV trailer tires are running at max load all the time, additionally they get drug over curbs, off the right shoulder of the road and scrubbed sideways when backing up in to tight places as well. It would be nice if trailers builders would put heavy enough axles under the trailers to begain with, but thats not going to happen might cost them another couple of bucks.
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Old 08-09-2011, 06:16 AM   #21
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The RV Trailers all drive way too fast. What I see on the road is just hairaising. Always 10 - 20 % over the speed limit. They pass me even when driving my car. No wonder, that the tires do not last.

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Old 08-09-2011, 07:32 AM   #22
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The RV Trailers all drive way too fast. What I see on the road is just hairaising. Always 10 - 20 % over the speed limit.
That's a pretty broad brush you're painting with, isn't it? My Goodyear G614 failures occurred at ~62 MPH (speed limit of 70 on the Interstates where the failures took place). The tire is rated for 75 MPH. Speed isn't the only factor in 5th wheel tire failures, I can assure you. All too many times, OEM tire selection is marginal at best in terms of load capacity, and the tires selected too often have their own design/manufacturing problems as well.

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Old 08-09-2011, 07:43 AM   #23
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Hi Rusty, no..... they just drive too fast. I'm not talking about your tire troubles. The Pick-Ups that pull TT's are just too powerful. I have not passed a TT when driving the speed limit. Here in the Lower Mainland along Highway # 1 the RV's use it as a Racetrack Your other points are right on.
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Old 08-09-2011, 05:48 PM   #24
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Rusty, I agree with you on the broad paint, I was running between 62 and 65 when mine blew, I make my time up with the less fuel stops and the less slow down pulling hills. I drove over the road for 3 years and drive straight truck local now, so I very seldom speed, you cannot stop on a dime. I'm running about 24,000# gross and I know you are at least that if not a bit higher. I would guess the ones he is talking about are the weekenders that tow a trailer a couple times a year, usually for short distances. I have seen some very nasty accidents from too fast and to small a TV.

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Old 08-10-2011, 10:34 AM   #25
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One of the problems with trailer tires is that many are made in China and are junk. I swapped out Chinese Missions for Bridgestones and the problems stopped. A recommendation to change tires every four years is a tire dealer trying to drum up business. Same thing for a quicky lube place saying you need to change oil every 3,000 miles.
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Old 08-10-2011, 06:16 PM   #26
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One of the problems with trailer tires is that many are made in China and are junk. I swapped out Chinese Missions for Bridgestones and the problems stopped

Many are, but all are not; the best tire tip I can give is to stay away from "retail" and automotive stores. Instead find a good commercial tire dealer and build a relationship........they are not franchises, nor are they "company stores". I run Hi-Runs (Chinese) on our TT because MY tire dealer recommended them; and so far, they have been excellent tires. I do understand there is cheapy stuff coming from overseas, but all of it is not junk. Irregardless of who makes the product you are buying......SMART BUYING is the key. And for me, a good tire dealer is worth his weight in gold when it comes to commercial tires for RV's

BTW, Bridgestone is a Japanese Company that also owns Firestone...hence their name Bridgestone-Firestone Corporation. They have a major plant about ten miles from us, an all of the quality control policy is Japanese controlled not USA.
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Old 08-10-2011, 08:19 PM   #27
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BTW, Bridgestone is a Japanese Company that also owns Firestone...hence their name Bridgestone-Firestone Corporation. They have a major plant about ten miles from us, an all of the quality control policy is Japanese controlled not USA.
Japanese companies assembling their products in this country don't automatically become "Made in USA" companies - their design, specifications, assembly and PROFITS are all still offshore in nature and benefit - a Honda is STILL a "Japanese" vehicle - regardless of WHERE it is actually put together, USA or otherwise - the only local area to benefit is the labor involved in putting all the foreign-made parts together...

Reality: At least in my own experience related to tires, the Japanese stuff we have bought and used have been every bit as good as the actual "Made in USA" stuff - we have them on 2 RV's, wife's Ford and my Dodge - no regrets...
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Old 08-10-2011, 10:49 PM   #28
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Japanese companies assembling their products in this country don't automatically become "Made in USA" companies - their design, specifications, assembly and PROFITS are all still offshore in nature and benefit - a Honda is STILL a "Japanese" vehicle - regardless of WHERE it is actually put together, USA or otherwise - the only local area to benefit is the labor involved in putting all the foreign-made parts together...

Reality: At least in my own experience related to tires, the Japanese stuff we have bought and used have been every bit as good as the actual "Made in USA" stuff - we have them on 2 RV's, wife's Ford and my Dodge - no regrets...
Honda (as do others) make a LOT of their parts in the US and they are then assembled here too so the local market does get a benefit.
Some time ago the state of WA went on a "Buy American" kick. We could no longer buy Dodge vans because they didn't have enough US made parts, BUT we could get Toyota PU's!
Bet you dislike Michelin too because they're French!

But:
Employees
United States 17,000

Michelin U.S. employment by state
South Carolina 7,930
Alabama 2,070
Oklahoma 1,820
Indiana 1,600
North Carolina 710
Kentucky 350
Georgia 200

Michelin plants by product type
Greenville, S.C. car tires
Spartanburg, S.C. truck and bus tires
Lexington, S.C. car tires
Lexington, S.C. earthmover tires
Sandy Springs, S.C. semi-finished products
Starr, S.C. semi-finished products
Duncan, S.C. truck tire retreading
Covington, Ga. tread pressing
Norwood, N.C. aircraft tires
Dothan, Ala. car and light truck tires
Tuscaloosa, Ala. car and light truck tires
Louisville, Ky. synthetic rubber
Fort Wayne, Ind. car and light truck tires
Ardmore, Okla. car and light truck tires

Tax contributions $24.6 million
Total capital investment $6.2 billion
Goods purchased annually $134 million
Jobs created outside Michelin (private economy) 35,550

They also had a plant in the US in the early 1900's
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