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Old 08-19-2006, 08:57 AM   #1
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This is to let you know of an upcoming LPB and PBS television documentary that I think will be of interest to you.

Christina Melton, an award winning Louisiana Public Broadcasting producer has completed a powerful documentary that will air within Louisiana on public broadcasting stations on the one-year anniversary of Katrina on August 29, 2006 at 8:00 p.m. It will air again in Louisiana on September 3, 2006 at 4:00 p.m.

For those of you outside of Louisiana, Washing Away will air nationally on September 7, 2006 at 8:00 p.m. CST (9:00 p.m. EST).

Washing Away: Losing Louisiana the story of Louisiana's disappearing coastline and how this unfolding crisis affects all of America - is told through the eyes of people affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. It is narrated by academy award winner, Susan Sarandon.

You can see a preview of the Washing Away at the following link. Scroll down to the bottom of the poster at the link and you can see a preview of the documentary.


http://www.lpb.org/programs/washingaway/


If you have the time, it would help if you could spread the word to your friends and contacts around the United States about this documentary.

Washing Away is a very powerful story that will help people to understand the depth of the connection between our south Louisiana culture, economy, and ecology.
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Old 08-19-2006, 08:57 AM   #2
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This is to let you know of an upcoming LPB and PBS television documentary that I think will be of interest to you.

Christina Melton, an award winning Louisiana Public Broadcasting producer has completed a powerful documentary that will air within Louisiana on public broadcasting stations on the one-year anniversary of Katrina on August 29, 2006 at 8:00 p.m. It will air again in Louisiana on September 3, 2006 at 4:00 p.m.

For those of you outside of Louisiana, Washing Away will air nationally on September 7, 2006 at 8:00 p.m. CST (9:00 p.m. EST).

Washing Away: Losing Louisiana the story of Louisiana's disappearing coastline and how this unfolding crisis affects all of America - is told through the eyes of people affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. It is narrated by academy award winner, Susan Sarandon.

You can see a preview of the Washing Away at the following link. Scroll down to the bottom of the poster at the link and you can see a preview of the documentary.


http://www.lpb.org/programs/washingaway/


If you have the time, it would help if you could spread the word to your friends and contacts around the United States about this documentary.

Washing Away is a very powerful story that will help people to understand the depth of the connection between our south Louisiana culture, economy, and ecology.
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Old 08-19-2006, 06:08 PM   #3
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Hi Don, Is this connected to the documentary many months ago where this scientist predicted that New Orleans would be approximately 20 miles out in the Gulf, surrounded by water in 80 years? I keep thinking how I'd feel if it were my birthplace and home.
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Old 08-19-2006, 06:21 PM   #4
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I have seen aerial photography from National Geographic from about 10 years ago and what it looks like today. The delta is disappearing and there is little that can be done about it save addressing the causes and mitigating the mechanisms that contribute toward the decline.

From the encroachment of salt water in the mouth of the Mississippi to the irreversible damage to the marshland and wildlife that live there the environment is taking a beating and it won't be long before it is a total loss.

Commerce on the Mississippi will still be the primary focus of business however ecology will continue to suffer. The river opens the center of the country up for many businesses and millions of people depend on this commerce every day of the week.

How will all of this play out in the short and long term? Should New Orleans just be allowed to flood and is it possible to move this metropolis to a location that would place it at least "at" sea level instead of below it?

The cost alone to save New Orleans will no doubt cost more that the entire infrastructure of the city itself. Perhaps the folks in New Orleans are going to become Venetian or will they seek to build a reinforced concrete barrier around the entire city.

The problem is severe and the solution is nowhere from being completely understood. New Orleans is so much more than just a city it's a center of culture that can not be allowed to disappear.

New Orleans is undoubtedly not the same one year alter after the hurricanes that devastated the city, can she recover to become a fraction of her former self?

I have been and always am interested in seeing what is going to happen to New Orleans, the Delta and the mighty Mississippi and I will certainly make it my business to watch this TV special about Louisianan washing away.

Thank you for bringing this subject to the forefront of conversation.
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Old 08-23-2006, 01:24 AM   #5
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As usual the media stopped covering this disaster and it's recovery progress as soon as people stopped dying.

This was a monumental disaster for the US and many people want to know what progress, if any, is being made in the recovery.

Being below sea level is not new. Holland, an entire country,has developed systems to keep out the sea.
Is America too poor to save one of it's major cities from impending doom?

Is the recovery too boring for the Media to cover because it lacks rape, arson and murder?

Where did the Billion's of dollars go that was to be used in the rebuilding?
Have then eaten it up doing "Environmental Impact Studies"?

Are the same Boobs in charge of the city and state as when the disaster first occured?

If they are "patching" levies will they survive another Katrina?

Has anyone called the Dutch for engineering advice?

I hope that this documentary helps to answer these and other questions that many Americans have.
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Old 08-23-2006, 05:21 AM   #6
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Are the same Boobs in charge of the city and state as when the disaster first occured?
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes.
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Old 08-23-2006, 08:02 AM   #7
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Don, just noticed this thread. I don't know if I'll be able to get the show or not.

Seems when I lived in Baton Rouge and did some geography study in HS.. the thought was that all of lower LA was created by deposited silt from the Mississippi River.. IOW, it wasn't there oiginally but grew as erosion from the upper Mississippi created vast amounts of silt. Has the silt stopped/slowed because of 'better' environmental management or possibly some sort of cyclical changes in the environment?

When I lived there (left in'58), I think I remember the area as growing.. not shrinking?
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Old 10-11-2006, 12:21 PM   #8
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by lwmuddy:
As usual the media stopped covering this disaster and it's recovery progress as soon as people stopped dying.

This was a monumental disaster for the US and many people want to know what progress, if any, is being made in the recovery.

Being below sea level is not new. Holland, an entire country,has developed systems to keep out the sea.
Is America too poor to save one of it's major cities from impending doom?

Is the recovery too boring for the Media to cover because it lacks rape, arson and murder?

Where did the Billion's of dollars go that was to be used in the rebuilding?
Have then eaten it up doing "Environmental Impact Studies"?

Are the same Boobs in charge of the city and state as when the disaster first occured?

If they are "patching" levies will they survive another Katrina?

Has anyone called the Dutch for engineering advice?

I hope that this documentary helps to answer these and other questions that many Americans have. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The progress is covered localy. Many people got sick of hearing about New Orleans nation wide. Mississippi was hard hit but much less whinning was done.

I do not believe it it the federal governments responsiblity to take care of the infrastructure of a state or city. What has New Orleans done to improve the levies? What has LA done? Nothing for years before the storms.

As for the people in charge. Negon, the New Orleans mayor was re elected, and the same governor is in the state. Millions of FEMA dollars were spent to rebuild the Super dome. That should never have been tax payers money.

The repairs to the levies will not hold another Katrina.
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Old 10-11-2006, 09:43 PM   #9
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Sept. is over folks, Oct. will be gone soon?
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Old 10-11-2006, 10:37 PM   #10
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by GreatWhite:
Seems when I lived in Baton Rouge and did some geography study in HS.. the thought was that all of lower LA was created by deposited silt from the Mississippi River.. IOW, it wasn't there oiginally but grew as erosion from the upper Mississippi created vast amounts of silt. Has the silt stopped/slowed because of 'better' environmental management or possibly some sort of cyclical changes in the environment? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You are correct. If you search through the forums here, I actually talked about this on another topic. I am from NO. The problem is the levees. When the levees went in, the water was channeled into a specific area and the deposits were no longer being deposited. It used to be that every spring, when the snow up north melted, the river would slightly and slowly (read gently w/o damaging anything) overflow its banks. All of the rotting debris, decay, etc in the swamps would be flushed out and the entire SE LA would get a cleansing out. This would all flow into the delta area (which used to be much further upriver and is pretty much gone now) and wash out. Silt deposits would be left building up the area. It was a circle of life sort of event. The locals prepared for this by living in raised houses (my childhood home was about 2 foot off the ground) Those further into the delta (aka Venice, Grande Isle, etc) would be raised almost a full story off the ground. This was life and expected, no tragedies. The levee system stopped this cycle. The swamps are dying and the delta is shrinking.

So, the levees were a big mistake in more ways than one.
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Old 10-12-2006, 07:43 PM   #11
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New.Orleans is probably a good example of our government(s)trying to maintain a major population/economic center (city)in the wrong place while trying to maximize livablity and economic vitality. I feel that the Army Corp of Engineers, aided and abetted by politicians at all levels, utilizes a "rubber yardstick" in many instances to justify huge expenditures for the "common good". Oh well, New Orleans has survived for many years with this mentality, and will continue to do so. Katrina was a significant "wake up call". While the Mississippi and New Orleans doesn't fit the mold, you all should go to the library and get a copy of "Cadillac Desert" to read. The Corps of Engineers, the Department of the Interior, certain municipalities, politicians and special interest groups have all combined their efforts to ruin a lot of our lands. While limited water supplies have been almost destroyed in the West, I believe that, with lots of water from the North, and occaisional hurricanes from the south, eventually the Mississippi will win.....
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Old 10-13-2006, 04:46 AM   #12
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I remember a commercial that implied, "It's not nice to fool "Mother Nature". In so trying Mom will always win out.
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Old 10-13-2006, 06:44 AM   #13
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I was born and raised in La., and lived in Baton Rouge most of my life. The last time I visited NO for anything other than sitting for a license exam before the FCC more than 20 years ago, was the 1958 or 59 Sugar Bowl.

The impression that I have of New Orleans proper, based solely on what I read in the papers or hear on local and national news, is that it is a crime ridden party city whose main attractions seem to be the French Quarter and restaurants.

Many tourists apparently go there for the food, not realizing that the whole of south Louisiana is rife with excellent restaurants with well known chefs. One doesn't have to go to NO to enjoy excellent Cajun or Creole cuisine, nor to enjoy the full pagentry of Mardi Gras.

Many, if not most of the major corporations that used to occupy the city have relocated, and the tax base has moved on with them. Others moved to surrounding areas along the Gulf Coast, or to outlying parishes (counties to you yanks) as jobs became available in those places.

At one time the city imposed a tax on workers who lived outside yet worked inside the city. That caused more of the working class people to move to where they could find equal or better paying jobs.

The city seemed to have become one dependent upon the Federal government and seasonal tourism for survival.

Many of the people outside of New Orleans have wondered aloud why the government is spending so much money to rebuild a city that will remain at risk of similar destruction each hurricane season. Some news sources have indicated (through interviews with economists) that the government could have purchased property on higher ground, and built new homes for most of the people affected by Katrina for far less money. I realize that would be a big life changing event for a lot of people, but so was Katrina!

There is consternation now throughout the remainder of the state because of the increase in home owner and automobile insurance rates. Those few companies who have chosen to continue writing policies in the state are spreading their losses out to policy holders throughout the state. In some cases homeowners who have never had a claim are seeing their rates rise to near 50% while coverage for wind and hail is being dropped.

In addition, Entergy of New Orleans (power company) has gone bankrupt and will likely require parent company rate increases across the Gulf coast. In addition, they will probably require some sort of Federal bail-out to protect stock holders as well as employee retirement funds!

Now, having said all of that, I don't want to be seen as someone who is anti-New Orleans. I am merely attempting to explain how the New Orleans disaster has affected the rest of this state, and even nation-wide, and to provide a perspective on how the "rebuild" is perceived by many people outside of the New Orleans area.
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Old 10-16-2006, 09:21 PM   #14
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The progress is covered localy. Many people got sick of hearing about New Orleans nation wide. Mississippi was hard hit but much less whinning was done.

I do not believe it it the federal governments responsiblity to take care of the infrastructure of a state or city. What has New Orleans done to improve the levies? What has LA done? Nothing for years before the storms.

As for the people in charge. Negon, the New Orleans mayor was re elected, and the same governor is in the state. Millions of FEMA dollars were spent to rebuild the Super dome. That should never have been tax payers money.

The repairs to the levies will not hold another Katrina. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Being from Minnesota, I can never understand why people want to live in costal areas which are so prone to flooding. Ever since HS I was told about NO's problem being below sea level and that some day it will suffer a major flood. Well, it happened, and the people are getting sued left and right for letting it happen. Despite flood control measures being built for decades, the city still flooded, and many say now that the control measures actually contributed to the over all problem. Hind sight sure is good.

If I lived on the top of a hill and the wind kept blowing my house down, I would eventually decide to move to a valley. Maybe it is time for the people of NO to "move" their culture to higher ground, or at least expect to pay for the expense of staying put themselves. I can't take many more increases on my homeowners insurance.
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