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Old 07-25-2012, 08:13 PM   #29
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you got the right idea....protect, cover, keep off soft ground preferably. Simple as that.

Don't use armour all tire shine...some protectants actually harm rubber. Michelin and other brands make safe protectants
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:29 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Mopar View Post
you got the right idea....protect, cover, keep off soft ground preferably. Simple as that.

Don't use armour all tire shine...some protectants actually harm rubber. Michelin and other brands make safe protectants
The Michelin Tire Shine looks and feels like 303 and the last time I went looking for it Michelin said it was out of production and they had no date for it coming back. Just checked the Michelin site, still "Out of Stock"!

Michelin puts it in writing that tires should be inspected yearly starting at 5 years and absolutely replaced at 10.
We went 8Ĺ years and that was early as one size I needed was in short supply so I ordered them expecting a several month wait. They came in in about three weeks but I went ahead and changed them anyway.
Quote:
Michelin Technical Bulletin
May 15, 2006

Service Life for RV/Motorhome Tires

The following recommendation applies to RV/Motorhome tires. Tires are composed of various types of material and rubber compounds, having performance properties essential to the proper functioning of the tire itself. These component properties evolve over time. For each tire, this evolution depends upon many factors such as weather, storage conditions, and conditions of use (load, speed, inflation pressure, maintenance, etc.) to which the tire is subjected throughout its life. This service-related evolution varies widely so that accurately predicting the serviceable life of any specific tire in advance is not possible.

That is why, in addition to regular inspections and inflation pressure maintenance by consumers, it is recommended to have RV/Motorhome tires, including spare tires, inspected regularly by a qualified tire specialist, such as a tire dealer, who will assess the tire’s suitability for continued service. Tires that have been in use for 5 years or more should continue to be inspected by a specialist at least annually.

Consumers are strongly encouraged to be aware not only of their tires’ visual condition and inflation pressure, but also of any change in dynamic performance such as increased air loss, noise or vibration, which could be an indication that the tires need to be removed from service to prevent tire failure.

It is impossible to predict when tires should be replaced based on their calendar age alone. However, the older a tire the greater the chance that it will need to be replaced due to the service-related evolution or other conditions found upon inspection or detected during use.

While most tires will need replacement before they achieve 10 years, it is recommended that any tires in service 10 years or more from the date of manufacture, including spare tires, be replaced with new tires as a simple precaution even if such tires appear serviceable and even if they have not reached the legal wear limit.

For tires that were on an original equipment vehicle (i.e., acquired by the consumer on a new vehicle), follow the vehicle manufacturer’s tire replacement recommendations, when specified (but not to exceed 10 years).

The date when a tire was manufactured is located on the sidewall of each tire. Consumers should locate the Department of Transportation or DOT code on the tire that begins with DOT and ends with the week and year of manufacture. For example, a DOT code ending with “0304” indicates a tire made in the 3rd week (Jan) of 2004.
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Old 07-25-2012, 09:17 PM   #31
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yeah, it does feel like 303. It's good stuff.

I've ran old tires (more than 10yrs old), but after you pass the 7-8yr mark, you might want to start shopping around. I've raced at the strip on 20yr old slicks, and my 15yr old summer cruiser has it's original G.Year Eagles still on it. I look them over carefully though. I don't drive on damaged tires. I replaced a 5yr old set of Michelins with virtually no miles on them simply because I didn't like how badly cracked they were becoming.
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Old 07-25-2012, 09:18 PM   #32
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Set of tire covers runs less than $100. Gallon of 303 is $60.
Average tire cost is $500.
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Old 07-26-2012, 01:17 AM   #33
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I just slather my tires in extra virgin olive oil and then park the rig on my back yard lawn. I think the chlorophyl from the grass helps to preserve the tires and keeps them looking like new.
D'oh! Extra Virgin!
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Old 08-03-2012, 11:24 PM   #34
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where do you get the protectant for your tires? Never heard of it.
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Old 08-03-2012, 11:35 PM   #35
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where do you get the protectant for your tires? Never heard of it.
303 Protectant, Also on Amazon and at Camping World.
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Old 08-04-2012, 02:42 PM   #36
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303 Protectant, Also on Amazon and at Camping World.
Most marine store carry it.
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Old 08-04-2012, 10:03 PM   #37
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I have three posts on Tire Covers. Here is one. Once on the blog you can search for the others using "covers" for search. I show the effect of white vs dark color covers.

Also just did a post showing 5 different tire dressing chemicals.

Enjoy
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Old 08-04-2012, 11:00 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
I have three posts on Tire Covers. Here is one. Once on the blog you can search for the others using "covers" for search. I show the effect of white vs dark color covers.

Also just did a post showing 5 different tire dressing chemicals.

Enjoy
Your postings on various internet forums are becoming very commercial. Giving answers by referring posters to your blog - which is sponsored - is not really participating in the threads you post such references in. Iím surprised the mods are letting you get away with it.

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Old 08-05-2012, 10:22 AM   #39
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Fast, Sorry you don't like my posts. Are you suggesting I should not direct people to any web site where there is advertising?

I don't have the time to re-write the same answers to the same questions over and over again.

The inclusion of pictures does not allow Copy & Paste so it would be a full time job providing the same information on the 5 different forums I monitor.

Yes there is advertising on my blog but I do not ask for or approve the content. Believe it or not I have yet to receive a complaint from a reader on the "commercials".

If readers do not want to see any advertising the answer is simple. Don't follow any links.
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Old 08-05-2012, 10:31 AM   #40
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In response to FastEagle's request here is the info on Tire Dressings. I have removed all links and brand names. Hope this helps.
+++++++++++++
Friday, August 3, 2012

Tire Dressings


In a previous post I was asked for recommendations on which tire dressing to use.

I decided to run a small sample test involving 5 different tire dressings. Now before you complain that I didn't include your choice you need to remember I have no budget for running tests or support or sponsorship from any of the products involved. I bought these products at retail.

I am not sure of the actual chemistry for any of the numerous products BUT I will offer some general guidelines for selecting a product.

Foremost Do not do damage to the tires when you"protect" them


For the test I marked off six different areas. One for each product plus one where no product was used. The tire sidewall I used was from a scrap tire that was punctured when almost new. I never washed the tire but I did just hose it off a few times. It has been left outside for over a year here in NE Ohio. Sometimes I would treat the tire each week. Other times I might not treat the tire for a number of weeks.

I will present two pictures for each product. One as the tire looks 5 days after treatment. The second picture was taken immediately after treatment. Most of the time between the pictures the tire sat in full sun at 85į to 95į ambient. It did rain hard one day.
In the order of the product seen in the picture above.



Since there is a color difference I am also providing pictures taken at the same time of the non-treated section.








I will not pass judgement or make any comments other than to say I made no edits to the pictures other than cropping and resizing the pictures. It is up to you to decide the "look" you want.

The general guidelines for selecting a tire dressing would be:

1. No Petroleum Distillates. This is a general recommendation from various tire manufacturers.

2. Do not use any abrasive brush. I remember back in the 60's (before I knew better) I used steel wool pad to clean my wide white sidewalls. I now know what I was doing was removing rubber and leaving small scratches in the tire. If I had done a lot of this I would have severely damaged the sidewall. Stiff brush or hard rubbing with rag can do minor damage and leave microscopic scratches which could initiate cracks.

3. No high pressure steam clean. This will remove all the protective materials that are built into the tire and if you get too close you have seen the damage shown in a previous blog post.

4. Some products make a lot of claims but I have never seen a direct comparison published.

5. Foaming action products would seem to be good. I have used this type of product on my passenger car. It doesn't seem to remove the tire materials. One brand I have personally used does appear to "wash-off" after a couple weeks so I have no reason to believe it is hurting the tire. I have not checked all of the dozen or so foaming "cleaners" so you will need to read the label and watch for petroleum distillates

Bottom line. For normal use on a vehicle that is driven frequently, you are allowing the protective materials to work out to the surface of the tire. I see no reason why you cannot wash your tires with the same methods and materials you use on the paint of your vehicles. The issue with RV tires is that you normally will not be replacing the tires after 4 or 5 years. RV tires need help as sitting for long periods is not really good for tires. White tire covers (See THIS post) are best they no only protect from UV they also help to keep the tires from excess heat which artificially ages them. See my previous three posts on covers.
If the product or cleaning method isn't something you would use on your car's paint then you might not want to use it on your tires.
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Old 08-06-2012, 03:58 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post

The inclusion of pictures does not allow Copy & Paste so it would be a full time job providing the same information on the 5 different forums I monitor.
This web site has one of the very best photo and photo album storage areas Iíve found anywhere on the internet. Itís easy to use and once you learn the particulars, single pictures can be displayed. Each will have their own internet address - link - and can be posted as reference material in documents, blogs or forum postings.

Here is an example of just how good the pictures can be. The first one is of a couple of broken links in my trailerís axle alignment arrangement. The second is of a tool that may be necessary to remove the rusted bolts. Also the new replacement links my brother-in-law made for me.

Axle_Parts_-_24_July_2011_3_ - iRV2.com RV Photo Gallery
Axle_Parts_-_24_July_2011_4_ - iRV2.com RV Photo Gallery
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Old 08-08-2012, 10:18 AM   #42
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Decided to spend the time posting the pictures. I could not edit my previous post so here is the section with pictures.

To be clear I AM NOT advertising, promoting or selling any of these products. I do not work for or have any financial interest is the companies that make these products. They just happened to be on the shelf of a local auto parts store where I bought them.
++++++++++++++++++++
Foremost Don't do damage as you try and "protect" your tires.


For the test I marked off six different areas. One for each product plus one where no product was used. The tire sidewall I used was from a scrap tire that was punctured when almost new. I never washed the tire but I did just hose it off a few times. It has been left outside for over a year here in NE Ohio. Sometimes I would treat the tire each week. Other times I might not treat the tire for a number of weeks.

I will present two pictures for each product. One as the tire looks 5 days after treatment. The second picture was taken immediately after treatment. Most of the time between the pictures the tire sat in full sun at 85į to 95į ambient. It did rain hard one day.
In the order of the product seen in the picture above.









































Since there is a color difference I am also providing pictures taken at the same time of the non-treated section.








I will not pass judgement or make any recommendation. The choice if any is up to you.
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