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Old 08-16-2011, 01:21 PM   #29
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Again if you go with one of the freeze dried long term food programs....the food is not too bad.......Camping World sells one called "Stay-a-while"....

NOTE: There are also "Extend-a-flow"......... I like the extend-a-stay better as it lets you use the portable tank to feed the furnace....
Had pretty well come to the decision to start with a several day two person supply of the dehydrated foods. Got to sample an MRE at an AF Security Police reunion and years ago while in RVN, with the exception of the scrambled egg and ham, I learned to eat and enjoy most of the C rations. Made a pocket size stove out of a bisqcuit can and sterno. Under the circumstances of eat this or go hungry, you're prone to eat what ya' have.

On the propane tank issue, Thanks, I have the a CW version to use on the portable tanks in the RV and need to get another to keep here at the house. It's the main tanks on the RV I want to tap into and I like your suggestion of the "extend-a-stay" better. Being able to tap into the tanks and also feed back to RV's system is a darn good idea. I think that is what I see at places that have extended stay RVs with the large tanks placed beside the unit.
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Old 08-16-2011, 06:34 PM   #30
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Regarding medicines, we are most likely all in the same situation. My medical insurance is nation wide, being retired military. I am thinking that in a situation where I had to leave Dodge quickly, and my medicine supply was close to being filled, I would not hesitate to go. Upon arriving at a new destination I could check in with any doctor, take my old prescription bottle in with me, explain the situation, and most likely the would write a new prescription to carry me through the time. Yes, maybe I would have to pay the doctor if my insurance did not cover it, but most are human beings, and upon medical examination they can write a prescription.

There are alternatives to solutions in life. One just needs to stop and think about them and how to go about solving them. I don't think anything is so complicated in our lives that we could not survive if we can originally avoid the disaster.

I'm an optimist. (until it goes wrong)
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Old 08-16-2011, 07:20 PM   #31
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NOTE: There are also "Extend-a-flow" Which lets you tap the main tank for the grill, but on a Motor home with fixed tanks I like the extend-a-stay better as it lets you use the portable tank to feed the furnace.. I've had to do this a time or two.
Have found this since I posted earlier and this answers all the questions I had on the "extend" connections.


RV Today Archive - Extended Stay Kit - YouTube
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Old 08-16-2011, 08:46 PM   #32
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Be sure to stock up on TP. No one ever mentions it...but we all need it!
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Old 08-16-2011, 09:38 PM   #33
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Be sure to stock up on TP. No one ever mentions it...but we all need it!
I'm past half way of reading "A Second After" and the town is coming to the realization about the importance of sanitary paper in general. It will be interesting to see what they do about that.

I don't know about anyone else but I've never really measured how much TP gets used either in our house or in the RV. I'm not sure that I would understand what a 30 day supply looks like.
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Old 08-16-2011, 09:50 PM   #34
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There are alternatives to solutions in life. One just needs to stop and think about them and how to go about solving them. I don't think anything is so complicated in our lives that we could not survive if we can originally avoid the disaster.

I'm an optimist. (until it goes wrong)
In general, Wayne, I agree with you. But if you sit down and think about it, disasters have severity. Most of us think about tornados when doing emergency planning. We've had several here in our town but the pictures of the devastation from other locations demonstrate that we really haven't come close to "the big one." How big it is, how close it is, how long it is on the ground and what it hits during that period all come to play in how complicated dealing with the aftermath gets to be. In some disasters, you may not even break a sweat. In others, sweating would be the lest of the outcomes.

The seminar that we attended showed a very interesting picture. It was a triangle with "physical stuff" at the top point and "mental preparedness" and "training" on the other two corners. What the speaker was trying to say was that a lot of emergency planning lies in the two bottom points, not the physical stuff. He had a good quote from David Grossman to go with that chart. So it is thinking about things in advance and training to do them that provide the biggest benefits.
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Old 08-17-2011, 09:04 PM   #35
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Interesting thread. I can't help but recall an old disaster movie where the family took their TT and camped out in the woods far away from the city which was in ruins.

Here in Michigan, no hurricanes or tsunamis or floods, I am possibly downwind of a reactor. We are just 30 miles from Flint which until recently, had the record for the most deaths from a single tornado, although we are definitely not in tornado alley. We do have ice storms and a repeat of the great power outage is possible. Frankly, the one in the back of my mind springs from the recent movie (docu-drama?) about the Yellowstone caldrea and it's potential as a possible super volcano. Part of the movie dealt with evacuations and effect on the world climate. Scary stuff. I'll worry about if it ever happens. Run to the store and stock up like everyone else and then hit the road and head south. Or just stay put and kiss my behind goodby.

Kind of like thinking about winning the big lotto for $200 million. What would you do?

I do have an electrical hookup that allows me to run 240 volt/20 amps back to the house so I can feed it with a 7 kw generator with 80 gallons of fuel.
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Old 08-18-2011, 01:58 AM   #36
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Different way of looking at it...

Tried this idea on a different forum. So far, I think the thread has had more reads and comments than any other by a way-long shot, so disaster preparedness is something lots of us think about. Thanks for bringing it up here.

I call such situations "onions", and try to solve the problems by peeling back the skins, one at a time. Starting with the outermost skin, I see 'where do I have to go' when shtf. That's even before food, water, fuel. A full camper has minimal value if all you can do is run the length of your driveway.

You need a place, actually several places you can go to and be safe. Places to go, dependent on the situation, ought to be priority one. Also, don't be 'mad maxxed' into thinking isolation as your best bet. Best is to accumulate lots of rv buddies, lots and lots, and collectively work out several potential meeting places scattered all around the country. Of all the folks I've met, rv-ers are the group I'd most trust with my life. Large groups will have the most chance for survival in any situation.

The second layer is to 'know when to run'. It's true, the early bird gets the worm. If you wait until you are 'sure' it's coming, everyone else will also be there clogging the roads. Step back a bit and consider taking a short, early 'vacation', maybe even heading towards one of the meeting places. If you are retired, this may be easier than if you are still attached to some responsibility. But do this well in advance of the actual onslaught.

The third layer is to have mapped out as many routes and alternatives as you can. With everyone having a pc, mapping a decision tree at every intersection from here to there might not be too bad, and such may well save your life someday.

The fourth layer is made up of thoughts. Think about how long you might want to stay alive. I hear folks talk about food for 72 hours, a week, a month... but then what? Do you just roll over and die after that point?

This fourth layer is the one that tells you to quit naming the disaster you are preparing for. Whatever the worst one is for you, you won't be prepared for it if you focus on naming it. Better to plan on how to live away from s&b for a month, six months, 10 years etc. Then supply yourself with whatever it would take to survive that long. You'd be surprised at how many individual 'named' disasters you will cover if you are simply ready for a month, or a year 'on vacation'.

The fifth layer is power. You will have to decide how much power your lifestyle requires, and how little you could live on if necessary. A good set of batteries with solar and wind and other types of replenishment are required, but you also need to know how to re-distribute your available power to essentials-only applications. Your genny will suck up the fuel in no time flat. Your propane will get you thru just so-many days and nights of comfort. In the woods, maybe kindling is plentiful for cooking and heating, but if you aren't in the woods?

Power is something you may want to do some serious experimenting with. Go boondocking a few times, even if it's only in the back yard. See exactly what you could live with or without, if it became necessary.

The sixth layer is tools. Carrying the RIGHT set of tools can make or break you. Big stuff to do mh fixes, but don't forget the teenie tools for fixing broken eyeglasses, and the middle stuff for building a shelter, chopping firewood, or cutting off an infected body part.

The rest of the layers are concerned with the types of supplies to lay in. Other posts have covered these things quite well, so I won't elaborate. Only thing I'll add is, bring cash, and lots and lots of it. The one you didn't think could possibly happen to you might just shut down the banking systems as well. Then where will you be holding a handful of plastic?

In short, prioritize your needs, and NEVER underestimate the ability of life to ruin your day.

am
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Old 08-18-2011, 07:25 AM   #37
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OP, are you running for office??? If not, then fudge the politically correct BS.

The phrase 'politically correct' was created by the politicians for the politicians as code to help them avoid saying anything that might be considered controversial so they wont take a risk with their quest to gain power.

Never is the question asked about if the statement is true or false. The only question that comes to the mind of the lying rhetoricians is...how will it affect my poll numbers!

As far as not being a prepper?

Too bad, our world is going downhill at an alarming pace. I've prepped best I can for the last few years. Now am just enjoying life and sucking down the crude while it is still flowing.

Sure, RV can make good escape pods / BOV's. Much better than a car. The worst ones may be the RV's with the least mobility. But whatever we got we use.

Here is a good forum for anyone interested in this topic.

Survivalist Forum Survival Gear Reviews and Self Sufficiency Articles
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Old 08-18-2011, 08:36 AM   #38
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Allegroman, I appreciate your perspective.

When I started this thread, I didn't want it to turn fatalistic - and I still don't. To me, the most likely disasters are things that we can handle fairly easily with limited planning. I didn't include the things that I'm doing to ride through a disaster at home because I wanted to focus this thread on the extensions to the home planning where the RV would help.

I just finished reading "A Second After" last night and judge it to be the most depressing book I've ever read. I'm not sure that any of us could prepare for the scenario that the book presents. I'm going to have to think and pray long and hard over it. There are too many things that are already happening today in our society that bear more than a casual resemblance to things that happen in that book.

Let's continue to focus on ways to use an RV as part of a mufti-faceted emergency plan. I suspect that there are some more variations on short and intermediate planning. Let's leave the TEOTWAWKI scenarios for a different thread.

Thanks,

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Old 08-19-2011, 03:25 AM   #39
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I know what you are saying, chas. But in defense, I still think too many of us have significantly narrowed our preparedness to the point of minimal value. The reason we prepare is to gain peace of mind, right? So why not have the fullest peace possible?
We can read the med books and come away totally depressed at all the crap that could happen to the human body. Or, as I suggest, we can get all the required vaccinations, then set it aside knowing we are really prepared for the worst.
Being prepared means getting prepared, not necessarily living a life in fear. Fooling myself that I have a dozen clean unders and a case of purina for Roscoe is enough doesn't make it for me. Also, getting prepared isn't an all at once or even an every day thing. It's just a medium range goal I think we all should have. My point is, be prepared for a time-length, not an specific situation.
Again, thanks for bringing it up.
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Old 08-19-2011, 08:35 AM   #40
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I know what you are saying, chas. But in defense, I still think too many of us have significantly narrowed our preparedness to the point of minimal value. The reason we prepare is to gain peace of mind, right? So why not have the fullest peace possible?
We can read the med books and come away totally depressed at all the crap that could happen to the human body. Or, as I suggest, we can get all the required vaccinations, then set it aside knowing we are really prepared for the worst.
Being prepared means getting prepared, not necessarily living a life in fear. Fooling myself that I have a dozen clean unders and a case of purina for Roscoe is enough doesn't make it for me. Also, getting prepared isn't an all at once or even an every day thing. It's just a medium range goal I think we all should have. My point is, be prepared for a time-length, not an specific situation.
Again, thanks for bringing it up.
am
We are in agreement about planning in many areas. I've also concluded that it is a time dependent thing.

I'm also a firm believer in Kaizen. That principal is based on "continuous improvement." I believe that planning is not a result but a journey.

Accordingly:
1. If I have no plans today and can plan for a week by tomorrow, that is an improvement. For me, personally, to accomplish a week (and here I'm not talking about the RV), I've decided to have a generator to make my own electricity. You are right about have a few pair of underwear and some dog food doesn't get the job done.
2. As you point out, there needs to be some testing involved. In the seminar that I attended, the speaker recommended a "flip the breaker weekend" where you throw the main breaker on your house and try to live the rest of the weekend. You'll learn some things and can recover if need be by flipping the breaker back. For the RV and boon docking, a similar test might be a way to start.
3. Personally, I cannot wrap my head around the "One Second After" circumstances. I do not know where to start thinking about it, let alone planning for it.

I see a parallel in self defense. I can study it, practice it and improve my odds. Adding weapons to the mix further improves my chances for survival but each of those comes with a learning and practice curve. At the end of the day, however, if I'm set upon by a group of trained men with automatic weapons, no planning and practice is likely to help me.

I've personally set a goal for my family to be able live for 30 days. That requires a lot more planning that I've done today. I suspect that my planning will be altered as I do some more testing. When I've reached that point, I may have a better handle on longer term planning, though I still believe that is a whole different level.

My goal for this thread was not to drive people off by getting them wrapped up in a doomsday scenario. I believe that we can all do a better job towards self-sufficiency and if we can use our RVs a part of a solution to that, so much the better. I wanted to share ideas for how to go about that, yours included.

If I learned nothing else from reading "One Second After", it was that we need to keep core moral values as a basis for our actions. For me, that isn't as easy as it sounds. My religion teaches some principals that seem to be contradictions to this whole planning process and I am working through that thinking, too. For many of us, that kind of soul searching doesn't come over night.
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Old 08-19-2011, 03:37 PM   #41
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You hit it right on the head, Chas.
I see one thing, tho, about folks in general, and the observation probably goes way deeper than this current topic. It is that when you start a conversation, many will begin the inner movie-show and have both sides of the talk already played out in their minds. re: discussion about self-preparedness automatically becomes predictions of doomsday. Sorry, but that's not exactly what we were saying, yet that's what they believe they heard. Is this the 'sheeple' principle in action? They are programmed by big media to respond in certain ways to some trigger word or phrase?

I like what you have said, as they say, it 'resonates'. To make the transition to inner peace, consider this: all of it is the journey. if you aren't able to find something in it to enjoy, don't be there. Case in point... two weeks ago I fell off my roof during a pressure cleaning job. Fell about 7 ft flat on my left side. Pelvis, hip, ribs, elbo, shoulder all sustained injury. Lots of skin still hanging from the rain gutter, unless the birds got it. Two weeks, and it still hurts like hell. I don't get but an hour or two sleep each nite. But at 66, I did learn one thing from it... I ain't the kid I thought I was!
Back to my point, I've turned this into a learning experience. I now am eating bkfst at 6am, enjoy the sunrises, take my time cleaning the house, spend more time with my 6 dogs and 8 cats, nap in the mh several times a day, and all stuff I really didn't do before in my rush to wait until tomorrow.
So, ya just gotta learn to enjoy it, even when it hurts. And ya just become prepared, a bit each day, just like you said.
One parting notion, maybe it'll have meaning, maybe not:
reality is what it is, without regard to who we are, what we are, or what we believe to be true. We do not create reality, it creates us.
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Old 08-20-2011, 10:54 PM   #42
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Back on the track of trying to use the RV as part of an overall preparedness plan, I attended another in a series of meetings on this subject sponsored by a political action group. I find it just a little bizarre that these folks would be so heavily into this topic but I'm certainly greatfull for them setting up this opportunity for me.

First, I have no affiliation with this vendor. I'm not even a customer yet. But I was more than surprised by what I saw ...and tasted.
Online Catalog

They opened up some of their containers and prepared a variety of dishes for us. There was a soup, chicken salad, corn muffins and just plain fruit. The difference between their stuff and some of the more traditional hiking meal packets is that it freeze dried, not dehydrated. The hostess served cups with a slice of dehydrated pinapple and the freeze dried version. The taste was remarkably better in the 2nd version.

The impressive part is that some of the stuff is good for 25 years if the can remains sealed. After it is opened, it is good for up to a year.

Costs seem reasonable. The only drawback that I could find is that the food is best stored at between 70-75 degrees F. That means no unconditioned garages. I have the perfect solution - simply keep moving the RV to where it is 75 degrees! Storage outside of that range doesn't affect the usefulness of the food but it may affect the taste. One thing for sure - the containers take up a whole lot less space than traditional food containers.

They had other emergency items besides food there, too, and those prices also seemed in line with what I've seen from other sources.
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