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Old 01-02-2014, 01:35 PM   #43
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Thanks Rusty.
The frost time line is similar to Michigan. We're looking for "Frost Free". If that's possible with global warming.
That's why we looked at South Alabama. Still have more places to research.
That's the point. Look at the elevation - Fort Davis is located in the Davis Mountains of West Texas. The climate data and elevation given is for Alpine, 25 miles or so from Fort Davis - Fort Davis is over 5,000 ft elevation and cooler than Alpine. Snow in the mountains is fairly commonplace in the winter.

Among other factors, climate in Texas will vary by elevation, distance from the Gulf of Mexico, etc. Pick the area that has the climate you want.

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Old 01-03-2014, 01:01 AM   #44
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I don't think there is anyone in BC right now. They're all here in Mexico


Hmmm, camping in the Yucatan peninsula would be lovely. That gives me an idea...
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Old 01-03-2014, 06:24 AM   #45
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By comparison, anyone wanting to retire to the Greater Vancouver area in BC, Canada's banana belt, we are faced with:

- 2nd highest housing prices in the world, behind Hong Kong.
- average detached home price in Vancouver over $1 million.
- average home price in areas just outside Vancouver, $550K-ish
- property taxes in the $4,000 - $7,000 range.
- prop. transfer tax when you buy, 1% to $200K & then at 2%.
- average income tax in of over 40%.
- sales tax of 12% on just about everything (PST + GST).
- highest gas taxes in Canada, approx. $1/US gal.
- tax freedom day currently June 1 in Canada.
- all taxes combined on average, 50% of person's income.
- and if I've missed anything, they will tax that too.

Clearly not a place for retirees to move to...

Here's what you get for $1.7 million in the City of Vancouver:

http://http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/03/06/vancouver-housing-bubble-absurd-prices_n_2822178.html We bought our first house near this in '79 for $74K but moved away in '81. Shoulda kept it I guess, would have been worth maybe $3 million now.

Many people in and around Vancouver simply bail out and move well away when they retire. I'd move to the US in a heartbeat if it weren't for the fact we'd lose our medical coverage. Sounds like almost anywhere in the US would be way cheaper than here. I like Oregon a lot, not too hot and not too wet & cold..
Yes that is Vancouver, but if you choose to live elsewhere in the province, things are much more reasonable. No different than say living in Manhattan vs some other part of NY, or San Fran vs other parts of that state. We also missed (for better or worse depending on who you talk to) the arse falling out of the Real Estate market in 08. That million dollar house is surprising still worth a million dollars. I am sure that many would love to say that their domicile is worth what it was 6 years ago. So, some good, some bad. At least if you are in one of the most expensive housing markets, most of your retire to other places options are that much easier and often allow you to put some money in your pocket. Oh and lets not forget that we don't pay Capital Gains taxes on our primary residences we get it up front with that damned Property Transfer Tax.
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Old 01-03-2014, 07:19 AM   #46
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Have been in FL for about 15 years. It depends "where" in Florida you decide to retire. I live in the Fort Lauderdale area and, given my druthers, I would probably move towards the Tampa area. Miami/Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach are expensive areas to live in. There is no income tax but they get you here in other ways. We have higher health and insurance rates then probably anywhere else in the country. Real estate values are rising. Traffic on I-95 is insane. And I won't even get into the politics of South Eastern Florida!

Mid to North Florida gives you the advantages of Florida with less of the downsides I see here
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Old 01-03-2014, 09:16 PM   #47
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Interesting thread. I am approaching 60 and considering retiring this year. I have had all I can take of Illinois winters. One place that we are considering, at least for 7-8 months of the year is the Tucson, AZ area, and traveling north for the hot summer months. The weather is good, low humidity, home prices appear reasonable.
That said, I have a lot to research. I just know we want to get the heck out of Illinois.
The high on Monday here in the Chicago area is forecast to be -10 with a -23 windchill. Enough already.
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Old 01-03-2014, 09:55 PM   #48
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Best place to retire is a tough one and very personal. It would be my strong suggestion to take your motorhome and spend some time in the place you are planning to retire in before making the plunge.

I personally like warm dry places and think parts of Nevada like Mesquite is pretty nice. I also like southern Utah. Both of those places are just down the Interstate 15 from Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho where you can avoid the summer heat and catch some fish. And when your motorhome needs repair you just take a left turn and go to the Eugene OR area for service.

As far as friendly I don't think you can beat Texas. They even put signs on the roads telling you to drive friendly. I spent quite a bit of time in Texas and it would be my opinion that this might be the friendly capital of the USA.

Florida for water. Nice modern State with lots of housing close to fishing, diving, and the beach.

I have no idea what a modern church is.
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Old 01-04-2014, 09:48 AM   #49
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I think we live in the perfect winter place in the central Texas Hill Country. Most years we barely dip below freezing a dozen nights or so, then warm up to 50 the next day. My problem here is the long long hot summers. In 2011, we had 90 days 100+ degrees and 155 consecutive days above 90 degrees. We are 45 min from downtown Austin and everything is moving toward us. Now we have a Galleria shopping center 10 min away. Luckily we have 18 ac.

I'm looking for a place at 5000+ elevation to stay May - Sep. I want at least an acre so the dogs have room to run, and will develop it myself, since that's what I do. If I really like it, I will build a house on it. My intentions are to spend a couple years looking and spending some time in prospective areas. I favor the higher elevations of the southwest. N. AZ is appealing but there is not a lot of private land, which drives the price up. I assume this is the case anywhere there is a high % of public land.

I was in Ft Davis, TX last Apr, and although it is a lovely place and it has the elevation, there is absolutely nothing there for groceries, medical, and the basics. It's out in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 01-04-2014, 09:55 AM   #50
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Yes that is Vancouver, but if you choose to live elsewhere in the province, things are much more reasonable. No different than say living in Manhattan vs some other part of NY, or San Fran vs other parts of that state. We also missed (for better or worse depending on who you talk to) the arse falling out of the Real Estate market in 08. That million dollar house is surprising still worth a million dollars. I am sure that many would love to say that their domicile is worth what it was 6 years ago. So, some good, some bad. At least if you are in one of the most expensive housing markets, most of your retire to other places options are that much easier and often allow you to put some money in your pocket. Oh and lets not forget that we don't pay Capital Gains taxes on our primary residences we get it up front with that damned Property Transfer Tax.
That's right on the capital gains tax. One of the best investments here is your principal residence. If you buy a vacation cottage, you can't escape it. If a Canadian is lucky enough to win a lottery or inherit a big estate (not withstanding probate fees), we don't pay tax on that either. When you see someone win a show like Survivor, they're only getting about $1/2 million and the IRS takes a big chunk.

Despite all the various high costs to live in BC and Canada, when you look at how bad the economy is around the US, we're doing pretty good in general here and are very fortunate to live where we do. And we don't get tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, firestorms, droughts, earthquakes or severe hot or cold weather. In the winter you can even golf and ski on the same day.
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Old 01-04-2014, 10:06 AM   #51
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We chose St. George, Utah for lots of reasons. Small town feel but big city conveniences and one of the top 25 hospitals in the country. Utility costs are among the lowest in the country and although there is a state income tax, property taxes and sales tax are much lower than most any place else. Remember, if you don't pay income taxes, they will get you with some other tax to make up the difference. Dixie State University offers a whole variety of continuing education classes for only a $40 fee (take as many classes as you want for the one low fee). If you golf, you can golf here year round at very reasonable prices on some of the premier golf courses in the west. The crime rate here is VERY LOW which is definitely a consideration when being a senior citizen. I-15 runs right through town and Las Vegas is only 2 hours away via I-15. I could go on and on but I think you get the idea that we LOVE living here for a lot of reasons. Here is a link to the St. George listing in the top 25 places to retire per Money magazine: 25 Best Places to Retire - St. George, UT (7) - Money Magazine
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Old 01-04-2014, 01:05 PM   #52
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That's right on the capital gains tax. One of the best investments here is your principal residence. If you buy a vacation cottage, you can't escape it. If a Canadian is lucky enough to win a lottery or inherit a big estate (not withstanding probate fees), we don't pay tax on that either. When you see someone win a show like Survivor, they're only getting about $1/2 million and the IRS takes a big chunk.

Despite all the various high costs to live in BC and Canada, when you look at how bad the economy is around the US, we're doing pretty good in general here and are very fortunate to live where we do. And we don't get tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, firestorms, droughts, earthquakes or severe hot or cold weather. In the winter you can even golf and ski on the same day.
If that's the case why is all of BC here in Mexico right now, complaining about the cost of living and weather at home LOL. BTW, the economy in the US is doing just fine right now. That's good for you as well because when the US has a cold Canada coughs.
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Old 01-04-2014, 07:19 PM   #53
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Thanks to all, we live in Northern Ohio now, we love our church, but maybe traveling 50% of the year and down sizing to a small country home instead of suburbia in a 4 BR-3 car garage home would be nice. Thanks for all the replies.

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Old 01-04-2014, 08:55 PM   #54
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Bella Vista, AR...but keep it a secret. Low cost housing, churches, activities, fishing, golfing, 4-seasons but moderate climate (except for the next few days), Culture...yes we have culture in NW Arkansas with Walton Art Center in Fayetteville and Crystal Bridges Museum of Art in Bentonville and very friendly people. We moved here two years ago from St. Louis and love it!
Forgot to add hospitals and shopping centers.
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:40 PM   #55
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If that's the case why is all of BC here in Mexico right now, complaining about the cost of living and weather at home LOL. BTW, the economy in the US is doing just fine right now. That's good for you as well because when the US has a cold Canada coughs.
A little overstated but here is what you can do the next time you hear one of those BC residents complaining. Just ask them if it is so darn awful, why do they stay? See what they say. It is expensive to live here and would I like it if cost less, sure, but on balance, this is a good place to live. An attractive city, lots of opportunities to do lots of things, mild weather year round, very modest crime rate for a city of 2 million, a decent medical and education system and so on.

Canadians talk about 3 three things. Hockey, weather and taxes. We seem happiest when we are complaining about one of those 3. If pressed on the matter, most of those complainers start backtracking quickly when asked about how bad things supposedly are. They may like the warmth of the Mexico Sun but just see how many would choose to raise their families in Mexico if they had to choose between that and BC. The fact that they haven't packed up should tell you something right off the bat. Is it perfect? No place is perfect but Vancouver consistently ranks very highly among top places to live. 3rd in 2013 according to Economist Magazine. 1st in previous years. This is among 140 major cities around the world. It's not for everybody and even I will probably move to a smaller community in the future. It just is getting too darn big for this old school mentality. I wouldn't mind paying less to live on a daily basis but I could do worse many times over in a lot of other places and most who live here would agree.
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:38 AM   #56
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Well said. As an New Yorker in exile now in Tucson, AZ I understand the sentiment exactly. I actually do have Canadian friends who have relocated here. The big sticking point for most seemed to be the health insurance but they found with the significant decrease in expenses they can afford better health care for less overall. Plus they seem to like the 360 days of sun a year
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