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Old 05-05-2015, 10:06 PM   #29
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We recently had the opportunity to visit Texas (for the first time) and had a very pleasant and rewarding experience. Everywhere we ventured throughout the state we were made to feel welcome and appreciated as "winter Texans". Just one example: We were washing the toad at a local car wash in Bandara, and the owner happened to be on site when we pulled up to the wash rack. We began making conversation and when he found out that we were RVers and traveling through his state, he said the car wash was on him (and it took a while to get the Jeep clean). Needless to say we were impressed, but we found others, ie; campground hosts and RV service centers, etc, to be equally as friendly and hospitable. We will return soon!

Bronk
We spent a winter near Mission in the Rio Grande Valley. Had the opportunity to meet lots of nice local people there. They really treat you great. We were running out of LP and the local LP company does one half of the park one day and then the other half the next day. It wasn't the day for our half of the park but I caught up to them and asked what the possibility was for getting filled up. They said no problem and sure enough they were filling me up an hour later. Gave them a tip on that one.

That's just one instance of the friendliness and helpfulness that the local folks there display. There were many other instances also, like the park electrician who hooked us up to the park's cable broadband when we couldn't get a good WiFi signal and then said that there would be no charge (it's supposed to be $25/mo). "Just don't tell anyone!"

Our experience was that the locals were genuinely helpful and friendly and were a pleasure to interact with. I like how Texans pull over onto the right shoulder when making a right turn so as to not obstruct traffic.
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Old 05-10-2015, 02:54 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by psaint View Post
It doesn't sound like it was the Comanches that were the hostiles.
No kidding.
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:17 PM   #31
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I've always loved Texas and the people there.
I like their 70 mph speed limits on 2 lane roads and if you pull up on their bumpers, the car pulls over and lets you pass them.
I like the way they talk. If you find a real Texan, many have a perfect Middle Tennessee southern accent--like Davy Crockett and Sam Houston (Tennesseans) had.
I'm a native Texan and have lived in the eastern part of the state (Tyler), the Big Country area (Abilene), North Texas (Dallas area), panhandle (near Amarillo) and the South Plains (Lubbock area). Have extended family in every part of the state. And there seem to be many "regional accents" in the state.

So really, a "Texas accent" sounds different depending on where you are. In fact, growing up on the South Plains, I noticed that friends from a particular small town on the Plains had little differences in their accent than folks from other areas of the S. Plains.

My cousins who are Austin natives have a very different accent than my friends in East Texas. And cousins who are natives of Wichita Falls have a different accent than family in El Paso, where they sound more like West Coasters and have no "drawl." The upper Panhandle accents are different than south Texas accents. So, "Texas drawl" depends on where you are. Accents vary in every part of the state.

Mel
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:34 PM   #32
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We will be in Lubbock July 3rd for 2 or 3 days. From Lubbock down to Hill Country, Austin, and San Antonio area. Looking for any suggestions for most scenic route from Lubbock going south to the areas. Also any suggestions to see after arrival at destinations. I know all 3 areas have a lot to offer from my research. Your suggestions will be helpful. Thanks for any suggestions.
When you're in Lubbock, will you have time to make a run up to Palo Duro Canyon State Park? If you've never been there, it is a fabulous state park. Great scenery, hiking (take PLENTY OF WATER in July), and the great outdoor musical drama, TEXAS! I highly recommend Palo Duro!

In Lubbock, be sure and see the Silent Wings Museum, which is the national museum devoted to WWII glider pilots. It's really interesting. The American Windpower Museum is also an interesting place to see.

Another must-see is the Ranching Heritage Center at Texas Tech University.

The Buddy Holly museum is fun if you were a fan of music of that era. It's in the depot district which has great restaurants and live music on weekends. If you can catch a live performance at the Cactus Theater, you won't regret it.

From Lubbock to Austin, we go through Abilene. If you have time in Abilene, don't miss "Frontier Texas!" It's hard to describe it, but it's the most creative, sort-of-museum kind of experience I've ever had. Definitely worth a stop to see it.

Hope y'all have a fun and safe trip.

Mel
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Old 05-10-2015, 04:18 PM   #33
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I am originally from CANYON, Texas, home of Palo Duro Canyon State Park.

See Palo Duro Canyon State Park
I grew up camping in the Palo Duro with my family, hiking miles of the canyon and its fingers, playing in and around the creek (back when there was always water in it), gathering wild plums in hidden places my dad new about.

When I was in high school, my dad's old friend from seminary days came to see us from Oklahoma. His name was Bob Pinezaddleby and he was Kiowa, grandson of a Kiowa Chief. His wife, Rachel, was Cherokee. (Both are dead now, as is my dad.) Anyway, Bob told them about his grandfather telling stories of hunting deer, buffalo, wild turkey and other game in the canyon, gathering wild berries and making pemmican. Bob had always wanted to see the Palo Duro because of his grandfather's stories. Mom and Dad took Bob and Rachel to see the canyon the very next day.

Dad said that when they stopped and got out at the first overlook, Bob walked off by himself and stood very still and quiet for a full fifteen minutes, just looking out into the canyon. He turned around and Dad saw tears pouring down Bob's face. He'd had a very spiritual experience.

They spent the entire day hiking the canyon. They carried food and water and picnicked beside the creek under the cottonwood trees. My dad said it was one of the happiest experiences of his life because it meant so very much to his friend.

The Palo Duro Canyon is indeed a special place.

Mel
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:45 AM   #34
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I like how Texans pull over onto the right shoulder when making a right turn so as to not obstruct traffic.
It's a defensive tactic we learn for self-preservation.

Quoting "bamaman", in a previous post above:
"I like their 70 mph speed limits on 2 lane roads and if you pull up on their bumpers, the car pulls over and lets you pass them."

When anyone "pulls up on my bumper", I get out of their way before I get run over. Just sayin'...
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:48 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by MPH View Post
I grew up camping in the Palo Duro with my family, hiking miles of the canyon and its fingers, playing in and around the creek (back when there was always water in it), gathering wild plums in hidden places my dad new about.

When I was in high school, my dad's old friend from seminary days came to see us from Oklahoma. His name was Bob Pinezaddleby and he was Kiowa, grandson of a Kiowa Chief. His wife, Rachel, was Cherokee. (Both are dead now, as is my dad.) Anyway, Bob told them about his grandfather telling stories of hunting deer, buffalo, wild turkey and other game in the canyon, gathering wild berries and making pemmican. Bob had always wanted to see the Palo Duro because of his grandfather's stories. Mom and Dad took Bob and Rachel to see the canyon the very next day.

Dad said that when they stopped and got out at the first overlook, Bob walked off by himself and stood very still and quiet for a full fifteen minutes, just looking out into the canyon. He turned around and Dad saw tears pouring down Bob's face. He'd had a very spiritual experience.

They spent the entire day hiking the canyon. They carried food and water and picnicked beside the creek under the cottonwood trees. My dad said it was one of the happiest experiences of his life because it meant so very much to his friend.

The Palo Duro Canyon is indeed a special place.

Mel
Beautiful story
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Old 05-14-2015, 08:45 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by MPH View Post
I grew up camping in the Palo Duro with my family, hiking miles of the canyon and its fingers, playing in and around the creek (back when there was always water in it), gathering wild plums in hidden places my dad new about.

When I was in high school, my dad's old friend from seminary days came to see us from Oklahoma. His name was Bob Pinezaddleby and he was Kiowa, grandson of a Kiowa Chief. His wife, Rachel, was Cherokee. (Both are dead now, as is my dad.) Anyway, Bob told them about his grandfather telling stories of hunting deer, buffalo, wild turkey and other game in the canyon, gathering wild berries and making pemmican. Bob had always wanted to see the Palo Duro because of his grandfather's stories. Mom and Dad took Bob and Rachel to see the canyon the very next day.

Dad said that when they stopped and got out at the first overlook, Bob walked off by himself and stood very still and quiet for a full fifteen minutes, just looking out into the canyon. He turned around and Dad saw tears pouring down Bob's face. He'd had a very spiritual experience.

They spent the entire day hiking the canyon. They carried food and water and picnicked beside the creek under the cottonwood trees. My dad said it was one of the happiest experiences of his life because it meant so very much to his friend.

The Palo Duro Canyon is indeed a special place.

Mel
Very nicely written. Thank you for sharing this obviously special moment that someone else had experienced.
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:31 PM   #37
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Thanks for visiting my home state! Com on back and stay awhile!
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Old 05-15-2015, 04:48 AM   #38
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The only thing good about Texas is that Texans wouldn't want to live anywhere else. Thank God for that.
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Old 05-15-2015, 06:28 AM   #39
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Oh we don't mind living in other places. We just don't want to call any of them "Home". We love spending time and enjoying the resources of your beautiful state.
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:37 PM   #40
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I have lived all over the country, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Illinois, Ohio, Nebraska and have visited many other states. I can honestly say that I love Texas the most. The people here in Deep East Texas, I live outside of Nacogoches, are some of the friendliest people I have ever met. Having moved here from out of state three years ago due to a job transfer, I was pleasantly surprised at the old school values that we have here. People hold doors open for ladies, say please and thank you, and a man's word is his contract.
This is not to say that there are not fine people in other states, there are, but I believe that Texas is one of the last bastions of true southern genteel-ism.
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Old 05-18-2015, 08:45 AM   #41
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I am Texan--blood, bones, and gut. I married a Texas girl; my three children are Texas born. I love and revere my Texan heritage. It is something that I hold in high esteem. My German ancestors moved to Texas while it was still under Mexican rule.

I have lived in many places on this planet. I learned several languages just to adapt myself to the places, cultures, and peoples. This, I suppose, is a by-product of my heritage.
Aside from my celestial home, Texas will always be home home!

I thank all of you for bragging about Texas. I am a misplaced Texan as I live in southwest Tennessee. Had the volunteers not gone to Texas in its time of need, it may still be under Spanish rule. So, my hat goes off to the brave Tennesseans for their assistance. Aside from Texas, I would live no where else than Tennessee. Both states share a kindred spirit of giving until life is no more.

I write all of this to say "thank you" to those who have visited Texas and have recognized what it is. A Texan is not perfect but proud for the donations of those who have given their all to make this state and this country what it is.There is no country that is perfect, but the heritage that is ours to admire must be kept in honor of those who have made the U.S. what it is. There are a lot of nice places and people in this country, but DON'T MESS WITH TEXAS!
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Old 05-18-2015, 09:24 PM   #42
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I am Texan--blood, bones, and gut. I married a Texas girl; my three children are Texas born. I love and revere my Texan heritage. It is something that I hold in high esteem. My German ancestors moved to Texas while it was still under Mexican rule.

I have lived in many places on this planet. I learned several languages just to adapt myself to the places, cultures, and peoples. This, I suppose, is a by-product of my heritage.
Aside from my celestial home, Texas will always be home home!

I thank all of you for bragging about Texas. I am a misplaced Texan as I live in southwest Tennessee. Had the volunteers not gone to Texas in its time of need, it may still be under Spanish rule. So, my hat goes off to the brave Tennesseans for their assistance. Aside from Texas, I would live no where else than Tennessee. Both states share a kindred spirit of giving until life is no more.

I write all of this to say "thank you" to those who have visited Texas and have recognized what it is. A Texan is not perfect but proud for the donations of those who have given their all to make this state and this country what it is.There is no country that is perfect, but the heritage that is ours to admire must be kept in honor of those who have made the U.S. what it is. There are a lot of nice places and people in this country, but DON'T MESS WITH TEXAS!
All I have to say to that is Amen. I am a Texan by choice, my youngest is a Texan by birth and I am forever thankful for the kindness and love that Texas has shown myself and my family.
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