Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > iRV2.com General Discussion
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-26-2011, 09:41 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
w6pea's Avatar
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Chula Vista, Mexifornia
Posts: 1,010
I used to get paid to drive in bad weather.....I don't have to do that anymore to make a living. (Retired Truck Driver) If it gets too windy or it's raining bad enough that the windshield wipers barely make a dent in it, and or it starts to snow......I pull over and stop.
Find a place to wait it out. I don't need to get there in an hour or so......it can wait.

Last year the DW and myself were driving north on US 395 north of Ridgecrest, Ca. We were at Coso Junction and I pulled in behind the service station there with a dozen Semi's and waited it out.

I watched a couple of people pull in with a Class-A with their awing flapping in the wind. They got it rolled up and drove away. after the wind died down we decided to go back to Ridgecrest, and spend the night there. On our way south there were 3 semi's that had been blown over on US 395.

We were going to go to Lone Pine for a couple of days at the BLM Campgrounds, decided to go to Tehachapi instead. The wind was worse there than it had been on US395 go figure.


If We Can't Haul It....You Don't Need It ! Motor-T
__________________

__________________
Remember "Without Truck's......America Stops" RVM129
"Take me to the Brig. I want to see the "Real Marines".
Major General Chesty Puller, USMC -
"Semper Fi"
w6pea is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-26-2011, 10:22 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by BudtheDiplomat View Post
My original post was to see if someone had a better idea than what I did (other than evacuation, of course) about lowering the coach not quite all of the way, using the jacks as 'stabilizers' instead of levelers.

Also, I wanted to hear your events, to see if other people had stories as involved!

The BIG ticket in what you said is the fact that your jacks are down. With any gusting winds the rocking motion created by the suspension system moving will assist the wind in rolling your rig onto its side. It takes something extremely strong to just push a rig over BUT if you can get it rocking then HIT it hard when it is in the rebound mode, over it will go.
Stop, get them jacks down hard on the ground a set yourself in a stable position. I recommend; on your knees with your hands clasped, pointing skyward while you talk to the BIG MAN UPSTAIRS.
__________________

__________________
Sidewinder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 01:02 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
sdennislee's Avatar


 
Monaco Owners Club
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 6,404
Why would the jacks be better the the tires?

Seems like the 6 tires would provide more contact area than 3 or 4 jacks would.

Is the suspension the fly in the ointment of tires vs. jacks? I realize the jacks will take the rocking out when living in the MH. The tires however sit out board of the jacks providing a wider base.

I have also read if the storm involves lightning you would want to bring the metal jacks up or have a substantial non-conductive layer between the metal jacks and the ground.

Does anyone have any data on this topic which shows the better of the two.

I've never had to ride out a storm in the MH. In the Navy we just pulled out to sea and prayed.
__________________
US Navy Vet, Liberty Tree Member of Oath Keepers, NRA & VFW Life Member, Alaska EMT.
2009 Safari Cheetah 40 SKQ
2009 Winnebago Chalet 231CR
sdennislee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 07:40 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdennislee View Post
Why would the jacks be better the the tires?

Seems like the 6 tires would provide more contact area than 3 or 4 jacks would.

Is the suspension the fly in the ointment of tires vs. jacks? I realize the jacks will take the rocking out when living in the MH. The tires however sit out board of the jacks providing a wider base.

I have also read if the storm involves lightning you would want to bring the metal jacks up or have a substantial non-conductive layer between the metal jacks and the ground.

Does anyone have any data on this topic which shows the better of the two.

I've never had to ride out a storm in the MH. In the Navy we just pulled out to sea and prayed.
Hi Dennis, you hit the nail on the head. The bouncy suspension creates the momentum to tip the rig over. Going back to my outhouse tipping years. It was always much easier to tip an outhouse if you could get it rocking. If it wouldn’t rock you weren’t going to get it over.
Lightning will always take the path of least resistance. The path of least resistance is around the outside of your vehicle and to the ground. That is why they put grounding rods on electrical systems in buildings. It establishes the desired path so you are not in the path of least resistance. Ever wonder why we don’t here of a lot of folks being electrocuted in their cars. When a car is hit, the lightning travels around the outside of the vehicle and to the ground. As long as you are not connected to that path you will be OK.
Ron
__________________
Sidewinder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 11:50 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
sdennislee's Avatar


 
Monaco Owners Club
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 6,404
Thanks for the explanation.
__________________
US Navy Vet, Liberty Tree Member of Oath Keepers, NRA & VFW Life Member, Alaska EMT.
2009 Safari Cheetah 40 SKQ
2009 Winnebago Chalet 231CR
sdennislee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 12:01 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Bo Walker's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 240
Once we were caught in LA in hurricane winds. I thought it just wouldn't be bad. I was wrong. It was bad bad. We stayed and waited it out. All was well.
Two years ago we were caught in a severe storm on highway 33 from Sylvester, GA to Cordele, GA. The road shoulders were to sloped to pull over. Besides, it was not safe to pull over. We must have been the only "from out uh town" people riding highway 33 that night. Because there was no traffic. The smart people stayed home. The wind was high. The rain was very heavy. The hail was hard and abundant. The lightning was often, close and very bright. We continued but, very slowly. We were towing a suv behind the mothorhome and there simply was no safe place to stop. The storm had lessened by the time we got to Cordele. Boy, were we glad to reach the north bound rest area on I-75, We hunkered down for a peaceful night. We later learned there were damaging tornados in the area that night. We are very thankful for God's protection.
__________________
Me & my Hun RVing for fun!
Bo Walker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 12:47 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
wa8yxm's Avatar
 
Damon Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 22,825
Well the best advice is of course to get out of the area.. However the question said "What do you do if you can not"

Know where the designated storm shelters in your area are... Know which buildings are storm rated, and get to them.

Also, Know who near you is a Ham radio operator because once the storm slams the area you won't have power.. But we might, You won't have land line phones, (Neither will we) you very likely won't have cell phones (Likewise) but WE still have communications ability.. I mean, less the storm wipes out half the US I can be sure of being able to talk to SOMEBODY, even if the storm takes out my antenna, the back up is in a protected area and it only takes me minutes to erect it. and then there is the back up to the back up and so on.
__________________
Home is where I park it!
wa8yxm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2011, 05:19 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 302
This discussion is part of what we're thinking about as we consider what we want for our FT coach. Motorhomes certainly have an advantage here, since we would be in the shelter and it has a generator.
__________________
David, kb0zke
Mercury Mountaineer towing mpg 181(both sold)
1993 Foretravel U300 40'
kb0zke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2011, 07:58 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Ragingbull's Avatar
 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Fleetwood Owners Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Cherokee, Texas
Posts: 406
DW and I lost a 28ft TT and tow vehicle in Hurricane Ike. We were literally within 200 ft of the waterfront in San Leon Texas when it hit. I was in the process of a rebuild on truck still hooked to TT when it came in. Lost both vehicles and much much more. Never again will I live around the coast! MH will always stay inland far enough away from Hurricanes. That won't prevent us from dealing with high winds,tornado's etc but at least we will pay attention to the weather and deal with those issues as best as we can. HM can be replaced. We cannot!
__________________
1979 "Vintage" Pace Arrow 28 Ft,
Ragingbull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2011, 10:12 AM   #24
Member
 
Tileman's Avatar
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Lecanto, Flotida
Posts: 44
My gas, propane and fresh water tanks are always full. The black and grey water tanks are always empty. My wife and I have a full wardrobe in the RV. The refer (only) is pluged into 110 and full of drinks and freezer food. Of course there's plenty of dog food for the boys. The only thing to pack is laptops and camera. I can be on the hwy in 10 minutes.

I've only encountered bad weather 2 times in my travels. On hwy 10 in Califonia a wind storm hit us. It was bad. We pulled into a rest area and parked behind a block building. A state officer pulled in and told us to stay there for at least 24 hours.

We were cought in a blizzard in New Mexico. Thank goodness for the CB. Several truckers told us what to do and where to go.

I guess if we were caught in a storm "Right now", I'de try to find a block building to hide in.
__________________
Tile Man
Tileman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2011, 05:40 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
New Horizons Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 203
Tropical storm night.

Our daughter lives in St Petersburg, Fl. We were headed to visit with them with a tropical storm bearing down on the Florida Panhandle. We drove through to arrive south of the storm. When we arrived Fort Desota park was closed. So we went to our daughters home and parked on the street. We stayed hooked up to the truck and set the emergency brake, chocked all the wheels on both the trailer and the truck and cranked up our Honda 2000. The storm changed directions and boy did we get all we wanted. The trailer, a 17 foot Casita was up and down all night. It was kind like being in a boat in rough seas. But we came through just fine. Stayed there a week on the street none the worse for ware.

The top wind gust at Tampa airport was 64 miles per hour.
__________________
Happy trails,
The Sundowners:
Jane and Chauncey, Plus the Cats: Backslash, EB, Stripes
chaunclm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2011, 07:16 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
C-PHartley's Avatar


 
Newmar Owners Club
Florida Cooters Club
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Venice, Fla.
Posts: 495
It seems to me that letting all the air out of the suspension and jacks up would make a lower vehicle, a lower center of gravity and provide a wider solid base for support. Tail to the wind if possible.
__________________
--Chuck
95 Newmar Kountry Star, Spartan Chassis, Venice, Fla
C-PHartley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2011, 10:30 PM   #27
RV Mutant #14
 
Wayne M's Avatar


 
Winnebago Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Freightliner Owners Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,203
The jacks down, as stated, act as stabilizers to keep the MH/TT/5er from rocking. Yes the TT's have stabilizers. The slides pulled in prevent a heavy pendulum motion from being set up. Think of your slides. How many do you have, and on what side. In my case, I only have two slides, but one is over 20 feet long, and the small one is 12 feet long. and they are offset. So wind coming in from the small side, and the big slide out, the gusts pushing on the small side, and the big side slide weighing down, is a tip over looking to happen. With the jacks down, the tires are still on the ground, so instead of 4 points, you really have 8 points (duals being one point, but wider).

I will always try to find a sheltered area if possible, but in all cases, jacks down to stabilize, slides in.
__________________
Wayne MSGT USMC (Ret) & Earlene (CinCHouse)
2015 Winnebago Tour 42QD
RVM14
It is what it is, and then it is what you make of it.
Wayne M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2012, 08:51 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
Graniteman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Everett,PA
Posts: 178
I would think air out of suspension, head (or rear) into the wind, slides in, and jacks down to just stabilize would be the best position for the coach. I hadn't thought about the lightning, but wouldn't putting plastic pads under them break the contact? I would think if you are in a campground in that situation you would also want to make sure all of the hookups were unhooked??


Has anyone ever put a ground cable out when boondocking?


This also reminds me of a pet peeve. We were traveling to Florida this past July in a horrible rain storm. Most of the traffic had slowed to about 40mph. Visibility was extremely low but you could see the vehicle in front of you. Out of the blue the downfall increased to the point of 10 feet visibility just as we started onto a bridge somewhere near Charleston, South Carolina. I had backed off to about 25mph with nowhere to pull off (besides the berm). I would also add that I still felt safe and had control of the coach with an ability to get stopped. All of the sudden a car stops in the middle of the bridge. Not pulling off on the berm...right in the slow lane a dead stop! Up until that point we were being passed by 18 wheelers who were traveling 20+mph faster than us. I was able to get stopped but the only thing running through my mind was one of those trucks coming up from behind on traffic sitting dead in the road. After laying on my air horn (fixed with the help of irv2)the car proceeded to the berm. Drivers never cease to amaze me. Christmas eve my nephew (18 years old) side swiped a lady who stopped in the slow lane (in the dark) because she wanted to exit at an off ramp that was backed up. She couldn't fall in at the end of the line, had to continue to the last possible second, stop and wait for someone to let her in. My nephew didn't know she was stopped and just missed hitting her from behind at around 60 mph. Thank God for his protection, otherwise the outcome could have been much worse. Guess whose fault it was? Okay I'll get off my soapbox.
__________________

__________________
The Collins Family
Travis, Kim, Richard, Rebecca
2 Yorkies(Sophie and Annie)
Graniteman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Storm destroys tiny chapel, family hopes to rebuild w6pea Just Conversation 1 09-07-2011 02:47 PM
Bad Water Filter??? RickO Class A Motorhome Discussions 12 12-08-2010 10:53 AM
Symtoms of Having a Bad Tank of Diesel Fuel Dr4Film MH-General Discussions & Problems 6 11-27-2010 07:52 AM
Bad Plug Wires Rocket Heart Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 9 04-22-2009 12:41 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.