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Old 06-26-2011, 12:58 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by jemma112 View Post
Thanks so much for all the info.

Another question I have is how long do the batteries hold out without being plugged in and how long does the water last. I see many have 6 gal. tanks. I don't think that would last for a shower?
This is very variable depending on a lot of factors. The best answer is simply that you need to experiment with your specific equipment and habits to see what your specific answers are.

Yes, a six-gallon water heater will work for a shower, even two if done very conservatively. Remember, that is six gallons of pure hot water, which you are likely going to mix with some cold water for a comfortable temperature.

Also, a military type shower, i. e. wet-down, water off, lather, rinse, water-off, minimizing the water flow to that absolutely necessary rather than taking a luxuriating shower makes a HUGE difference in water usage and hence duration.
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Old 06-26-2011, 01:05 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by jemma112 View Post
What are "BLM, COE" parks.

Do municipal parks have hookups?
BLM = Bureau of Land Management areas, mostly desert or similar, mostly in the southwest, typically open-range free parking, sometimes a nominal fee required, length of stay can vary.

COE = Corps of Engineers, typically campgrounds near lakes and rivers, managed by the COE, typically have developed campsites with hookups, hookups will vary from water, sewer & 50A at each site to no hookups at the site, community water & sewer, have fees comparable to state parks, fee can be reduced by age 62+ federal park pass.

Municipal parks will again vary as to hookups, some do, some don't.

The biggest factor that one deals with when doing extensive "camping" is variability and need to be flexible. There is no "one size fits all" in any aspect of RV'ing.
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Old 06-26-2011, 01:23 PM   #45
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Can anyone tell me if it is illegal to stay overnight at a rest area along the highway?
18 wheelers stay there all the time' RVs stick out like a sore thumb and there are patrol officers that hate RVs. and are afraid of the truckers, you will take a chance of meeting up with a TR Jones highway patrol officer like I did.
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Old 06-26-2011, 01:26 PM   #46
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Howdy MHingFun,
A shower: 1st you fill a bucket with water; then you take a large sponge, wet it and wet yourself; then soap ALL OVER; then use sponge to rinse off. The shower enclosure is just for looks..OR you unhook, drive to a water spigot and refill AFTER EACH SHOWER.. Oh yeah, when you finish the sponge bath use the water in the bucket to flush the toilet. Any water you run to 'warm' it up should be caught and used to wash hands or dishes..

Welcome to iRV2, the greatest, friendliest, most informative forum in 'ether-land'..

Smooth roads, clear skies & balmy breezes !!!!
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Old 06-26-2011, 01:59 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by butterbean
Howdy MHingFun,
A shower: 1st you fill a bucket with water; then you take a large sponge, wet it and wet yourself; then soap ALL OVER; then use sponge to rinse off. The shower enclosure is just for looks..OR you unhook, drive to a water spigot and refill AFTER EACH SHOWER.. Oh yeah, when you finish the sponge bath use the water in the bucket to flush the toilet. Any water you run to 'warm' it up should be caught and used to wash hands or dishes..

Welcome to iRV2, the greatest, friendliest, most informative forum in 'ether-land'..

Smooth roads, clear skies & balmy breezes !!!!
I would have to travel without dw if she was to control water that tight, we have 75gal with 35 gray water and we can hold out 3 days or 6 showers until we see water in shower no going down, that's long enough for us in any one spot, but the state parks often have dump so we just move the stuff outside away from MH and dump and return. We are early movers so have never waited for others to dump or have others wait for us..
Quartzsite here we come to test out our fresh remodeled rig
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Old 06-26-2011, 02:14 PM   #48
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Hello All,
1) I was wondering what is the average nightly cost for overnight stays?
Most campgrounds I look at are around $40.00 a night. It would be an awfully short trip at that cost.

2) Do I need full hookups? I'm still looking for my RV, either a small Class A or a Class C.
3) What differentiates the need for 30 amp or 50 amp service?
4) Do any Class C's have 2 baths?

I hope to retire in Oct. of 2012, and WILL have my RV by then.

I want to hit the road and see some of this beautiful country of ours.
1. ranges from 15.00 for nothing but a spot to basic 110 20 amp plus dump and water on a gravel lot to 40-100 for resorts that are truly luxurious and everything in between.

2. Not always. Our ratio of "free" (its never free when you consume resources) per paid night is 2-3 days no hook ups per one RV "resort" if Im being luxurious. At min dump and water. We can make a about a full week on the 100/50/50 and onboard propane. Tanks are best flushed when 2/3 or better filled and this is the optimum time to find a dump fill spot.

3. Concurrent high amp device usage is the determining factor USUALLY broken down like so- The need for multiple Ac units PLUS high draw appliances like convection microwaves & hair dryers= 50 amp

4. sorry cant help here.

For A single Ac unit and occasional convection oven/ microwave use 30 amps is fine.

I have optimized my energy and resource strategies over long periods of dry camping with multiple types of vehicles over many years- there are strategies you can employ for all the resources Water/ grey/ black/ fuel/ energy etc. Figuring this out is half the fun.




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Old 06-26-2011, 05:42 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jemma112 View Post
Hello All,
1) I was wondering what is the average nightly cost for overnight stays?
Most campgrounds I look at are around $40.00 a night. It would be an awfully short trip at that cost.
Depends on location and what the park offers. The closer you are to a beach, lake, or tourist attraction the higher the price. The highest price I have ever seen was $800 per day - when I first saw it I thought I must have read that wrong, they must have meant $800 a month - nope it WAS $800 a day. I've noticed that the Southern states tend to be higher than the northern states, with the highest prices being near Florida and California and the cheapest prices being in New England. (Has anyone else noticed this?) $50 - $80 is average for "upscale" parks in the south while parks of the same quality in the north are $25 - $40 range. I'm not saying these are any sort of actual average, they are just the averages of the prices of places I've actually looked at myself. I've heard of places as low as $5 a day, but have not personally seen any of them. And than of course thee is WalMart which is 100% free.

Also franchise resorts (KAO, Jellystone, NASCAR, etc) are going to charge more than privately owned parks, and privately owned parks charge more than public owned parks.

You have to ask yourself what you want in the park. Are you going to make use of their swimming pool, will you use their gym, will you use their laundromat, will you take part in their games and craft activities? If you want to use the stuff in the park, than plan to pay higher prices to stay there. If you don't plan to use the things in the park you can afford to look for a place that is cheaper. Campgrounds that are just for parking in are far cheaper than resorts with pools, gyms, ice cream socials, shuffle board, bingo night, mini-golf, etc. Look at every extra thing they offer and remember that the more they offer the higher it'll cost to stay there. If you are going to use the features than by all means go to the park which has them, I'm just saying don't go to a park which has features you'll never use, because you are paying to use them wither you use them or not.

Of course workamping is an option too. Work as a camp host and get free parking and hook ups, but that only works at places which offer this option and only for folks who like 20 - 30 hours a week of being a camp host for 4 weeks minimum.

And than you have options such as staying with relatives, or staying on farms in exchange for being a farm hand/stable hand. Picking blueberries and brushing down horses for a free place to park isn't a bad trade.

Sometimes you can find a back road to park on for a day/night, but I wouldn't dare stay longer.

There are some rest-stop areas in WAAAAY out of the way places, and you can park at those for a few days. I tend to drive past these real fast myself. I always freak out at rest areas off of the highway. They always seem to be in the middle of a forest on the side of a mountain, about to drop into a white water river (at least all the ones in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont are like that), and they all look exactly like the rest stops you see in horror movies - you know the type with a serial killer waiting in the bathroom stall carrying and axe... yes, I watch too many slasher films, thank you, and they gave me a irrational phobia of rest stops now... I have to keep telling myself "It was just a movie... it was just a movie...granted it was a really scary movie, and it looks just like this place, but it was still just a movie."

Along the Turnpike there are truck stops that allow RV parking, but I don't use the turnpike so I don't use the truck stops either....seen too many movies like "Duel" and "Breakdown" and scared myself out of staying at truck stops. (Boy, I gotta stop watching horror movies! LOL!)

How much you pay depends on where you stay, what you do, and the sort of lifestyle you have.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jemma112 View Post
2) Do I need full hookups? I'm still looking for my RV, either a small Class A or a Class C.
Depends. You have 3 basic hook-ups: electricity, running water, & sewer.

Ask yourself this:

Can I live without electricity? No computer. No lights. No TV. Yes? Than you don't need electric hook-up. No? Than you next need to ask yourself, how dependent are you on electricity? Do you need it only a little bit or do you need a lot of it through-out the day? If you only need a little bit here and there, say one or two TV shows a week, get your internet at Starbucks/etc via wi-fi, than you may only need a generator and solar panels and not need hook-ups. If you use a lot of electricity, or want electricity every day, than yes, you will need hook-ups.

Next is running water. How important is it for you to wash your hands in your own sink, drink and cook with water from your own tap, and bath in your own shower? If you use public wash rooms and public showers, and eat out at the camp kitchen or local fast-food places for every meal, than you may not need water hook ups, and get by with just using your storage tank when driving between locations. If you place to do your own cooking in your RV and bathe in your own shower, than you'll need water hook-ups.

Next is sewer hook up. What kind of toilet do you plan to have? Water flushing or composting? A water flushing toilet is going to need to be dumped from time to time so some sort of sewer hook up is going to be required, at least to dump it (though that's called a dumping station not a park hook-up). A composting toilet will have a bag or drawer that you pull out and change every few days and does not need a sewer hook up.

So, how much or how little of each type of hook up you need is going to depend on the type of RV lifestyle you have. The more of a "stationary house" lifestyle you have, the more dependent you will be on hook ups and the more boondock life style you have the less dependent on hook-ups you'll be.

You will have to decide what type of RV lifestyle you want BEFORE you buy your RV and make sure the one you buy is suited for your needs.

I'm a boondocker myself, so no hook ups for me. I'm very much living the "off the grid" lifestyle and sort of a bit more extreme than most. I have no electricity, no sewer, and no running water (though I plan to upgrade next year so that I will have the option to do so.) I either cook on an open fire (wood in a charcoal grill - no gas) or I cook at a relative's house or I eat at small cafe's. I use the internet at libraries and relative's. I use public bathrooms.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jemma112 View Post
4) Do any Class C's have 2 baths?
The only motorhome I have ever heard of which had 2 bathrooms was a 45' double decker Class A that had cost the owner $3million to have custom built.

I'm guessing you have never actually been inside an RV? Before you decide on this life style you should go to a dealer and ask to spend a few hours walking through all the models on their lot so you can at least get a feel for how SMALL even the biggest RV really is. It is rare for an RV to even have a full bathroom with a tub. The average RV bathroom is about half the size of the average stationary house guest washroom. Many Class C's have a tiny stall, which consists of a mini-sized shower, with a sink IN the shower and a toilet often also IN the shower, where it acts as a chair you sit on while you shower. In most RV bathroom you have room to walk in, turn around while hoping not to hit your elbows on the walls, than walk out. In other words fitting 1 bathroom in an RV is hard to do (and many travel trailers don't have bathrooms at all) and so fitting 2 bathrooms in an RV is almost unheard of...at least in the RVs I've looked at. I think some of the giant monster sized $300,000+ Class As have 2 bathrooms.

I understand your point of view though. I used to think RVs were HUGE inside, based on how big they looked outside, but than one day I actually stepped inside of one. Changed my whole view, esp the first time I stepped into the tiny claustrophobic bathrooms which are standard in most RVs! LOL! I will tell you one thing for sure: if you have claustrophobia you will never be able to live in a motor home!

It takes a while to retrain your brain out of house living and into RV living, and some people never adjust to RV lifestyle so go back to house living, but the rest love the freedom that comes with living in a small space: you have to downsize drastically! Only the barest essentials can come with you. At first you try to bring all your family heirlooms, and all your kitchen gadgets, etc, etc, but after a while you start looking at things and thinking: "How much does this weigh? Will it put my RV over it's limits?" and you grab a measuring tape and measure everything you buy to be sure you have a few spare inches to squish it into and eventually you throw everything out, stop buying new things, and than it's just you, 2 changes of cloths, a few favorite items, and the open road.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jemma112 View Post
I have loads of questions but didn't want to aggravate you.
I believe the best use of a forum is to either ask questions or give answers to questions. I admit my RV knowledge is somewhat limited and I'm still pretty new to all this myself, but if I know the answer to a question, I'm happy to answer it (of course I'll likely be doing more asking than answering myself!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by mythplaced View Post
When you plug in ALL the costs of class C or class A RVing, it is NOT a cost effective way to travel.
  • Depreciation on the RV ($5-10,000/yr on ave)
  • TOAD vehicle (depreciation, fuel, maintenance, insurance)
  • RV Fuel (7-9 mpg / $.35 -$.50 per mile)
  • RV Insurance ($75 - $150/ month)
  • RV Storage ($50 - $200/ month) (FT=$0)
  • RV Maintenance ($100 - $350 per month)
  • Camping fees (Free to $75 per night)


The Minivan/Motel/Cabin/Tent route is FAR cheaper...but as was said previously,

Its about HOW you want to travel.

For me the extra cost is worth it!

I had to comment on the reply. Uhm... yeah, about that... my income is $2,000 a year. No that is not a typo. TWO Thousand not twenty. I could not imagine buying an RV with a price tag over $5,000. My TOAD is 30 years old and I only paid $900 for it years ago. Fuel? I did not get into RVing to travel. I got into RVing because I needed a roof over my head to keep out the rain, ice, and snow. I became homeless in 2006 when a flood took everything we owned including our house. I lived under a 8x6 tarp for 3 years as a result of the flood. Storage? I'm baffled... what storage? Where? Why? This is my house, why would I put it in storage? Maintenance? For the most part I do it myself or I do without. Camping fees? Nope. The flood took our house not our land.

You seem to be someone worried about resale value and that sort of thing. Me? I NEED a roof over my head. The RV is not a vacation home for me - it IS my home. It is a roof over my head. So for someone like me why would resale value even be a factor at all? Why would I sell my home? I wouldn't.

Okay, so granted YOUR costs may include the things you listed, but you can't use that as an average for every one else, because every one else is different. Me, I just told you my income is $2,000 a year, your costs seem to be more per month than my yearly income so yeah, something's screwy with your figures. You are NOT taking into consideration that there are LOTS of DIFFERENT RV lifestyles out there. Not every one is using their RV as a vacation home investment, some people actually live in their RVs because they don't have any place else to live, because they can not afford a stationary house and for those of us in that category your figures just don't add up.

And yes, you are right when you said, it's about HOW you travel: RVing is as cheap or as expensive as you want to make it be.

But basically I just wrote a novel length post to tell you to look at how you live and how you plan to live in your RV and than adjust your spending habits accordingly. :P

Best thing I can recommend is that you write down a list of what you want out of your RV lifestyle. Full-timing? Part-timing? Full hook ups? Partial hook ups? Boondocking (no-hook-ups)? Eating out or eating in? Camping in the deep woods with only bears for company or sunning on the deck of a pool being served martinis? Getting out of the park and seeing the local areas or living up park life to the fullest with bingo and golf and shuffleboard every night? You have about ten million options available to you and can do as little or as much as you like. The sky is the limit and once you know what it is you what to do, you can chart out what type of RV you need and how much your personal version of the RV lifestyle will cost you.

Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
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Old 06-27-2011, 08:33 AM   #50
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Depends on location and what the park offers. The closer you are to a beach, lake, or tourist attraction the higher the price. The highest price I have ever seen was $800 per day - when I first saw it I thought I must have read that wrong, they must have meant $800 a month - nope it WAS $800 a day. I've noticed that the Southern states tend to be higher than the northern states, with the highest prices being near Florida and California and the cheapest prices being in New England. (Has anyone else noticed this?) $50 - $80 is average for "upscale" parks in the south while parks of the same quality in the north are $25 - $40 range. I'm not saying these are any sort of actual average, they are just the averages of the prices of places I've actually looked at myself. I've heard of places as low as $5 a day, but have not personally seen any of them. And than of course thee is WalMart which is 100% free.

Also franchise resorts (KAO, Jellystone, NASCAR, etc) are going to charge more than privately owned parks, and privately owned parks charge more than public owned parks.

You have to ask yourself what you want in the park. Are you going to make use of their swimming pool, will you use their gym, will you use their laundromat, will you take part in their games and craft activities? If you want to use the stuff in the park, than plan to pay higher prices to stay there. If you don't plan to use the things in the park you can afford to look for a place that is cheaper. Campgrounds that are just for parking in are far cheaper than resorts with pools, gyms, ice cream socials, shuffle board, bingo night, mini-golf, etc. Look at every extra thing they offer and remember that the more they offer the higher it'll cost to stay there. If you are going to use the features than by all means go to the park which has them, I'm just saying don't go to a park which has features you'll never use, because you are paying to use them wither you use them or not.

Of course workamping is an option too. Work as a camp host and get free parking and hook ups, but that only works at places which offer this option and only for folks who like 20 - 30 hours a week of being a camp host for 4 weeks minimum.

And than you have options such as staying with relatives, or staying on farms in exchange for being a farm hand/stable hand. Picking blueberries and brushing down horses for a free place to park isn't a bad trade.

Sometimes you can find a back road to park on for a day/night, but I wouldn't dare stay longer.

There are some rest-stop areas in WAAAAY out of the way places, and you can park at those for a few days. I tend to drive past these real fast myself. I always freak out at rest areas off of the highway. They always seem to be in the middle of a forest on the side of a mountain, about to drop into a white water river (at least all the ones in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont are like that), and they all look exactly like the rest stops you see in horror movies - you know the type with a serial killer waiting in the bathroom stall carrying and axe... yes, I watch too many slasher films, thank you, and they gave me a irrational phobia of rest stops now... I have to keep telling myself "It was just a movie... it was just a movie...granted it was a really scary movie, and it looks just like this place, but it was still just a movie."

Along the Turnpike there are truck stops that allow RV parking, but I don't use the turnpike so I don't use the truck stops either....seen too many movies like "Duel" and "Breakdown" and scared myself out of staying at truck stops. (Boy, I gotta stop watching horror movies! LOL!)

How much you pay depends on where you stay, what you do, and the sort of lifestyle you have.



Depends. You have 3 basic hook-ups: electricity, running water, & sewer.

Ask yourself this:

Can I live without electricity? No computer. No lights. No TV. Yes? Than you don't need electric hook-up. No? Than you next need to ask yourself, how dependent are you on electricity? Do you need it only a little bit or do you need a lot of it through-out the day? If you only need a little bit here and there, say one or two TV shows a week, get your internet at Starbucks/etc via wi-fi, than you may only need a generator and solar panels and not need hook-ups. If you use a lot of electricity, or want electricity every day, than yes, you will need hook-ups.

Next is running water. How important is it for you to wash your hands in your own sink, drink and cook with water from your own tap, and bath in your own shower? If you use public wash rooms and public showers, and eat out at the camp kitchen or local fast-food places for every meal, than you may not need water hook ups, and get by with just using your storage tank when driving between locations. If you place to do your own cooking in your RV and bathe in your own shower, than you'll need water hook-ups.

Next is sewer hook up. What kind of toilet do you plan to have? Water flushing or composting? A water flushing toilet is going to need to be dumped from time to time so some sort of sewer hook up is going to be required, at least to dump it (though that's called a dumping station not a park hook-up). A composting toilet will have a bag or drawer that you pull out and change every few days and does not need a sewer hook up.

So, how much or how little of each type of hook up you need is going to depend on the type of RV lifestyle you have. The more of a "stationary house" lifestyle you have, the more dependent you will be on hook ups and the more boondock life style you have the less dependent on hook-ups you'll be.

You will have to decide what type of RV lifestyle you want BEFORE you buy your RV and make sure the one you buy is suited for your needs.

I'm a boondocker myself, so no hook ups for me. I'm very much living the "off the grid" lifestyle and sort of a bit more extreme than most. I have no electricity, no sewer, and no running water (though I plan to upgrade next year so that I will have the option to do so.) I either cook on an open fire (wood in a charcoal grill - no gas) or I cook at a relative's house or I eat at small cafe's. I use the internet at libraries and relative's. I use public bathrooms.




The only motorhome I have ever heard of which had 2 bathrooms was a 45' double decker Class A that had cost the owner $3million to have custom built.

I'm guessing you have never actually been inside an RV? Before you decide on this life style you should go to a dealer and ask to spend a few hours walking through all the models on their lot so you can at least get a feel for how SMALL even the biggest RV really is. It is rare for an RV to even have a full bathroom with a tub. The average RV bathroom is about half the size of the average stationary house guest washroom. Many Class C's have a tiny stall, which consists of a mini-sized shower, with a sink IN the shower and a toilet often also IN the shower, where it acts as a chair you sit on while you shower. In most RV bathroom you have room to walk in, turn around while hoping not to hit your elbows on the walls, than walk out. In other words fitting 1 bathroom in an RV is hard to do (and many travel trailers don't have bathrooms at all) and so fitting 2 bathrooms in an RV is almost unheard of...at least in the RVs I've looked at. I think some of the giant monster sized $300,000+ Class As have 2 bathrooms.

I understand your point of view though. I used to think RVs were HUGE inside, based on how big they looked outside, but than one day I actually stepped inside of one. Changed my whole view, esp the first time I stepped into the tiny claustrophobic bathrooms which are standard in most RVs! LOL! I will tell you one thing for sure: if you have claustrophobia you will never be able to live in a motor home!

It takes a while to retrain your brain out of house living and into RV living, and some people never adjust to RV lifestyle so go back to house living, but the rest love the freedom that comes with living in a small space: you have to downsize drastically! Only the barest essentials can come with you. At first you try to bring all your family heirlooms, and all your kitchen gadgets, etc, etc, but after a while you start looking at things and thinking: "How much does this weigh? Will it put my RV over it's limits?" and you grab a measuring tape and measure everything you buy to be sure you have a few spare inches to squish it into and eventually you throw everything out, stop buying new things, and than it's just you, 2 changes of cloths, a few favorite items, and the open road.



I believe the best use of a forum is to either ask questions or give answers to questions. I admit my RV knowledge is somewhat limited and I'm still pretty new to all this myself, but if I know the answer to a question, I'm happy to answer it (of course I'll likely be doing more asking than answering myself!)




I had to comment on the reply. Uhm... yeah, about that... my income is $2,000 a year. No that is not a typo. TWO Thousand not twenty. I could not imagine buying an RV with a price tag over $5,000. My TOAD is 30 years old and I only paid $900 for it years ago. Fuel? I did not get into RVing to travel. I got into RVing because I needed a roof over my head to keep out the rain, ice, and snow. I became homeless in 2006 when a flood took everything we owned including our house. I lived under a 8x6 tarp for 3 years as a result of the flood. Storage? I'm baffled... what storage? Where? Why? This is my house, why would I put it in storage? Maintenance? For the most part I do it myself or I do without. Camping fees? Nope. The flood took our house not our land.

You seem to be someone worried about resale value and that sort of thing. Me? I NEED a roof over my head. The RV is not a vacation home for me - it IS my home. It is a roof over my head. So for someone like me why would resale value even be a factor at all? Why would I sell my home? I wouldn't.

Okay, so granted YOUR costs may include the things you listed, but you can't use that as an average for every one else, because every one else is different. Me, I just told you my income is $2,000 a year, your costs seem to be more per month than my yearly income so yeah, something's screwy with your figures. You are NOT taking into consideration that there are LOTS of DIFFERENT RV lifestyles out there. Not every one is using their RV as a vacation home investment, some people actually live in their RVs because they don't have any place else to live, because they can not afford a stationary house and for those of us in that category your figures just don't add up.

And yes, you are right when you said, it's about HOW you travel: RVing is as cheap or as expensive as you want to make it be.

But basically I just wrote a novel length post to tell you to look at how you live and how you plan to live in your RV and than adjust your spending habits accordingly. :P

Best thing I can recommend is that you write down a list of what you want out of your RV lifestyle. Full-timing? Part-timing? Full hook ups? Partial hook ups? Boondocking (no-hook-ups)? Eating out or eating in? Camping in the deep woods with only bears for company or sunning on the deck of a pool being served martinis? Getting out of the park and seeing the local areas or living up park life to the fullest with bingo and golf and shuffleboard every night? You have about ten million options available to you and can do as little or as much as you like. The sky is the limit and once you know what it is you what to do, you can chart out what type of RV you need and how much your personal version of the RV lifestyle will cost you.

Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Can't add a thing; you have said it all:
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Old 07-02-2011, 08:11 AM   #51
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And my apologies to the OP. We have gone way off topic here.

OK, I give up. What does OP and DH stand for?
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Old 07-02-2011, 08:21 AM   #52
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OK, I give up. What does OP and DH stand for?


OP means original post or original poster

DH is Dear(or darn) Husband, DW is Dear Wife, DD=daughter, DSIL= dear son-in-law, etc
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Old 07-02-2011, 08:38 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by EelKat View Post

I'm a boondocker myself, so no hook ups for me. I'm very much living the "off the grid" lifestyle and sort of a bit more extreme than most. I have no electricity, no sewer, and no running water (though I plan to upgrade next year so that I will have the option to do so.) I either cook on an open fire (wood in a charcoal grill - no gas) or I cook at a relative's house or I eat at small cafe's. I use the internet at libraries and relative's. I use public bathrooms.
With all due repect to the poster above, but I would have to say MOST RVers who boondock extensively, whether urban or wilderness, do NOT give up electricity (supplied either by the generator or adequate solar) or running water (supplied by our onboard tanks, conserved intelligently and and refilled in a variety of ways) or their bathrooms (again, our onboard tanks used intelligently). Boondockers certainly don't give up cooking!

The quoted poster has made choices that are absolutely right for him or her, but they are certainly not the norm. RV's are self-contained for a reason, and that reason is to allow us to live outside the campgrounds with all or most of our little comforts.

Some folks boondock virtually 100% of the time, and its by conserving their resources wisely, not by giving up everything.

Personally, I'm too darn old to crawl outside in the middle of the night for a pee
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Old 07-02-2011, 09:25 AM   #54
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Here in the Bar Harbor, ME, area you would consider yourself lucky to find a spot for only $40/night (single night basis). A typical full hook-up in an RV resort list at $50+ and waterfront sites might be $65-$70. But we are staying 6 weeks and paying less than $23/night for the same site - the long term rates are substantially less.

Other places we go are much less, but we are still finding that (on the East Coast) full hook-up sites in private campgrounds are running upwards of $30/night this year. Federal, state and municipal parks run somewhat less, but still in the $20's. Senior discounts help a lot, if you are over 62. Passport America helps too, if you adjust your itinerary to use places with discounts.

The odd thing is that motel rates are down in many areas, probably because tourist travel is way down. We can stay in a motel for about the same price as a campsite in many places.
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Old 07-02-2011, 11:16 AM   #55
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Very helpful and some quite funy

I would like to thank all of you for all the info.

I am trying to learn as much as I can from those who have been there and done that.

My sister and I went west a couple of years ago, and we saw all the Rv's in the state parks and thought what a great way to see the country.

We went to the RV show in Louisville, but ended up looking at mostly Class A's. They are just way more fun to look at and go thru. We brought two of our nieces and a nephew, who would go with us on occasion. Of course they want bunk beds with TV's, a bunk over the cab, a u-shaped dinette, TV and screen room outside, and big basement storage for bikes.

What I want is to be able to wake up to a nice cup of coffee, take a quick shower, and as someone said, not have to leave my "house" to go to the washroom. I wouldn't need TV or internet everyday. But would like electric to read or listen to music. Then again a fire would suffice some evenings.

I want two separate sleeping area's and think 1.5 baths is the best bet.
I have two small grandchildren, 2 and 9 mo., and would like to bring them to see the sights as well. Their parents may also come along. Also, my younger brother and his wife may come along. They have the five kids and their own tent but the outside shower and the bath & a half would be great.


So it will be different needs for different trips. But as I said earlier, I'm pretty sure that 1.5 baths, two separate sleeping area's are a must.
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Old 07-03-2011, 09:39 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by jemma112 View Post
I would like to thank all of you for all the info.

I am trying to learn as much as I can from those who have been there and done that.

My sister and I went west a couple of years ago, and we saw all the Rv's in the state parks and thought what a great way to see the country.

We went to the RV show in Louisville, but ended up looking at mostly Class A's. They are just way more fun to look at and go thru. We brought two of our nieces and a nephew, who would go with us on occasion. Of course they want bunk beds with TV's, a bunk over the cab, a u-shaped dinette, TV and screen room outside, and big basement storage for bikes.

What I want is to be able to wake up to a nice cup of coffee, take a quick shower, and as someone said, not have to leave my "house" to go to the washroom. I wouldn't need TV or internet everyday. But would like electric to read or listen to music. Then again a fire would suffice some evenings.

I want two separate sleeping area's and think 1.5 baths is the best bet.
I have two small grandchildren, 2 and 9 mo., and would like to bring them to see the sights as well. Their parents may also come along. Also, my younger brother and his wife may come along. They have the five kids and their own tent but the outside shower and the bath & a half would be great.


So it will be different needs for different trips. But as I said earlier, I'm pretty sure that 1.5 baths, two separate sleeping area's are a must.
Let me see; 1. and a 1/2 bath; three bed rooms; seperate dinning room'

I'd say start looking for a 60 or more footer.
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