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Old 08-21-2011, 01:26 AM   #43
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Something to consider for the next week if you live in Florida or the Gulf Coast, some computer models are pointing to newly formed Tropical Storm Irene becoming a major hurricane by the middle of next week. From the forecast discussion:

THE CURRENT TRACK TAKES THE SYSTEM OVER THE SPINE OF CUBA BETWEEN 72 AND 96 HOURS...SO LITTLE INTENSIFICATION IS EXPECTED DURING THAT TIME...WITH SOME STRENGTHENING EXPECTED NEAR THE END OF THE PERIOD AFTER IRENE MOVES AWAY FROM LAND. IT IS WORTH NOTING THAT THE MODELS THAT SHOW LESS LAND INTERACTION...SUCH AS THE GFDL OR HWRF...HAVE IRENE BECOMING A MAJOR HURRICANE...AND THAT IS NOT OUT OF THE QUESTION ESPECIALLY IF THE STORM MOVES ON THE FAR LEFT OR RIGHT SIDE OF THE FORECAST CONE AND AVOIDS SIGNIFICANT LAND INTERACTION.

How are the items on your hurricane list?

National Hurricane Center
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Old 08-21-2011, 01:57 PM   #44
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"The third layer is to have mapped out as many routes and alternatives as you can. With everyone having a pc, mapping a decision tree at every intersection from here to there might not be too bad, and such may well save your life someday." That works now, when there is no disaster, but might not work then when there is one. Paper maps, while not as up-to-date as a computer or gps, have the advantage of not requiring any power other than the light necessary to see them. We make a habit of stopping at the first rest area we come to when we enter a state for the first time that year and get a new map.
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Old 08-21-2011, 08:51 PM   #45
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David, I guess the idea is to do more than just make a point-a-to-point-b game plan, with only one route laid out. Whether you use a paper map or a computer, it's all the same... plan in advance for some obstruction in route x and know where you might detour and still be heading in the right direction. Do it repeatedly all along the proposed main route. It's a lot easier if you think of it as a game.... the zombies are after you! Where to go?????
am
ps forgot this part of your question: Power... you do plan on running the motor home on this journey? Most have power to run at least a laptop, at least for short periods of time. Paper maps still good idea, however.
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Old 08-21-2011, 09:46 PM   #46
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I am a prepper of sorts, more, I am someone who simply learned the way of life that was America, when most people had a 3-6 month supply of food always on hand, and I learned this from someone who will always be smarter then me, my beloved great grand mother and maybe I can share some useful tips that she taught me.

List of Importance in any Bug Out type situation

1. Water
It is possible to set up a cistern by having a blow up pool on the roof of your RV to catch rainfall, and a hose as a siphon directed into the water tank. Some of these blow up pools will last years of kids abuse, they can be purchased for $50 at Wal-Mart etc

Filtration for Water - A berkey Water Filter System is the very best, these are gravity feed filtration systems and come in many sizes and can filter pond water into water that I would rather drink then any plastic bottled water, so filtering any tap water or cistern water would produce and has produced water that after tasted, will make it very difficult to go back to the so-called spring water in the bottle.

2. Food.
Freeze Dry foods are made and marketed by several very reputable companies, most come in #10 cans and are made to last minimum 30 years without missing a beat, and as fussy as I am about food, these foods are the gourmet of long term storage foods.
It is possible to carry enough for a family of 4 for 3 months taking up a space in one section of a Motor Home Basement, and are easy and quick to prepare, usually only requiring a hot plate and some water. A case of 6 #10 cans is enough to feed one person for many weeks and weighs anywhere from 6 to 15 pounds depending on the item.
Some of the very best sources are:

The Freeze Dried Guy
Mountain House
Honeyville
Emergency Essentials
eFoods Direct

4. Fuel: and we'll limit this to diesel for safety
Simply said, just have a way to be able to safely store as much fuel as your RV tanks hold by always having those fuel container available and filled in the garage or better, outside storage shed.
I myself always keep 8 6 gallon containers of diesel as my emergency backup.

5. Security
Some people really do hate firearms, and we can all respect that, and then we get into that worn out old argument, democrats and republicans.
Well, that's kind of silly, as my neighbor, who is a liberal by every degree, has voted for every anti-gun politician I the state of CT but strangely enough, has several old but working shotguns leaning in every corner of his home.
Why, because he says, "I want to be able to have that "option" to be able protect my loved ones, until help arrives or in the likely case that help will not arrive on time.
You don't need an armory, a simple legally owned, cheap shotgun and a box of shells and I strongly advise, a top training course by a professional is a must and can often be a wonderful way to meet great people.

6. Prepared Routes out of town
Always have several routes planned in order to "get out of dodge", and take the time to drive these routes by car if need be, in order to familiarize yourself with fuel and food stops as well as possible pull over areas to do repairs or take a nap, and remember to mark out lakes, ponds and streams where if you have a berkey and some purification tablets, are good sources for water in need.
REMEMBER though, if a scenario like this occurs and you do have to “get out of Dodge”, you need to be the first one on the road or be able to take alternate routes away from traffic, as roads will be clogged.

7. Communications

Very important, you must have a way to both communicate with family or friends that you either wish to hook up with or with the people you plan on driving to, and you need a way to keep up on the news.
CB radio is OK for short distance, Cell Phones are great for all distances, but in a situation like Katrina, cell phones proved unreliable and in many cases were completely useless.
I’m not one of those preppers who wants to see doom and gloom in our future, but the US Government has been warning us about all of the possibilities for years, and the world is a mess, our economy is on the verge, so whatever is available, Ham radio, sat phones or a wire with two cans, communications are one of the most important considerations of all.

There are many more extreme preparations that many Rvers I know have, some even have radiation detection, gas masks and even Night Vision that you can purchase at Wal-Mart, but I tend to want to have an extra bag or two of charcoal for my cookout, an extra case of wine or beer, and perhaps my collection of Law and order.

Don't feel ashamed to be one of those ultimate preppers, it's ok to be completely prepared, but even during a bug-out, what's the point if your not having fun?

My last bit of advice, is to always consider having some extra to give to someone in need, this can be the most powerful tool to survival in these situations, or, mind you, could also open the door to your ruin.
Each situation must be well thought out, certainly that family with children down the road from you who obviousily need food or water, if you offered to them could create an ally on your trek out of dodge, on the other hand, there are eliments of society that it is better to avoid and offering help to someone of that nature could literally open the door to an unpleasant road trip at the very least.
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Old 08-21-2011, 10:39 PM   #47
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We live in wildfire country, so we are consider the RV as our home away from home if needed. We usually have close to a week or more worth of food that could go quickly into the rig. I keep it close to full of fuel and at least half full of water.

We had a flood from a broken water filter in our house back in December, so used the Coach as our kitchen for about 6 weeks. We slept upstairs in the house. If we had not had an RV, we would have needed to get a motel, so that worked out well. Several years ago, we had a 4 day power outage. I was able to provide power to the freezer so we didn't ruin our food. Again, we slept in the house so I could keep the woodstove going. Our plans are not detailed, but we definitely consider the RV an important part of our emergency response.
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Old 08-22-2011, 04:57 AM   #48
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Unless I missed it, no one has mentioned options other than the RV. I also own 2 SUV's with four wheel drive. In weather-related emergencies, that would probably be a better option to get around fallen trees, etc. They are big enough to sleep in, as well as carry about a weeks worth of food and water.

A small (14-16") chain saw with some fuel would be a good item to consider. I just came home from a trip to find my road blocked by fallen trees from a storm, so the lesson is recent.

We store extra food in plastic laundry baskets in our pantry. I date and rotate on an ongoing basis. We can grab the baskets in a moment and load them into a vehicle.

I also store 10 gallons of gas for home generator use, and these can be quickly loaded too.
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Old 08-22-2011, 08:42 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by bluepill View Post
Unless I missed it, no one has mentioned options other than the RV. I also own 2 SUV's with four wheel drive. In weather-related emergencies, that would probably be a better option to get around fallen trees, etc. They are big enough to sleep in, as well as carry about a weeks worth of food and water.

A small (14-16") chain saw with some fuel would be a good item to consider. I just came home from a trip to find my road blocked by fallen trees from a storm, so the lesson is recent.

We store extra food in plastic laundry baskets in our pantry. I date and rotate on an ongoing basis. We can grab the baskets in a moment and load them into a vehicle.

I also store 10 gallons of gas for home generator use, and these can be quickly loaded too.
Right. The overall subject of emergency planning is quite extensive. I was trying to focus this thread on the parts of it were an RV could help and how to deal with those times. You are correct that an RV isn't always the best solution and that we all need plans when it won't work. In my OP, I was trying to set up those conditions.

Your comment about road navigability is a good one, regardless of what you are driving. Many of the GPS systems find what they consider to be the best route and that is all they want to do. That is why the recommendation is for paper maps in an emergency. The folks that I've talked with on this subject recommend planning routes other than freeways and major highways as escape detours. The hurricane evacuation routes were clogged because everyone tried to use them at once.

In the RV, we use Delorme's Street Atlas. On of its features is to allow you to select different types of roads and given them different priorities. As part of my escape planning with the RV, I'm to tell the software to avoid Interstates and major highways and see how it plans the routes.

I also like your idea about a chainsaw.
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Old 08-22-2011, 08:54 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by tgvas View Post
I am a prepper of sorts, more, I am someone who simply learned the way of life that was America, when most people had a 3-6 month supply of food always on hand, and I learned this from someone who will always be smarter then me, my beloved great grand mother and maybe I can share some useful tips that she taught me........

Iím not one of those preppers who wants to see doom and gloom in our future, but the US Government has been warning us about all of the possibilities for years, and the world is a mess, our economy is on the verge, so whatever is available, Ham radio, sat phones or a wire with two cans, communications are one of the most important considerations of all.
........
Don't feel ashamed to be one of those ultimate preppers, it's ok to be completely prepared, but even during a bug-out, what's the point if your not having fun?
Yours is a good point. The problem for many of us is there are some folks who go to extremes on this subject and are consumed by it. Some I would rather think about as "survivalists" who approach an emergency by running into the most remote woods that they can find. That might be a strategy for some but I'm not planning that way.

All too often, we lull ourselves into a day to day lifestyle. Planning means thinking about what I'm going to watch on TV this evening. I've had some triggers recently that have caused me to try to plan differently and for longer periods of time It is exchanges of ideas like this thread that help to to expand my thinking, consider different types of situations and what I'd do if they happened. If felt like some of those situations would be easier if we could use the RV.

I just bought a generator for the house (the one in the RV is propane and might not last long enough for the types of emergencies that I'm planning for.) There are a number of "stay at home" types of emergencies that I want to be ready for, too.
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Old 08-23-2011, 08:35 PM   #51
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Solar to keep the RV batteries charged is almost mandatory in a scenario this thread highlights. Portable folding panels would be the better choice, as they may be moved, positioned to catch the most sunlight wherever you are.
Where our permanent house is located, we would be better staying home than trying to drive anywhere else. Tornadoes have passed within a few miles of our valley (100'+ hills all around us) but the hills and associated ridges divert them away; our house is on a 30' hill above an always running creek (boiled water is cheap); everything from deer to squirrels are always on our property for meat, dried beans as a constant diet will be tiresome but will sustain life..
That leaves solar power as our major project to sustain living. Our Children all live within 50 miles of our house. In the event of a disaster they only need to make it to our house, we can house, feed, and provide the necessities required to live for an extended period.

A question asked during a survival school I attended decades ago. . You are away from civilized areas without any (RV was destroyed for this scenario) shelter, food, or means of support. You can choose only one survival tool, what will it be?


Answer, an axe. With an axe you can build a shelter, kill game for food, cut up things like game hides for clothes, shave if you choose, dig with it, protect yourself. So_ while planning what to pack in your RV, consider an axe. Sure it's slower than a chainsaw (previously mentioned) but gets the job done, and costs nothing to run/use.
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Old 08-23-2011, 09:57 PM   #52
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I would add a good shovel to the list. Someone asked about dumping the holding tanks. If all else fails, dig a deep hole -- 4-6 ft if possible and far away from any water source. Human waste can also be composted. You Can Compost Human Waste! - Organic Gardening - MOTHER EARTH NEWS

If you are considering a long term plan -- some basic vegetable seeds stored in an airtight glass jar in the frig. Corn, beans, squash, tomatoes, carrots and greens can provide fairly complete nutrition.

Other thoughts -- rope, buckets, duct tape and heavyweight clear plastic are multi-taskers.
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Old 08-24-2011, 08:36 AM   #53
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Survival Plus

We are a little more extreme. We bought so that we can live off of the land for extremely long periods of time. My wife's previous husband ( deceased ) was adrift in the pacific during the war for more than 2 weeks and he stressed survival to my wife. We have fishing tackle and fly tying equipment, firearms for any occasion, food or protection, water purification device for lake or stream etc. Knives, axes, sharpening stones, 2 way radios, first aid kit, a very good multi-tool, and have food that we have vacuum sealed as well as canned goods, including meats such as Spam and Tuna. We have clothing for all climates, extra lights and fire starters. Our grill works with charcoal or wood. We also stash some cash. Don't forget tarps and buckets. Then we add our Bible and Survival guide books. We keep adding but are very conscious about weight. REMEMBER FREEDOM IS NOT FREE.
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Old 08-24-2011, 10:11 AM   #54
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let's talk water, ok?

Gizmag online mag had an article about the 'straw' water purification system for developing countries. These are primarily single user, hand-held devices that let you drink really clean water from really unclean sources, like sipping thru a straw. They are available in US for 15-25.00.

Reverse osmosis systems are available from 150-500.00 or more. I have had a ge 150.00 system for my fridge for 5 years, and never have seen a trace of residue on any surface during that time. At least it has kept my rotten well water visible contaminants away. But I saw a great system for 450.00 that included pump, pressure tank, ro system for 30-40 gals/day, that I'll buy in a heartbeat when I can save up the cash.

With any of these systems, having drinkable water is doable as long as you have a raw supply. Any of these will work in a mh/camper platform. Grab your bucket, head for the stream or river, or dump the rainwater-catcher and pass it thru the system, and you can drink clean water with peace of mind.

Do a search for 'water purifying straw' and 'reverse osmosis filters'.
am
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Old 08-24-2011, 11:16 AM   #55
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I remember reading some stories about Katrina and one thing stuck out. That was fuel.

During evacuation gasoline was the first thing to go. Stations that had both gas and diesel typically had plenty of diesel after the gas dried up.

I think if I lived in that area I would be inclined to get a DP and diesel genny.
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Old 08-24-2011, 02:52 PM   #56
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I remember reading some stories about Katrina and one thing stuck out. That was fuel.

During evacuation gasoline was the first thing to go. Stations that had both gas and diesel typically had plenty of diesel after the gas dried up.

I think if I lived in that area I would be inclined to get a DP and diesel genny.
One of the reasons for that was that the government set up an evacuation route. Ike was the same thing in Texas. One of the planning recommendations is to stay off the major highways where the traffic jams occurred and people sat for days. One of the seminars that I attended recommended the Delorme Atlas in hard copy and planning in advance how to use to back roads from your location to evacuate.
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