Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > Just Conversation
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-27-2007, 12:59 PM   #1
Member
 
IronRick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Anywhere USA
Posts: 78
From the Sunday Chicago Tribune. June 24th. 2007


A pew or a canoe: Not a tough choice


Ross Werland

June 24, 2007

I see a sign, and it's telling me that many Christian males have lost interest in the standard version of what it apparently means to be godly.

Consider that the Barna Group, a Christian research organization, recently issued a report indicating that mothers are better stewards of Christianity than fathers in relation to families.

Further, Barna found, men are more likely to be "unchurched" than women, with males accounting for 55 percent of the category. Unchurched meant "has not attended a Christian church service within the past six months," excluding holidays.

Research also showed that more women pray at least once a week: 89 percent versus 79 percent. I don't know if that includes males praying: "God, please don't let my wife ask me to go to church again this Sunday."

There happen to be a few other religions in this country, so that helps explain why some people are unchurched, but some of it may involve how all this is measured.

The standards for determining that mothers were better Christian energizers involved attending church, praying, reading the Bible, participating in a small group, attending Sunday school and volunteering to help at a church.

I would guess that most of the people who do these things are wonderful Christians, but these acts say nothing about the spiritual reality. In large part, those things simply mean you're a joiner, not more holy.

Definitely among the unchurched, I think there are healthy alternatives to the pursuit of a higher being that apply in any religion. I know church is a great place to find religion, but there are better places to draw closer to the non-fiction author of all that wonderful creation out there.

Let's look at a theoretical Sunday morning. I have a choice: I can go sit in a church pew and, in a congregational monotone, recite words that I'm guessing many people don't even think about as they say them. Maybe it's just me, but it seems that a direct conversation with an all-powerful deity would generate a little more enthusiasm.

My other choice: I can hop in my canoe and paddle up the White River in southern Wisconsin and within minutes find an unspoiled spot that looks like it's right out of the original Garden, precisely as its creator intended it.

For me, the better option is to savor the peace-giving, faith-inducing wonders of nature, the official art form of the deity. This is a temple I would visit every day. And, not to speak for other guys, but such alternative methods of "going to church" could explain why at least some men who aren't showing up with the other parishioners.

When my sons were growing up, we held our own brand of religious ceremonies beside a campfire, where spiritual feeling was palpable, and talked in a Christian context about how Native Americans lived so harmoniously with creation and in awe of its architect.

I think my sons now are as unchurched as I. But they still love to camp. And when one of them called by cell phone the other day and asked me to tell one of the old Indian stories on speaker phone by his campfire, I knew that the great spirit must still be alive.

I may be unchurched, but I think God's voice sounds much clearer in his own back yard.

----------

rwerland@tribune.com

Copyright © 2007, Chicago Tribune
__________________

__________________
Rick,

IronRick is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-27-2007, 12:59 PM   #2
Member
 
IronRick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Anywhere USA
Posts: 78
From the Sunday Chicago Tribune. June 24th. 2007


A pew or a canoe: Not a tough choice


Ross Werland

June 24, 2007

I see a sign, and it's telling me that many Christian males have lost interest in the standard version of what it apparently means to be godly.

Consider that the Barna Group, a Christian research organization, recently issued a report indicating that mothers are better stewards of Christianity than fathers in relation to families.

Further, Barna found, men are more likely to be "unchurched" than women, with males accounting for 55 percent of the category. Unchurched meant "has not attended a Christian church service within the past six months," excluding holidays.

Research also showed that more women pray at least once a week: 89 percent versus 79 percent. I don't know if that includes males praying: "God, please don't let my wife ask me to go to church again this Sunday."

There happen to be a few other religions in this country, so that helps explain why some people are unchurched, but some of it may involve how all this is measured.

The standards for determining that mothers were better Christian energizers involved attending church, praying, reading the Bible, participating in a small group, attending Sunday school and volunteering to help at a church.

I would guess that most of the people who do these things are wonderful Christians, but these acts say nothing about the spiritual reality. In large part, those things simply mean you're a joiner, not more holy.

Definitely among the unchurched, I think there are healthy alternatives to the pursuit of a higher being that apply in any religion. I know church is a great place to find religion, but there are better places to draw closer to the non-fiction author of all that wonderful creation out there.

Let's look at a theoretical Sunday morning. I have a choice: I can go sit in a church pew and, in a congregational monotone, recite words that I'm guessing many people don't even think about as they say them. Maybe it's just me, but it seems that a direct conversation with an all-powerful deity would generate a little more enthusiasm.

My other choice: I can hop in my canoe and paddle up the White River in southern Wisconsin and within minutes find an unspoiled spot that looks like it's right out of the original Garden, precisely as its creator intended it.

For me, the better option is to savor the peace-giving, faith-inducing wonders of nature, the official art form of the deity. This is a temple I would visit every day. And, not to speak for other guys, but such alternative methods of "going to church" could explain why at least some men who aren't showing up with the other parishioners.

When my sons were growing up, we held our own brand of religious ceremonies beside a campfire, where spiritual feeling was palpable, and talked in a Christian context about how Native Americans lived so harmoniously with creation and in awe of its architect.

I think my sons now are as unchurched as I. But they still love to camp. And when one of them called by cell phone the other day and asked me to tell one of the old Indian stories on speaker phone by his campfire, I knew that the great spirit must still be alive.

I may be unchurched, but I think God's voice sounds much clearer in his own back yard.

----------

rwerland@tribune.com

Copyright © 2007, Chicago Tribune
__________________

__________________
Rick,

IronRick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2007, 07:28 PM   #3
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Socorro, NM (until ?)
Posts: 1,552
I believe religion and belief are two (and often seperate, things.

This is on my email sig...
"God is the great mysterious motivator of what we call nature, and it has often been said by philosophers, that nature is the will of God. And I prefer to say that nature is the only body of God that we shall ever see." Frank Lloyd Wright 1869 - 1959
__________________
Lorna is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
It's tough to stay 'faithful' when you're on the road... RVThere RV'ing Humor & Crazy but True Stories 1 09-28-2008 03:54 PM
Tough time for Bailey tmar10 RV'ing with Pets 7 08-04-2008 06:56 PM
Canoe Trip at the Spring Rally TTT1953 Northeast Region 14 05-29-2008 07:15 PM
5th wheel - how canoe mount? badbrad 5th Wheel Discussion 8 08-17-2006 01:02 PM
OK, Here's a Tough One... (sorry long post) Kevin D. 5th Wheel Discussion 4 06-21-2005 02:51 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.