Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > iRV2.com General Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-24-2012, 10:51 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Dunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Phx, Arid~zona
Posts: 11,106
I have a Nitrogen tank and regulator that I use for the shocks in my sandrail. It prevents rust and contamination in the shocks. I don't think the size tank I have would do all 6 19.5 MH tires to 85 psi.
__________________

__________________
2004 32' National Sea Breeze 1311 Class A on a F-53 Chassis, CHF, TST TPMS, 5Star Tune.
If Dunner (RVM23) can't fix it, it ain't broke!
Cheap Handling Fix Poll. Click Here to vote?
Dunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-24-2012, 11:27 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
slickest1's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: B.C.
Posts: 3,717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_D View Post
X3.

The only "saving grace" is that it's moisture free. And compressed air might not be unless there's an air dryer in the line.

Moisture can attack the metal belts in a tire and cause them to rust, which breaks the bond between the metal and rubber and can easily lead to a blowout. And then the tire manufacturer gets blamed for a faulty tire.
The only way moisture can attack the steel belts in tires and cause rust is if there are cuts in the tire down to the metal allowing the moisture to access the belts. In 10 years of working in a retread facility that was my observation. In my years of trucking, I have seen hundreds of tires mounted and dismounted and never found moisture in side when dismounted.

Most tire leakage comes from a damaged inner liner in the tire mostly caused by under inflation!
__________________

__________________
Dennis & Marcie & Captain Hook The Jack Russell,aka PUP, 04 Dodge/Cummins 01 Citation 29.rk fifth wheel.RVM59
slickest1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 12:03 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Dunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Phx, Arid~zona
Posts: 11,106
The paddle tires on our sand rails have very thin sidewalls and tend to leak. So bad, that with some, when you come out on a dewey morning, it looks like foam on the sidewalls. At first, a lot of us used Slime® stop leak. We found that Slime® caused cancer inside the aluminum rims. So bad, that a friend had it eat all the way through the rim. I switched to a 50/50 mixture of NAPA tire sealant/filtered water and my tires no longer leak. My friends have had the same success.

Point being that it stays liquid and there is never any rust inside the wheel. They don't have steel belts, but there is also no corrosion. Unlike Slime®, it washes right off when it's time to sell the tires to newbees or people with lower powered rails that don't need the bite of a tire with taller paddles. Don't use Slime if you have aluminum rims on your MH or trailer. Slime says they have a more aluminum friendly version, but I won't take the change.
__________________
2004 32' National Sea Breeze 1311 Class A on a F-53 Chassis, CHF, TST TPMS, 5Star Tune.
If Dunner (RVM23) can't fix it, it ain't broke!
Cheap Handling Fix Poll. Click Here to vote?
Dunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 12:10 PM   #18
Moderator Emeritus
 
TXiceman's Avatar


 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Oklahoma Boomers Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Full Time, TX Home Base
Posts: 17,150
Blog Entries: 21
Nitrogen will follow the gas laws and when the tire heats the air in the tire, the pressure will rise....so the theory that nitrogen charged tires do not heat up and increase pressure is pure BS. Any tire that runs down the road will heat up due to flexing of the sidewall and thread and also due to friction on the pavement.

So save your dollars and use free air which is 74% nitrogen. On your home aire compressor you can easily add a drier to take care of the moisture.

Ken
__________________
Amateur Radio Operator (KE5DFR)|Full-Time! - 2012 6.7L Ford Crew Cab Dually -2013 HitchHiker Champagne 38RLRSB - Travel with one Standard Schnauzer and one small Timneh African Gray Parrot
TXiceman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 01:31 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 12
While N2 can't and won't solve tire problems, it IS better than regular old air. There is a reason that every commercial and military aircraft has N2 in the tires and that is because it is dry. No moisture equals less pressure change during temperature fluctuations.
Now whether the cost trade off is worth it for the average Joe, that is for them to decide. But to flatly say that it's snake oil is ignorant. I do agree that a quality filter/dryer on an air compressor will work just fine for airing up tires, but even then, it's at best a wash vs. nitrogen.
__________________
Dave Wilburn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 02:39 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Rochester, MN, USA
Posts: 347
I think the OP's question is quite valid. Even though air is 78% nitrogen there is still some water vapor and oxygen remaining. In the internal tire environment the combination of mechanical flexing, temperature cycling and high pressure might allow moist O2 to permeate to the steel belt

I would like to hear from some nitrogen users whether they have been able to exceed the 5-7 year tire life or not.

Hae a nice day - Darrel
__________________
2007 3912 KSDP w/350HP ISL Cummins
2003 Grand Cherokee toad w/M&G Brake
Darrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 03:49 AM   #21
Community Moderator
 
RV Wizard's Avatar


 
Country Coach Owners Club
Appalachian Campers
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Chattanooga, Tn.
Posts: 12,062
Tire manufacturers have engineered the increase in air pressure due to heat build up in the tires. Using a cold tire pressure setting for a certain weight load for a particular tire will end up at the correct pressure under hot conditions. Tire failure of a properly maintained tire without road debris damage is just plain old age; the rubber compound of the tire fatigues and cannot perform it job of handling the load. If you use dry air, keep the tires properly aired up, out of direct sunlight and as dry as possible the only other better thing one can do is to just keep driving it. A rolling tire will last in time longer than a sitting tire.
Keep in mind that tires are rated for a maximum speed of 65 mph. For every mph over 65 the tire rated carrying capacity must be reduced 50 lbs.
__________________
Mike, RVIA & RVSA Certified Master RV Technician
Amy, Dr. Assistant - Roxie & Mei Ling, four legs each
2000 Gulf Stream Scenic Cruiser 450 hp & 1330# torque
06 Saturn Vue, 06 Chevy Z71 4x4 & 2014 Corvette Z51 M7
RV Wizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 07:05 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 73
Do the tire dealers that "sell" nitrogen vacuum the air out prior to installing nitrogen?
__________________
2012 RAM 3500 CTD 4x4 DRW
2016 Attitude 28SAG DS
ntrsandman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 07:14 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Dunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Phx, Arid~zona
Posts: 11,106
Nitrogen vs Air In Tires - Why Nitrogen in Tires - Popular Mechanics
__________________
2004 32' National Sea Breeze 1311 Class A on a F-53 Chassis, CHF, TST TPMS, 5Star Tune.
If Dunner (RVM23) can't fix it, it ain't broke!
Cheap Handling Fix Poll. Click Here to vote?
Dunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 11:59 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
scenic route's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,767
IMHO, I think that for the tire industry, nitrogen is one of the best marketing tools they have used in a long time. As an Earth bound user of their products, I can't justify the cost of nitrogen's limited benefits.

The left sidebar with the FAQs, should provide some good info...Bob

Nitrogen for Tires: FAQ
__________________
Jan and Bob

RIP 'Squeaky'
scenic route is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 12:24 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzick View Post
Since our motorhome tires seem to heat up within normal limits while traveling, and we lose only about 4 psi per year (from 105) I will stick with the cheap ordinary air.
Which is already 78% Nitrogen anyway.
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 12:26 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by slickest1 View Post

Most tire leakage comes from a damaged inner liner in the tire mostly caused by under inflation!
Which then allows moisture in and attacks the steel belts and the tire manufacturer is criticized for producing bad tires.
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 12:33 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrel View Post
I think the OP's question is quite valid. Even though air is 78% nitrogen there is still some water vapor and oxygen remaining. In the internal tire environment the combination of mechanical flexing, temperature cycling and high pressure might allow moist O2 to permeate to the steel belt

I would like to hear from some nitrogen users whether they have been able to exceed the 5-7 year tire life or not.

Darrel
I don't use nitrogen and easily got 8˝ years out of our Michelin's before I changed them out. Even then they had never leaked and the sidewalls, while not crack free were still within Michelin's "safe" band.

BTW, the "507 year tire life" is an old wives tale or Internet legend. No tire manufacturer says tires need to be changed out that soon. They do say that as tires age they become more susceptible to damage and should be checked at least yearly.
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 12:34 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by RV Wizard View Post
Keep in mind that tires are rated for a maximum speed of 65 mph. For every mph over 65 the tire rated carrying capacity must be reduced 50 lbs.
Michelin rates almost all of their RV tires for 75 mph.
__________________

__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.