Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > Just Conversation
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-03-2007, 11:24 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Birmingham, Al
Posts: 257
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationwo...home-headlines


Hurricane center chief issues final warning

A departing Max Mayfield is convinced that the Southeast is inviting disaster.

By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
January 3, 2007



Frustrated with people and politicians who refuse to listen or learn, National Hurricane Center Director Max Mayfield ends his 34-year government career today in search of a new platform for getting out his unwelcome message: Hurricane Katrina was nothing compared with the big one yet to come.

Mayfield, 58, leaves his high-profile job with the National Weather Service more convinced than ever that U.S. residents of the Southeast are risking unprecedented tragedy by continuing to build vulnerable homes in the tropical storm zone and failing to plan escape routes.

He pointed to southern Florida's 7 million coastal residents.

"We're eventually going to get a strong enough storm in a densely populated area to have a major disaster," he said. "I know people don't want to hear this, and I'm generally a very positive person, but we're setting ourselves up for this major disaster."

More than 1,300 deaths across the Gulf Coast were attributed to Hurricane Katrina, the worst human toll from a weather event in the United States since the 1920s.

But Mayfield warns that 10 times as many fatalities could occur in what he sees as an inevitable strike by a huge storm during the current highly active hurricane cycle, which is expected to last another 10 to 20 years.

His apocalyptic vision of thousands dead and millions homeless is a different side of the persona he established as head of the hurricane center.

Mayfield attained national celebrity status during the tempestuous 2004 and 2005 seasons, appearing on network television with hourly updates as hurricanes Charley, Ivan, Frances and Wilma bore down on the Caribbean and the Southeast. His calm demeanor and avuncular sincerity endeared him to millions of TV viewers seeking survival guidance.

And he argues that his dire predictions don't have to become reality.

The technology exists to build high-rise buildings capable of withstanding hurricane-force winds and tropical storm surge more powerful than those experienced in the last few years. Much of Hong Kong's architecture has been built to survive typhoons, and hotels and apartments built in Kobe, Japan, after a 1995 earthquake devastated the city are touted as indestructible, he said.

What is lacking in the United States is the political will to make and impose hard decisions on building codes and land use in the face of resistance from the influential building industry and a public still willing to gamble that the big one will never hit, he said.

"It's good for the tax base" to allow developers to put up buildings on the coastline, Mayfield said in explaining politicians' reluctance to deter housing projects that expose residents to storm risks.

"I don't want the builders to get mad at me," he said, "but the building industry strongly opposes improvement in building codes."

Consumers also have yet to demand sturdier construction, Mayfield added. A builder gets a better return on investment in upgraded carpet and appliances than for safety features above and beyond most states' minimal requirements, he said.

As a senior civil servant, Mayfield was prohibited from making job inquiries in the private sector while still in the government's employ. But he said on Tuesday, his last day in office, that he hoped to launch a second career as a consultant in emergency planning and disaster response. He has particular interest in a potential public-private initiative to mine natural disaster scenes for their educational value.

He envisions a natural disaster assessment service like the National Transportation Safety Board, which probes the causes and consequences of aviation and other transport accidents.

"If the NTSB finds some structural problem is the cause of an air crash, you would never see that plane continue to be built with the same problems," he said.

With natural disasters, though, the same mistakes that put lives at risk are repeated year after year in unsafe construction and inadequate planning, he said.

Mayfield said he also was pondering collaboration with advocates of tougher building standards and land use rules.

"It's not just about the forecasting. Whatever I do, I want to help change the outcome," he said, conceding frustration with persistent public disregard of federal and local government campaigns to boost hurricane awareness and preparation.

Even after the devastating hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005, he said, fewer than 50% of those living in storm-prone areas have a hurricane evacuation plan.

While he has been critical of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's response to Katrina's devastation of New Orleans, he warns against depending on the federal government after natural disasters. He was dismayed to see federal agencies handing out water and ice in South Florida after Hurricane Wilma hit in October 2005, when stores were open and tap water was usable.

"You don't want the federal government to be your first-responders," he said. "The government can't do everything for people and it shouldn't, or else you create a culture of dependence."

Mayfield praises the Florida state government for its well-oiled disaster-response program and steps toward improving building safety, in contrast with other states along the Gulf of Mexico that he says still have no statewide building standards.

Though Mayfield's name and face recognition are the envy of some presidential hopefuls, he laughs out loud at the notion of running for office.

"Oh, good gosh, no! That is just not my thing," he says.

At the hurricane center on the Florida International University campus, Mayfield will be succeeded by Bill Proenza, the National Weather Service's director for the Southern region. Home to 77 million, the region has "the most active and severe weather in the world," according to the weather service's parent agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Proenza, 62, began his meteorological career at the Miami office as an intern in 1963. As director of 50 regional offices and 1,000 employees in the Southern region for the last eight years, he has long experience collaborating with the hurricane center staff on forecasts and tracking.

"That's why I don't have any problem walking out the door," said Mayfield, declaring himself fearful that the mild 2006 hurricane season left those in the storm zone ever more complacent.
__________________

__________________
Jayco1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-03-2007, 11:24 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Birmingham, Al
Posts: 257
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationwo...home-headlines


Hurricane center chief issues final warning

A departing Max Mayfield is convinced that the Southeast is inviting disaster.

By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
January 3, 2007



Frustrated with people and politicians who refuse to listen or learn, National Hurricane Center Director Max Mayfield ends his 34-year government career today in search of a new platform for getting out his unwelcome message: Hurricane Katrina was nothing compared with the big one yet to come.

Mayfield, 58, leaves his high-profile job with the National Weather Service more convinced than ever that U.S. residents of the Southeast are risking unprecedented tragedy by continuing to build vulnerable homes in the tropical storm zone and failing to plan escape routes.

He pointed to southern Florida's 7 million coastal residents.

"We're eventually going to get a strong enough storm in a densely populated area to have a major disaster," he said. "I know people don't want to hear this, and I'm generally a very positive person, but we're setting ourselves up for this major disaster."

More than 1,300 deaths across the Gulf Coast were attributed to Hurricane Katrina, the worst human toll from a weather event in the United States since the 1920s.

But Mayfield warns that 10 times as many fatalities could occur in what he sees as an inevitable strike by a huge storm during the current highly active hurricane cycle, which is expected to last another 10 to 20 years.

His apocalyptic vision of thousands dead and millions homeless is a different side of the persona he established as head of the hurricane center.

Mayfield attained national celebrity status during the tempestuous 2004 and 2005 seasons, appearing on network television with hourly updates as hurricanes Charley, Ivan, Frances and Wilma bore down on the Caribbean and the Southeast. His calm demeanor and avuncular sincerity endeared him to millions of TV viewers seeking survival guidance.

And he argues that his dire predictions don't have to become reality.

The technology exists to build high-rise buildings capable of withstanding hurricane-force winds and tropical storm surge more powerful than those experienced in the last few years. Much of Hong Kong's architecture has been built to survive typhoons, and hotels and apartments built in Kobe, Japan, after a 1995 earthquake devastated the city are touted as indestructible, he said.

What is lacking in the United States is the political will to make and impose hard decisions on building codes and land use in the face of resistance from the influential building industry and a public still willing to gamble that the big one will never hit, he said.

"It's good for the tax base" to allow developers to put up buildings on the coastline, Mayfield said in explaining politicians' reluctance to deter housing projects that expose residents to storm risks.

"I don't want the builders to get mad at me," he said, "but the building industry strongly opposes improvement in building codes."

Consumers also have yet to demand sturdier construction, Mayfield added. A builder gets a better return on investment in upgraded carpet and appliances than for safety features above and beyond most states' minimal requirements, he said.

As a senior civil servant, Mayfield was prohibited from making job inquiries in the private sector while still in the government's employ. But he said on Tuesday, his last day in office, that he hoped to launch a second career as a consultant in emergency planning and disaster response. He has particular interest in a potential public-private initiative to mine natural disaster scenes for their educational value.

He envisions a natural disaster assessment service like the National Transportation Safety Board, which probes the causes and consequences of aviation and other transport accidents.

"If the NTSB finds some structural problem is the cause of an air crash, you would never see that plane continue to be built with the same problems," he said.

With natural disasters, though, the same mistakes that put lives at risk are repeated year after year in unsafe construction and inadequate planning, he said.

Mayfield said he also was pondering collaboration with advocates of tougher building standards and land use rules.

"It's not just about the forecasting. Whatever I do, I want to help change the outcome," he said, conceding frustration with persistent public disregard of federal and local government campaigns to boost hurricane awareness and preparation.

Even after the devastating hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005, he said, fewer than 50% of those living in storm-prone areas have a hurricane evacuation plan.

While he has been critical of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's response to Katrina's devastation of New Orleans, he warns against depending on the federal government after natural disasters. He was dismayed to see federal agencies handing out water and ice in South Florida after Hurricane Wilma hit in October 2005, when stores were open and tap water was usable.

"You don't want the federal government to be your first-responders," he said. "The government can't do everything for people and it shouldn't, or else you create a culture of dependence."

Mayfield praises the Florida state government for its well-oiled disaster-response program and steps toward improving building safety, in contrast with other states along the Gulf of Mexico that he says still have no statewide building standards.

Though Mayfield's name and face recognition are the envy of some presidential hopefuls, he laughs out loud at the notion of running for office.

"Oh, good gosh, no! That is just not my thing," he says.

At the hurricane center on the Florida International University campus, Mayfield will be succeeded by Bill Proenza, the National Weather Service's director for the Southern region. Home to 77 million, the region has "the most active and severe weather in the world," according to the weather service's parent agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Proenza, 62, began his meteorological career at the Miami office as an intern in 1963. As director of 50 regional offices and 1,000 employees in the Southern region for the last eight years, he has long experience collaborating with the hurricane center staff on forecasts and tracking.

"That's why I don't have any problem walking out the door," said Mayfield, declaring himself fearful that the mild 2006 hurricane season left those in the storm zone ever more complacent.
__________________

__________________
Jayco1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 03:19 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 182
It sort of makes you wonder why a developer would offer millions of dollars for a mobile home park on the coast in light of what this fellow is saying.

One of them is right. Let's stick around a few years and see which one it is.

I know if it was me in the park and someone offered close to a million for my place I'd sure take it in a heartbeat.
__________________
skipsor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2007, 04:33 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Bryan, Texas
Posts: 611
We all know it's al about money. People build homes in stupid places because there is a market to sell them. The hurricane region is no diffrent than a California fault line or a bears nest in Montana.

And this guy needs to take a chill pill. He can only guess what is coming. He will never know what is coming. IF he was that good he'd be buying winning lottery tickets instead.
__________________
charliez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2007, 05:33 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
chasfm11's Avatar
 
Texas Boomers Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: DFW Area, TX
Posts: 2,027
I guess the answer to this question is how much we collectively feel about how much the government should protect idiots from themselves.

Let's consider the seat belt laws. Initially, few wanted to consider seat belts a necessary thing and many still do not. The facts are that many lives have been saved because of them.

I see no difference with the coastal situation in the Southeast. Personally, I'm in favor of having everyone who wants to build on the barrier islands to be allowed to do so - after they are verbally read a disclaimer and made to sign a statement (just like CC&Rs) that they accept total responsibility for their actions, cannot sue anybody afterwards for problems that develop and won't get emergency help when the storms actually hit. Short of that, building codes and restrictions are needed to help protect these folks from themselves. At a minimum, they should have to sign papers that they must evacuate when the call to do so is broadcast.

I freely admit that I'm very risk averse. I'm the kind of guy who thinks even local shopping trips out to avoid, or at least have the fewest possible, left turns in the route. I'm all in favor of those who want to climb tall mountains in the winter time be allowed to do so but with the clear understanding that noone will come for them (and risk additional lives) when they get themselves into trouble. For me, the same is true for living in a mobile home in Dade County.
__________________
2000 Georgie Boy Landau 36' DP
2005 Saturn Vue toad
KF5-NJY
chasfm11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2007, 10:13 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Two Bit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Texas hillcountry USA
Posts: 530
I applaud Mr. Mayfield for speaking up.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">"You don't want the federal government to be your first-responders," he said. "The government can't do everything for people and it shouldn't, or else you create a culture of dependence." </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Unfortunately most of the population does believe and lives in this "culture of dependence" and fully expects the government to continue to bail them out of their troubles.

I will continue to be one of those in the other group who chose to NOT live in high natural risk areas, chose to maintain (at personal expense) adequate homeowners, vehicle, life, and health insurance, and not expect the government to spend billions to rescue me and rebuild for me, when my world at the beautiful beach, or on the breathtaking mountainside on the fault line, or on the rich fertile soils on the slope of the steaming volcano, is devastated by a natural calamity at no fault of my own. I also promise to not drive around the "road closed / high water barracades"

Let's get these disclaimers printed and signed by all those risk-takers so they will pay the cost, and not us.
__________________
Robert & Nancy with "Murphy the EOG"
Murphy has passed on, but Micah and Bogie have assumed the watch! 02 Holiday Rambler 5ver, 2015 Indian Chief Vintage. 98 Coachmen truck camper.
Two Bit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2007, 11:05 AM   #7
Moderator Emeritus
 
RustyJC's Avatar


 
Texas Boomers Club
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Cypress, Texas USA
Posts: 8,854
Just keep in mind that Houston is the 4th largest city in the U.S. and the energy capital of the world. Some of us have to work here since this is where our companies are headquartered and, therefore, our jobs are - unless, of course, someone would like to adopt me and support me in the manner to which I've become accustomed!!

Having said that, even though we live northwest of Houston (i.e., inland, away from the Gulf), I still carry flood insurance even though we don't live in a flood plain and our house (built in 1983) has never flooded. I believe that those of us who live in hurricane, tornado, wildfire, mudslide, earthquake (etc. etc.) areas do have the responsibility to do everything we can to protect our own interests.

Rusty
__________________
2016 Ram Longhorn 3500 Dually 4x4 CCLB, 385/900 Cummins, Aisin AS69RC, 4.10
2014.5 DRV Mobile Suites 38RSSA #6972
Come join us on a TEXAS BOOMERS rally!
RustyJC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2007, 09:49 PM   #8
Moderator Emeritus


 
Monaco Owners Club
Excel Owners Club
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Hangin' with Sacs and the Pins
Posts: 9,413
Kudos to all who posted above.
We live in one of the interior valleys of Cal. Today they announced that Corp of Engrs claim they do not feel one area is as safe from floods as they previously claimed. WELL -DUH...What changed from the last flood - besides nothing?
My commute would have been cut to 1/3 if we had moved to that area - but then - my parents and my in-laws didn't raise fools!!
People need to learn to be responsible for themselves - no matter how poor or how rich they are- or anywhere in between!
__________________
MM
*MonacoMama with the 2 Pins & SacsTC Nearby*
*2007 Monaco Diplomat 40' SFT<>2006 Chevy VortecMax Toad<>2006 Buick Lucerne Leading the Way*
MonacoMama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2007, 04:23 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
lwmuddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 185
Here in the Myrtle Beach SC area insurance rates have just gone up 300%.

They are building up the entire coastal are [Grand Strand]. They're building 7 more Mega hotel/Condo's, which will fill in most of the vacant plots on the ocean.

If you stand on the beach and look north and south all you see are mega buildings, which makes it look like Miami's ocean front properties.

Multi story, Stick Built condo's, only yards from the water, are going to take the brunt of any big storm surge coming from the east off the ocean.

Builders know what people want and apparently a million dollars is pocket change for many nowadays.

This hurricane season was a bust, contrary to what predictors said in 2005.

Even though hurricanes are prevelant is this area, many bupass it because of it situation.

Hugo in '87 did a lot of damage and was the biggest.

Needless to say we have just bought a little home in a 55+ community which is well inland from the coast and has a good history of avoiding serious damage from storms.

We considered many areas during our fulltiming the last 2 years and each one had it's bad point. Either too cold, too hot, tornado prone, earth quake prone and the like.

I don't rely on the Government for anything more then my Social Security Check. The rest of my life is up to me.

So many people today have no planned backdoor or escape route in the event of dissaster. They rely on UNCLE to save them.
Uncle is too busy banking money to help out much as has been seen in LA.

I was tought to be self reliant and Not to rely on others for what I need.
No body cares about me as much as me.

This area has few escape routes if a cataclismic event hits us during the summer.

Off season population is around 29 million, but in summer it can jump to well over 50 million.

You pay your money and take your chances I guess.
__________________

__________________
No more RV'ing. Sold it.
lwmuddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Issues with owning a Four Winds Hurricane rebelsbeach Thor Industries Owner's Forum 29 07-13-2015 02:25 PM
A Special Hooray for Chief John rockintom Excel Owner's Forum 10 09-13-2008 11:16 AM
CHIEF JOSEPH HIGHWAY INFO NEEDED OpaRon Navigation, Routes & Roads 4 08-11-2008 06:41 AM
Maryland Service Center Warning Greg I Workhorse and Chevrolet Chassis Motorhome Forum 29 07-01-2008 06:58 PM
How to reset oil change warning on dash info center? Old Snipe Freightliner Motorhome Chassis Forum 4 06-25-2008 07:16 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.