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Old 07-06-2016, 11:44 AM   #1
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Tire Pressure

Hi
I know my front tires need to be 65 PSI Maximum & rear tires 80 PSI Maximum
All of the 4 rear tires now indicate between 75 psi & 80 psi,all 4 are a different psi but within 5 psi
Front tires are between 62psi &65 psi
My question is if tire pressure is as noted above within the range noted or do all 4 tires need to be set at same psi & all front tires set at same psi
Is there a psi range that is safe or do all tires need to be set at exactly the same psi????
Almost impossible to get all 4 rear tires & 2 front tires exact same PSI
Thanks
Ted
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Old 07-06-2016, 05:24 PM   #2
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Somewhere in your MH are 1 or two labels that list the GVW and the tire inflation pressure for which the suspension was designed. This is the correct pressure for the tires, rather than the range listed on the tires. Find tha label and have the tires at the listed pressure and the MH will drive/handle as intended.
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Old 07-06-2016, 06:15 PM   #3
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How many pressure gauges do you have? Pick 1 and go with it. The tire manufacturer usually knows more than any web expert. Good luck.
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:35 AM   #4
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Rule 1
Do not run your tires at an inflation lower than needed to support the measured load.
Rule 2
Set tire pressure when tires are at "Ambient" temperature and not warmed by either being the the Sun or having been driven on in previous 2 hours.This is Cold Inflation Pressure
Rule 3
Do not bleed air out of a Hot tire.
Rule 4
All tires on each axle should have the same pressure.
Rule 4A
Establish the minimum inflation for tires on an axle based on heaviest loaded end

Suggestion
A Cold.Inflation Pressure should be the Minimum needed +10%
B Do not exceed the max pressure rating of the wheel
C Get and run a TPMS
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:08 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Rule 1
Do not run your tires at an inflation lower than needed to support the measured load.
Rule 2
Set tire pressure when tires are at "Ambient" temperature and not warmed by either being the the Sun or having been driven on in previous 2 hours.This is Cold Inflation Pressure
Rule 3
Do not bleed air out of a Hot tire.
Rule 4
All tires on each axle should have the same pressure.
Rule 4A
Establish the minimum inflation for tires on an axle based on heaviest loaded end

Suggestion
A Cold.Inflation Pressure should be the Minimum needed +10%
B Do not exceed the max pressure rating of the wheel
C Get and run a TPMS

Great advice!
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:46 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Rule 1
Do not run your tires at an inflation lower than needed to support the measured load.
Rule 2
Set tire pressure when tires are at "Ambient" temperature and not warmed by either being the the Sun or having been driven on in previous 2 hours.This is Cold Inflation Pressure
Rule 3
Do not bleed air out of a Hot tire.
Rule 4
All tires on each axle should have the same pressure.
Rule 4A
Establish the minimum inflation for tires on an axle based on heaviest loaded end

Suggestion
A Cold.Inflation Pressure should be the Minimum needed +10%
B Do not exceed the max pressure rating of the wheel
C Get and run a TPMS
On a side note Tireman, I looked at the inside of the wheels on our 16 Cougar, and only found a "load" rating, which we are very good with. I was looking for a pressure rating since we went from D load to E load... (65 psi vs 80 psi) ... ????
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Old 07-08-2016, 08:18 AM   #7
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Tire pressure

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrekGreat View Post
Hi
I know my front tires need to be 65 PSI Maximum & rear tires 80 PSI Maximum
All of the 4 rear tires now indicate between 75 psi & 80 psi,all 4 are a different psi but within 5 psi
Front tires are between 62psi &65 psi
My question is if tire pressure is as noted above within the range noted or do all 4 tires need to be set at same psi & all front tires set at same psi
Is there a psi range that is safe or do all tires need to be set at exactly the same psi????
Almost impossible to get all 4 rear tires & 2 front tires exact same PSI
Thanks
Ted
I recently had my tires rotated and balanced on our 2006 Holiday Rambler DP. The motor home had a little over 16,000 miles on it and there was a small amount of uneven wear on the front tires mainly on the curb side front which gets exposed to more abuse I think. I have it inspected and tire rotation done at a heavy truck facility that also does work for UPS type trucks and buses. I noticed that when they adjusted the tire pressure they pumped them up to 100 psi each. The tires are 255/70 R22.5 Goodyear RV tires. I normally ran them at 90 psi but tech said that size tire would do well with 100 psi to even out the wear pattern. Just curious what you guys are running in this size tire? The coach is 22,000 lbs. rated and is a 34' diesel pusher.
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Old 07-08-2016, 08:46 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beboboy9 View Post
I recently had my tires rotated and balanced on our 2006 Holiday Rambler DP. The motor home had a little over 16,000 miles on it and there was a small amount of uneven wear on the front tires mainly on the curb side front which gets exposed to more abuse I think. I have it inspected and tire rotation done at a heavy truck facility that also does work for UPS type trucks and buses. I noticed that when they adjusted the tire pressure they pumped them up to 100 psi each. The tires are 255/70 R22.5 Goodyear RV tires. I normally ran them at 90 psi but tech said that size tire would do well with 100 psi to even out the wear pattern. Just curious what you guys are running in this size tire? The coach is 22,000 lbs. rated and is a 34' diesel pusher.

If your tires are OEM, they are ten years old and manufacturer recommendations are that any tire still in service at 10 years of age be replaced.
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Old 07-08-2016, 09:07 AM   #9
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The best thing any MH owner can do for their tire's is get the coach weighted on all 4 corners. Then go to the label in your coach and see what the axle rating is, compare it to your 4 corner weight, you do not want any axle over the rated weight, if 1 is, move stuff around to bring it into the ratings. Then go to your tire manufacturers website and look up the pressure chart for your tire model. Inflate your tire's to the pressure shown, rotate your tires and among other things watch for side wall checking/cracking. If you do this tires should be good for 7 years. Anything over 7 years you are lucky. Tires can last longer, YOU just need to be more vigilant at inspection.

RV tire's usually die of old age rather than wear. If you stay on top of them keeping the pressures right, watch for side wall issues, etc they will serve you well. A tire blow at highway speeds is not a pretty sight, if it is a steer tire it can kill you. At the very least it does extensive damage to your coach. Bottom line, treat your tire's right, you and your loved one's lives are depending on it, not to mention others that are around you on the road.
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Old 07-08-2016, 09:16 AM   #10
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Tire Pressure

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ownby View Post
If your tires are OEM, they are ten years old and manufacturer recommendations are that any tire still in service at 10 years of age be replaced.

And that is IF the manufacturer was current in their production. For example if you have a chassis from 1 manufacturer and the coach from another, the tires could be several years old when you buy the coach. Always check the "born on date" stamped on the side wall. It is a 4 digit code showing the week and year the tire was manufactured, for example 2315 is the 23rd week of 2015. When buying tires tell the dealer all tires must be same born on date and that they can not be more than 6 months old. The only exception to that I would allow is if you have different steer tires than rear, and then only allow a week or 2 difference. If they will not do that, go to another dealer.
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Old 07-08-2016, 06:36 PM   #11
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On a side note Tireman, I looked at the inside of the wheels on our 16 Cougar, and only found a "load" rating, which we are very good with. I was looking for a pressure rating since we went from D load to E load... (65 psi vs 80 psi) ... ????

I understand. Some will say you can figure out ab inflation rating by looking at the OE tires and their LR.
Some others say that as long as you do net exceed the load rating you should be good.

One option is to go to better quality LR-F or LR-G but limit inflation to the calculated inflation and be sure to never exceed the load max.
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Old 07-09-2016, 07:41 AM   #12
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And that is IF the manufacturer was current in their production. For example if you have a chassis from 1 manufacturer and the coach from another, the tires could be several years old when you buy the coach. Always check the "born on date" stamped on the side wall. It is a 4 digit code showing the week and year the tire was manufactured, for example 2315 is the 23rd week of 2015. When buying tires tell the dealer all tires must be same born on date and that they can not be more than 6 months old. The only exception to that I would allow is if you have different steer tires than rear, and then only allow a week or 2 difference. If they will not do that, go to another dealer.

While asking for new tires to be "young" it is not necessary to have all tires of the same age. Simply stating that you will not accept any tire "Older " than 6 months.

TIP Figure out the date code of the oldest you will accept BEFORE you go into the dealer so you have the number written down and are not trying to figure it out when standing in front of the salesman. In fact it would be a good idea to have a slip of paper with the following info on it.
Tire Name
Load Range
letter (D, E, F, G etc)
Max age as in '0416' or whatever week is 26 younger than for the day you are ordering tires.
When you buy new tires ask for a copy of the tire registration form. That will have the full DOT serial for each tire.

Remember it's your money you are spending.
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Old 07-09-2016, 08:28 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Rule 4
All tires on each axle should have the same pressure.
Easy way to overheat and overload the dual tires is to not have them at the exact same pressure. Only within 5 pounds is asking for trouble.

Get the rig weighed when loaded at a local truck stop then use the tire manufacturer's weight chart to get the minimum pressure you should be running.
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Old 07-09-2016, 08:40 PM   #14
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Easy way to overheat and overload the dual tires is to not have them at the exact same pressure. Only within 5 pounds is asking for trouble.

Get the rig weighed when loaded at a local truck stop then use the tire manufacturer's weight chart to get the minimum pressure you should be running.
Mismatching Dual Tires: A Sure-Fire Way to Kill Two Tires at Once - Article - TruckingInfo.com

Running the minimum air pressure may not be prudent. Tire flex causes sidewalls to flex more and build up heat quicker. Goodyear states,
"Tire pressure should never be reduced below the vehicle manufacturer's recommended levels to support load conditions in order to improve the ride quality of a vehicle. The difference in ride quality is not significant."
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