Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > iRV2.com General Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-11-2012, 01:45 PM   #15
Registered User
 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne M View Post
Yes, 110psi is the max stamped on the sidewall of the tire. Heating is calculated into the tire by the manufacturer so if the tire is 110 psi cold it meets that maximum requirements of the manufacturer even if it is driven and the temperature increase the pressure. When arriving at destination and the temperature has increased by several degrees, and the elevation has gone up a couple thousand feet, the cold inflation may be over the 110 max psi stamped on the sidewall. It should be changed to read the correct cold tire max inflation of 110 psi if that is what one runs at. Cold inflation pressure is as the tire sits and comes to ambient temperature.

In the inverse, (decrease temp/alt) it depends on loaded weight as to the tire manufacturer's pressure specifications according to their table.

Sorry I missed the post a few days ago, I though it was a dead horse and didn't want to shoot it again.
Ok.. kinda thought thats what you meant ..
__________________

__________________
Midniteoyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-11-2012, 01:48 PM   #16
Registered User
 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by elkhornsun View Post
I would start with the tires at the maximum PSI for them in dual mode and start from there. Underinflated tires are going to wear faster and run hotter and be a possible safety hazard and you are going to burn more gas. After 1000 miles you can tell from the wear pattern whether it is advisable to reduce the pressure in any of the wheels.

When you get to a G rated tire it is not only able to handle 110 PSI, it is designed to be used at that pressure. Lower pressures may not cause the bead to break free but it will cause a lot more flexing of the sidewall and a lot more scrubbing of the tire as it is driven down the road.
1000 miles is not enough to tell by wear pattern.. And 'G' rated tires can be run with less than 110psi.. In fact, if you coach's weight doesnt call for it, running at 110psi , or over inflated at any psi, can actually hurt you while driving in the rain as you have less of a traction 'footprint'..
__________________

__________________
Midniteoyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2012, 03:12 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 230
I have 1000 more lbs than you do and I've been running my tires(same size) at 85 front and 80 rear with no abnormal wear for 25k miles.
HTH
__________________
sjholt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2012, 12:51 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midniteoyl View Post
1000 miles is not enough to tell by wear pattern.. And 'G' rated tires can be run with less than 110psi.. In fact, if you coach's weight doesnt call for it, running at 110psi , or over inflated at any psi, can actually hurt you while driving in the rain as you have less of a traction 'footprint'..
The tire engineers have a good understanding of the profile of the tire and 20 lbs. more or less is not going to radically change the profile on a 10-ply truck tire. With every new truck and each new set of tires I can definitely tell after 1000 miles if the tread is wearing evenly from edge to edge and I can spot scuffing of the surface from tire squirm caused by under inflated tires.

Funny that people buy into the chalk test where a chalk line is drawn across a tire and after a few yards you are supposed to be able to tell whether the tire pressure is correct, but it is not plausible that after 1000 miles with a fully laden truck or RV that tread wear is apparent.

A tire can be designed for maximum mileage or maximum traction but it is a tradeoff and truck HT tires are definitely designed to minimize tread wear.
__________________

__________________
elkhornsun is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.