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Old 07-22-2012, 06:33 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Winnebeater View Post
The front and rear are supported by jack stands. I do that because an RV mechanic told me that if I store the RV with the hydraulic levelers extended and have weight on them that the seals on the rams will prematurely fail. I don't know if that is true, but I didn't want to take any chances.
I've stored ours with the front wheels entirely off the ground for up to 6 months at a time supported only by the HWY jacks. 10 years now and no leaks or any other problems with the HWH system. But, the rams are rated at 12,000#'s each and the front only weighs about 13,200#'s so we're not close to maxing them out.
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Old 07-22-2012, 07:14 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by saw4980 View Post
I have read somewhere that in order to preserve the life of your tires, you need to cover them and put something underneath the tires to keep the moisture away/off of them.

Currently I have them up on paver blocks with a piece of wood between the tire and concrete. It was hell driving the RV up onto them.

Also, I saw some 1/2" rubber matting that I could easily cut up and replace for the wood. Would the rubber hold the moisture more than the wood or should I stick with the wood/concrete block mix?

Can I get some tips on what worked best for you?
Mostly a myth.

Tires are made out of an assortment of chemicals, many of them petro based. Tires are in fact 'WET" and they will dry out on the outside after a while. Want to keep them from doing so, then, ez, DRIVE on them. Its the flexing of the tire that brings the oils to the top layer.

How long before they dry out. Who knows, but I picked up a trailer that had set in a open yard since 1992, tires looked looked like the bark on a tree, but I had to drive the trailer over 500 miles. I aired them up drove off and went over 500 miles over 4 days and did not have a problem at all. In fact I ran an ad and sold the tires for a $100 bucks (2 plus spare).

You covering up the tires is a waste of time and money, want to protect them the its Aerospace 303 protectant, nothing is better.

Tires are tough, REAL tough and covering, lifting, jacking or anything else is only feel good for you, does nothing for the tire.

All that said certainly at some point in time they will go to heck in a hand-basket, but most likely they will outlive you.

Wanna see some really OLD tires hit one of the big Barrett Jackson or other major car auctions, you will see ties on vehicles that have been on them since the 50's and older, still holding air, still rolling and that is the key, keep them rolling once in a while to move the oils thru the tires and don't worry be happy.
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Old 07-22-2012, 07:34 PM   #17
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Mostly a myth.

Tires are made out of an assortment of chemicals, many of them petro based. Tires are in fact 'WET" and they will dry out on the outside after a while. Want to keep them from doing so, then, ez, DRIVE on them. Its the flexing of the tire that brings the oils to the top layer.

How long before they dry out. Who knows, but I picked up a trailer that had set in a open yard since 1992, tires looked looked like the bark on a tree, but I had to drive the trailer over 500 miles. I aired them up drove off and went over 500 miles over 4 days and did not have a problem at all. In fact I ran an ad and sold the tires for a $100 bucks (2 plus spare).

You covering up the tires is a waste of time and money, want to protect them the its Aerospace 303 protectant, nothing is better.

Tires are tough, REAL tough and covering, lifting, jacking or anything else is only feel good for you, does nothing for the tire.

All that said certainly at some point in time they will go to heck in a hand-basket, but most likely they will outlive you.

Wanna see some really OLD tires hit one of the big Barrett Jackson or other major car auctions, you will see ties on vehicles that have been on them since the 50's and older, still holding air, still rolling and that is the key, keep them rolling once in a while to move the oils thru the tires and don't worry be happy.
Not to be contrary, but that is exactly opposite of what Michelin states in its RV tire guide. Not that I take that as gospel, just sayin'
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Old 07-22-2012, 07:55 PM   #18
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One thing is saying that the difference is minimal, but to say that sun exposure doesn't do ANYTHING different to tires or any other man made material is just false.
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Old 07-23-2012, 03:16 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by 17Oaks View Post
...You covering up the tires is a waste of time and money, want to protect them the its Aerospace 303 protectant, nothing is better.

Tires are tough, REAL tough and covering, lifting, jacking or anything else is only feel good for you, does nothing for the tire.

All that said certainly at some point in time they will go to heck in a hand-basket, but most likely they will outlive you.
There is another thread called "How important are tire covers?" ... and we have had some lively discussion over there! I posted this recently, and it certainly applies here ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathryn View Post
AHA! Actually went out and did some online RESEARCH re: tire covers ...

" ...UV rays speed the aging process of your tires, which can lead to dry rot or premature cracks in the sidewalls... The sun's UV rays can ruin your tires while the vehicle is sitting, when they are more susceptible to sun damage because they get little use. Normal driving causes your tires to heat up and flex, which maintains the tire's built-in UV protection ..."


From the Goodyear site (which has an extensive RV tire section):
located at Goodyear RV Tires

"RVIA (Recreational Vehicle Industry Association) says, ”Statistics indicate that the average life of an RV tire is five to seven years. "

Replacement - more frequent usage will result in longer life.

Weather cracking is common in RV tires from all manufacturers.
Appears as crazing and or cracking in the flex area of the sidewall
Probable causes of sidewall weathering
— Long periods of inactivity or storage
— Direct exposure to air and sunlight
— Exposure to high levels of ozone (smog, electrical generators)
— Excessive washing or dressing using alcohol or petroleum based cleaners

To combat weather cracking and dry rot, Goodyear uses anti-oxidants and anti-ozonants not only in the tire sidewall but in the tire casing as well. These anti-oxidants and anti-ozonants slowly make their way through to the sidewall to keep the sidewall looking great for many, many years. Anti-oxidants and anti-ozonants protect the tire from ozone, UV light, and sunlight.

As far as making the tire look shiny, there are a variety of products on the market today. We do not recommend or endorse any specific product. Just stay away from any petroleum based product which can react to the rubber.

Kathryn
and the follow-up ...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathryn View Post
. ... based on the research I did in above post #56, it would appear the use of wheel covers OR a non-petroleum based protective dressing DO extend tire life if used when the vehicle is parked for more than a few days.

Kathryn
and finally ...

"RVIA (Recreational Vehicle Industry Association) says, ”Statistics indicate that the average life of an RV tire is five to seven years. "

Kathryn
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Old 07-23-2012, 09:35 AM   #20
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Not to be contrary, but that is exactly opposite of what Michelin states in its RV tire guide. Not that I take that as gospel, just sayin'
Here is what is sez ( from page 7, download here: Michelin North America RV Reference Materials Page ):

"Here are a few tips to help you protect the tires from
these common damage conditions:
1) Keep the tires properly inflated.
2) Keep the tires clean.
3) Avoid prolonged exposure to heat, cold, or moisture.
4) Avoid prolonged exposure to ultraviolet rays.
5) Cover the tires when the vehicle is not in use.
6) Do not park near electric generators or transformers.
7) Do not store vehicle in an area where welding is being
done or in a garage that has mercury vapor lamps."


Lets take a look at some of this: Item 3/4/5 sounds like nothing but 'CYA' marketing talk. I guess if you live in Alaska you can not own an RV or live in Arizona or the SW.

The tires on the trailer I mentioned in my post that were in the open for over 15 years were MICHELIN®!

If you want your tires to crack and go bad as I stated DO NOT drive it. Guess its the old saying, if you don't use it you lose it certainly applies here.

Service life on tires is about 7-8 years no matter how you slice it.

The world if full of tires tires, military motor pools have tens of thousands of vehicles sitting there exposed to the elements from extreme heat to extreme cold. Or all those ranch and farm trailers, tractors and implement tires.

I have friends in RV that when traveling they stop for lunch, they cover their tires. I did mention to them one time the time they spend to cover the tires, if they just ate and got gone the tires would have less exposure.

I would suggest that if you do NOT expect to use the tire up (tread-wear) in about 7 years then you fit the category of "PROLONGED" storage...that said do you really want to drive around in your 52,000 lb Class A on tires that are 10 years or older, I don't but that is just me, you are welcome to cover you tires etc. I do apply Aerospace 303, but I also drive enough that a set of tires would never last me 7 years or 8 years.
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Old 07-23-2012, 12:39 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Mr_D
I've stored ours with the front wheels entirely off the ground for up to 6 months at a time supported only by the HWY jacks. 10 years now and no leaks or any other problems with the HWH system. But, the rams are rated at 12,000#'s each and the front only weighs about 13,200#'s so we're not close to maxing them out.
That is very interesting, I think I will check my weight capacities for my HWH rams. I could use one of your to lift my whole motorhome😂. Mine weighs in around 12,000lbs.
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Old 07-23-2012, 12:58 PM   #22
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The problem with much of the old-timer RV tire folklore is that it was developed in the days of bias ply tires and less-capable rubber compounds. When I was a young man, a set of tires only lasted a year or two under the best of circumstances and 20k was an old tire. Now most any tire will last several years and go 60k miles or more.

Trailer tires may be an exception. They are nearly always loaded to (or beyond) their max right from the gitgo and suffer badly if they are run a bit soft or hit a pothole or debris. But I don't think covering them helps give a longer life either. A tire that is maxed out is going to have a short life.
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Old 07-24-2012, 08:40 AM   #23
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The problem with much of the old-timer RV tire folklore is that it was developed in the days of bias ply tires and less-capable rubber compounds. When I was a young man, a set of tires only lasted a year or two under the best of circumstances and 20k was an old tire. Now most any tire will last several years and go 60k miles or more.

Trailer tires may be an exception. They are nearly always loaded to (or beyond) their max right from the gitgo and suffer badly if they are run a bit soft or hit a pothole or debris. But I don't think covering them helps give a longer life either. A tire that is maxed out is going to have a short life.
Absolutely!

Let me go on the record:

Number 1 killer of tires: Inactivity, that means NOT driving them.

I am amazed that in everything on RV tires posted here the words "PROLONGED" and "STORAGE" does not seem to carry any weight. Yet the US and the world rolls on tires from the Sonoran desert of Phoenix to the N to Alaska, cars and trucks that set in work place parking lots exposed to what ever 5 days a week, 8 hrs a day. In my years in corp America I was a 'road warrior'. I left out Sun or Mon and returned Fr or Sat and my car sat out on the top level of parking at DFW airport exposed to everything. I never had a single problem with tires.

I was at a RV park few weeks back and a saw folks puling in and several of them the moment the rig stopped I see a wife and man RUNNING with tie covers to hide the tires from the mean old Texas sun. What amazing me was how many did this as the very first thing done. Just like my friends who stop of the side of the highway to fix a sandwich, spend more time covering tires than they do eating lunch...sorry but none of that is doing a single thing for you other than fooling yourself.

If you are driving on any kind of regular basis as in weekly for enough miles to fully heat up your tires the oils and chemicals that protect the tire will come to the surface and do the job. I recommend you supplement that with 303 which you can give a spray every few weeks. Those tires will last to the end of their useful life which is about 7 years +/-.

Here is a pic of a tire on a parade float that gets used about 4 times a year. In trying to find out how old the tire was several folks said the trailer was donated as over 20 years ago. While the tread is gone, the tire has no checking or cracks in it in spite of sitting in an open field here in S Texas for who knows how long, at least 20 years only driven 4 times a year in a parade less than 1 mile long. I had the tires inspected by Discount Tire and with this exception the other 3 were in good driving condition. I just donated the rebuild of the trailer along with new tires that will take it out another 20 years I hope.
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Old 07-24-2012, 08:54 AM   #24
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"Number 1 Killer of tires: inactivity, that means not driving them."
Couldn't agree more.
Number 2: not maintaining proper pressures.
Number 3: not affording some type of UV protection (303) or covers.
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Old 07-24-2012, 01:45 PM   #25
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"Number 1 Killer of tires: inactivity, that means not driving them."
Couldn't agree more.
Number 2: not maintaining proper pressures.
Number 3: not affording some type of UV protection (303) or covers.
Number 3 for rarely used tires and a distant, distant 3rd
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Old 07-25-2012, 03:38 PM   #26
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I do not raise motorhome tires off the ground with hydraulic jacks anytime! Aerospace 303 on tires regularly and covers when sitting in sun for extended period of time (storage, sitting at home, fulltiming, snowbirding, etc). Maintain proper tire pressure. I also put either wood or rubber under wheels when sitting on asphalt, concrete, sand, gravel, etc. You will get multiple opinions but those are the things I think work best after RVing for 30 years.
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Old 07-25-2012, 03:43 PM   #27
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Armor All and put it away. You end up spending more time and money and you still have to replace them. Mine just turned 7 and they look like new. never been covered.
Michelin 315's
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:08 PM   #28
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I just slather my tires in extra virgin olive oil and then park the rig on my back yard lawn. I think the chlorophyl from the grass helps to preserve the tires and keeps them looking like new.
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