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Old 06-20-2012, 10:19 PM   #1
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Tire date question

I just checked my tires and the characters after DOT are PJIL. I was thinking I would find numbers, not letters. Any one know how to decipher this? They are Pathfinder brand.
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Old 06-20-2012, 10:41 PM   #2
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When it comes to determining the age of a tire, it is easy to identify when a tire was manufactured by reading its Tire Identification Number (often referred to as the tire’s serial number). Unlike vehicle identification numbers (VINs) and the serial numbers used on many other consumer goods (which identify one specific item), Tire Identification Numbers are really batch codes that identify the week and year the tire was produced.
The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) requires that Tire Identification Numbers be a combination of the letters DOT, followed by ten, eleven or twelve letters and/or numbers that identify the manufacturing location, tire size and manufacturer's code, along with the week and year the tire was manufactured.
Tires Manufactured Since 2000
Since 2000, the week and year the tire was produced has been provided by the last four digits of the Tire Identification Number with the 2 digits being used to identify the week immediately preceding the 2 digits used to identify the year.
Example of a tire manufactured since 2000 with the current Tire Identification Number format:
In the example above:
DOT U2LL LMLR 5107DOT U2LL LMLR 5107Manufactured during the 51st week of the yearDOT U2LL LMLR 5107Manufactured during 2007
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:18 PM   #3
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You aren't looking at the right numbers. Go to the far right end of the string that starts with DOT and you will find 4 numbers, as in the photo above (the "5107")
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Old 06-22-2012, 08:17 PM   #4
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The 'date' brand will only be on one side of the tire. If you do not see it on one side look at the other. Also just be aware that even though you might have just purchased the tires, they still could be several years old already. As long as they were stored 'properly' they will be fine.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:49 PM   #5
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I sometimes wonder just how critical all this is around the date of mfg for tires. I mean, properly cared for, a tire should last many many years.

I have run drive tires on my 18 wheelers up to and beyond 300,000 miles to have them recapped and go another 200,00 or so. I some cases have them capped again. Maintain proper air pressure and avoid over speed, especially in extreme heat conditions.

I have an old car that I know for certain hasn't had the tires replaced in ten years. All four are in great shape and no worries about hitting the road with them.

I can locate all sorts of farm trucks and the like that never get many miles on their clocks. Those tires can easily be 25 years or older. When used more than likely will be abused with weight and road conditions or lack there of.

The one that really comes to mind are the tires on an old trailer I have. Those old military tires were mounted back around 1975 and were 20 plus years old then. So maybe fifty year old bias ply rubber and still holding strong. Never see that may miles, but when they do, the miles are hard and likely over loaded.

So... although there may be a thread of validity in watching tire manufacturing dates, I for one am not that concerned with that date alone. There are lost more factors to consider than just a tire's age. Seems to me like a modern day gimmick to help the tire companies sell more product.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auto hauler View Post
I sometimes wonder just how critical all this is around the date of mfg for tires. I mean, properly cared for, a tire should last many many years.

I have run drive tires on my 18 wheelers up to and beyond 300,000 miles to have them recapped and go another 200,00 or so. I some cases have them capped again. Maintain proper air pressure and avoid over speed, especially in extreme heat conditions.
But if you run 100,000 miles a year that makes the carcass only 3 years old. Besides, running them lots of miles keeps the chemicals that fight rot coming to the surface. That's not the way most MH owners treat their tires.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:16 PM   #7
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But if you run 100,000 miles a year that makes the carcass only 3 years old. Besides, running them lots of miles keeps the chemicals that fight rot coming to the surface. That's not the way most MH owners treat their tires.

You are right! Constant proper use does help a bunch..... More like 150,000 mile a year though.... Recap and keep on going...... Until I got into the rigs I have now days. The ultra low profile 22.5 casings don't work well being recapped.
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Old 06-23-2012, 03:12 PM   #8
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There are lost more factors to consider than just a tire's age. Seems to me like a modern day gimmick to help the tire companies sell more product.
The tire companies all swear their tires last at least 10 years with proper care - it is the RVing community that is pushing the lower age levels. But you are right - age is not the only factor and should not take on religious significance in the replacement decision. I still believe, though, that a 7-8 year old tire that hasn't been driven much is ripe for a blow-out. Not guaranteed to blow, but ripe with the possibility.
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Old 09-18-2012, 03:55 PM   #9
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Once again I have to thank the great people here. First thing we did when we bought this rv a year ago is to put 6 new Cooper tires on it. I just got around to looking, and they were made that very month !! Made in USA .. And yes I had to come back in and search the forum's to find out the rear tire dates on mine were facing each other.. (duals) But I found them. Any "peace" of mind I can find (I've lost most of it) is a Great thing !! Thanks Bunches everybody !!
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