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Old 11-19-2012, 09:01 PM   #15
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Thanks for all the information and when I take off the oil inlet and see a white color is that mean a problem?

Friend's pick-up that was sold is a 2007 model.
That can either be simple condensation from not being driven long enough for engine heat to evaporate the condensation, or it can mean there is water in the crankcase. If the oil drain plug is loosened enough to get an oil drip (after engine sits a few days) you get a drip of water first if there is coolant leakage into the crankcase. Water is heavier than oil and settles to the bottom after a few days.
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Old 11-27-2012, 08:26 PM   #16
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Exactly right! With pickups one must exercise caution buying a diesel. "Bombers" can cut normal engine life by 75%. Just visit one of the diesel pickup forums and read what some do to their engines. I've read of some diesel pickup owners burning acetone in them because they heard it greatly improves performance. I would not expect to hear that from MH or MDT/HDT owners.
There is one factor to be considered. Sure a diesel engine has a much longer lifespan, however, the rest of the truck is no different than one having a gasoline engine, so the lifespan of "U" joints, steering components, engine accessories, etc must be considered, ie: how old is the vehicle.
Bombers is only done to diesel engine and not gas engines?

Thanks for all the help from everyone.
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Old 11-28-2012, 02:26 PM   #17
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Good deal or not?

2006 Duramax Dually 110k miles - $16900


2006 Duramax Dually 110k miles
There have been many different models and designs for the Duramax diesel engines over the past 10 years, unlike gas engines which change very little over the years. The 2006 LLY is one of the best of the bunch with the fewest problems. They sometimes have fuel system problems but much less often than earlier engines.

A big potential advantage of the LLY diesel is that it does not need ultra low sulfur fuel as it does not have a diesel particulate filter. This means you can use the non-ULSD fuel found in Mexico without any problems.

With diesel trucks there are injector problems which can cost $5k on average to fix and then there are problems with the cooling system, brakes, electrical, and other components as with a gas engine powered vehicle. For the majority of diesel engines in pickups and RV's the cost of the engine, beefier transmission, and additional repair costs over 150,000 miles of use has been $13,000 more than for a similar vehicle with a gas engine and standard automatic transmission. For confirmation do a google search on Duramax (or any other light duty) diesel and fuel injector repair and note the cost of the repairs and the mileage on the engines when this had to be done.

The value of a 2006 DRW Duramax truck depends a lot on the cab and trim level and options packages. A regular cab base trim level Dooley with no extra package options (4WD, towing, entertainment, navigation, fog lights, leather seats, etc.) will sell new for $20k less than a fully loaded truck with an extended cab or crew cab. The base level 2013 Chevy Duramax with 2WD and regular cab and base trim level sells for $34k with a full warranty.
When I was looking at used trucks last year all the regular cab trucks had been used as work trucks and saw much harder use than average.

If you can get an extended warranty for under $1000 I would do so with this truck as it is cheap insurance against possible future repair costs.

Diesel adds double the torque for pulling a load and provides better engine braking than gas engines but at a significant cost. With diesel selling for as much as premium gasoline at the pumps the cost for operating a diesel engine is even higher in the USA.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:36 PM   #18
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I have a friend that sold 3/4 ton Chev pick-up truck because he had 109,000 miles on a diesel engine. How many miles is considered alot for a diesel engine?

Thanks, Bob
I would not even consider that to be a lot of miles on a gas engine from years ago. That's usually when I bought them for cheap and then drove them for another 70000-90000 miles. These days most gas engines are just getting broken in at 109000. 200000 is the new 100000. Diesels usually run longer but, it depends on how it was used (like others have said) and on that type of engine.

Your friend was silly and not very smart. (Unless he knew there was something major wrong with the truck)
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:26 PM   #19
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This friend truck was in the Ford repair shop for over three months being fixed with new injectors because a gas station had water in their tanks. This Ford dealer said it took along time being repaired because of the Ford insurance claim.
Maybe this is why he wanted to sell?
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Old 11-29-2012, 10:05 PM   #20
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If it's a "real" diesel, say a Cummins, Detroit, Leyland, Mercedes or similar, 1.5 million wouldn't be an issue. However, GM made a lot of diesels that were really gas engines (either the Chevy 350 or 454) with diesel cylinder heads.

They didn't have the lower-end strength to handle 24:1 compression ratios and they are often shot by the time they make 125K. I'm not sure if the Ford diesel in the E-series vans and F-series pick-ups was a re-tooled gas engine or not.

The transit agency I was with for a few years had E-450 based small buses and the longevity/reliability was terrible.
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Old 11-30-2012, 09:33 AM   #21
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This friend truck was in the Ford repair shop for over three months being fixed with new injectors because a gas station had water in their tanks. This Ford dealer said it took along time being repaired because of the Ford insurance claim.
Maybe this is why he wanted to sell?
In your first post you said it was a Chevy.
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Old 12-03-2012, 01:03 PM   #22
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In your first post you said it was a Chevy.
My mistake It is a Chev repair shop.
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Old 12-05-2012, 03:30 PM   #23
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When I was looking to buy a truck last year I looked at used diesel trucks with less than 35K on the odometer as I wanted to maximize the odds of having a very expensive fuel injector or head gasket repair done under warranty. Diesel repairs to the main engine components are more frequent than with gas engines and they cost a great deal more to fix. Many diesels from Ford, Cummins, Duramax that have required $5,000 repair jobs within their first 100,000 miles of operation. By way of contrast I have put over 175k miles on my gas powered trucks and SUV's and the most expensive repair was a head gasket replacement for a Chevy that cost a little over $1000 in total.

The same gas engine design will be used in millions of cars and trucks over a period of 10 years or longer. This is not true with the diesel engines used by the three pickup truck manufacturers. Their engines change on average every 3 years as major problems need to be fixed or adaptations made to meet stricter emission standards. Since 2003 there have been 5 different Duramax diesel engines produced. Dodge/Ram and Ford have been doing the same so you cannot compare past reliability or lack of it with trucks from different production years.

It is also not only the engine but the cooling system, the electrical system, the transmission and drive train, AC/heater and other components that can and do fail and this happens just as often with a diesel engine as with a gas engine powered car or truck.

A diesel will cost more to buy, more to keep in fuel, more to maintain, more to repair than a gas engine. It will however provide up to double the torque for handling large loads and double the engine braking and this is why they are still desirable for use with RV's. Do not buy a diesel with the illusion that you are going to save money in the short or long run.
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Old 12-06-2012, 07:57 AM   #24
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When I was looking to buy a truck last year I looked at used diesel trucks with less than 35K on the odometer as I wanted to maximize the odds of having a very expensive fuel injector or head gasket repair done under warranty. Diesel repairs to the main engine components are more frequent than with gas engines and they cost a great deal more to fix. Many diesels from Ford, Cummins, Duramax that have required $5,000 repair jobs within their first 100,000 miles of operation. By way of contrast I have put over 175k miles on my gas powered trucks and SUV's and the most expensive repair was a head gasket replacement for a Chevy that cost a little over $1000 in total.

The same gas engine design will be used in millions of cars and trucks over a period of 10 years or longer. This is not true with the diesel engines used by the three pickup truck manufacturers. Their engines change on average every 3 years as major problems need to be fixed or adaptations made to meet stricter emission standards. Since 2003 there have been 5 different Duramax diesel engines produced. Dodge/Ram and Ford have been doing the same so you cannot compare past reliability or lack of it with trucks from different production years.

It is also not only the engine but the cooling system, the electrical system, the transmission and drive train, AC/heater and other components that can and do fail and this happens just as often with a diesel engine as with a gas engine powered car or truck.

A diesel will cost more to buy, more to keep in fuel, more to maintain, more to repair than a gas engine. It will however provide up to double the torque for handling large loads and double the engine braking and this is why they are still desirable for use with RV's. Do not buy a diesel with the illusion that you are going to save money in the short or long run.
I respectfuly disagree with everything said here.
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:52 PM   #25
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I have a friend that sold 3/4 ton Chev pick-up truck because he had 109,000 miles on a diesel engine. How many miles is considered alot for a diesel engine?

Thanks, Bob

Lets see, I would consider 6,319,782 miles as being a lot of miles on a diesel pickup engine. Give or take a few hundred thousand.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:33 PM   #26
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Looking at a GMC 2500 HD Duramax diesel engine with Allison Transmission. 4 door, 2wd, automatic with 99,000 miles. Price is 22,000 Good deal or not?

Thanks.
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:06 AM   #27
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Looking at a GMC 2500 HD Duramax diesel engine with Allison Transmission. 4 door, 2wd, automatic with 99,000 miles. Price is 22,000 Good deal or not?
Thanks.
Remember earlier in the thread someone mentioning "bombers" ? (people hot rod modifying diesels)
He are some ways to spot one or one that has been one in the past.
If you under the hood of a truck that has 99K miles ther eis going to some dirt, dust and grime under the hood. Does the factory air filter box, torbo charger and it pipeing look a lot newer/cleaner like it only has about 5K miles on it? THat may mean that it did have a hot rod part on it and it was put back stock.
Does it smoke black or blue at any RPM. on any truck built in the last 10 years Tuned to stock specs There will be no smoke. If there is black smoke it is turned up for perfomance. (At 10K feet in the rockies you might see some out of any diesel.)
If there is blue smoke there is wear.
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:48 AM   #28
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The person that owns the truck is also selling a truck camper which must be sold with the truck. This is sure luck for me because I'm buying a truck just for a truck camper.



Found out camper is 21,000 which is way more then I want to spend. Back to the search. The camper I have picked out already is only 9500.00

Thanks for the help.
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