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Old 05-07-2012, 04:02 AM   #43
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never a worry, gary. i understand your point of view. many endeavors of mine have gone down the road of which you speak... one day i'll tell you about my s&b solar hot water heater rebuild mistake!

back to the point here. fridge has been running for many days now. metering gizmo says 148 watts. ice cubes cold and separate in the bowl. but top and sides of fridge are hot to the touch. first thing i think of is how much room was atop the dometic and was filled with insulation... now i'm only 2 in from the roof which in turn is barely a few million miles from the hot florida sun. hmmmm.

two ways(?) to fixit... bathroom fartfan 70 cfm, 1 sone, designed for constant running, 35.00, for the upper fan to vent the volcano out the top, two small pc power supply fans to stir things around in the compressor area. 2nd procedure is a nip and tuck.... the platform it sits on might be lowered 4 in or more for headroom insulation.
(sheesh, i can hear him already! yada yada yada) still, cost is under 350.00 for a new 10 cu ft purty fridge in black what matches oven and microwave. coooooold roots beer!
am

oh ya, the fans will need to run more than just while compressor is running.
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Old 05-07-2012, 12:00 PM   #44
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i was just thinking that if the ts activates at 95 or so, and the compressor isn't running, but the ambient inside the camper is over that and turns on the fans, running the fans accomplishes what?

there's much more planning needed. for example, what conditions am i looking at: 1, at home on shore power, 2, on the road, with or without power to fridge, 3, out in the boonies, again, with or without power to the fridge.

i still think the only time the fans ought to run is if the compressor is running. to refrain from messing with the fridge wiring, i'd have to do a dry switch mounted on the compressor (or tubes) and have it actuate at a temp high enough to truly indicate compressor-on temps, yet not be activated by ambient temps inside a florida/summer camper. i think, especially if running on batteries or solar, running the fans unnecessarily might be considered electron-abuse.

again, hooking right into the compressor power wires restricts fans to 110vac units. i'd like to keep my options open for maybe dc fans powered directly by a small solar system backed up by battery. this would necessitate using dry switch on the compressor.

howz that sound?
am
ps jb weld is right up there with vice grips, clippy-clamps and computers.
Well, then, check out the back of your new refer...there should be a schematic. Most refers, back when I was working with them, have terminals. Find a convenient place to wire in a 120Vac relay after the thermostat and across the compressor (before the start relay or thermal shutoff device). That relay could operate a set of 12V fans.

If you add a couple wires for a relay to the appropriate terminals, removing it if you have a warranty issue (not likely), would be easy.

It's not that hard to add a terminal strip to existing wiring to facilitate that extra wiring if necessary.

When you're out on the road or boondocking, dry ice or use a dedicated inverter.
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Old 05-08-2012, 06:24 PM   #45
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kicking it up a notch...

great ideas, everyone. let's get a seat on the shuttle and tackle the next item on the agenda: heat!

it may be an interesting episode to see some input to the following question about heat removal from the fridge closet. i'm not looking for exact science, but more of what d'ya think, charlie?

at issue is how best to remove the excess heat buildup inside the fridge closet. givens:
*2 in from fridge top to the roof. probably have heat coming down from the roof as well as that generated by fridge.
*1 1/2 in on either side of fridge.
*(louvered) access door behind fridge is approx 21wx14h. free (floor) space behind fridge 24w x 4d.
*typical roof vent from dometic days, straight up above space behind fridge.

so, if i put a simple 20" box fan behind the fridge, will it be more effective pulling air in from the access door and blowing it straight at the compressor area, hoping the air will find its way up to the roof vent,

or, aim it the other way, sucking from the compressor side and blowing out the access door, hoping to draw fresh air in from the roof vent....

just a little something to wonder about. also, how much moisture can be tolerated if the air is pulled in from the access door on a rainy day... or would a course filter stop it enough?

note: i'm not sure i want different plans right here, just want to evaluate which way to blow a box fan if placed behind the fridge. after i try it, i'll find it works fine, or it sux, in which case we go to discussions of plan b... ok?

am
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:59 PM   #46
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Question

While your working on the heat issue in the closet,you might want to look into if the frig needs extra cushioning for vibration going down the road.I honestly don't know if that would be a problem for the long term other than the time I spent working at Lowes where we where instructed by the manufactures to limit tipping them and certainly not to lay them on their sides.I do remember in the boxes there was more foam on each corner than god intended to anything for shipping.
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:00 AM   #47
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hmmmmm, vibrators? in my camper????

gary, so what's the diff between a fridge rattling around down the road in the closet and the two ac's on the roof getting the same treatment? both use mechanical compressors, right?

easiest way around it is don't run the fridge while driving?

even so, maybe just a quarter inch of something more resilient than the plywood it sits on, or the hard rollers and front feet it uses.

all that being said, i probably have a more extreme situation than most since i 'live' on the washboard back roads of the preserve. as it is, my current approach is idle speed for the few miles in and out. see more deer and gators that way too.
am
ps, about the tipping and laying it on the side... i think that has to do with the oil in the compressor getting into the wrong gyration. my salesman also told me that after carrying it thru the window, leave it standing vertical for a while before running. also said about laying it down in the car to carry home, if i was so inclined... every minute laying flat needs 2 mins of uprighteousness before running.

am2
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Old 05-09-2012, 03:13 AM   #48
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The roof A/C on my M/H in it's mounting has thick rubber isolators.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:03 AM   #49
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If I was doing this, I'd add two fans above the backside (inside the old vent hole left by the refer you pulled out?). That would draw cool(er) air near the floor from the front of the refer (that's why there's a grill there), over the drip tray (which evaporates condensation there that comes from inside the refer), around the compressor, up and over the coils, then push it outside.

The space you have on top of the refer should be blocked or insulated...

I don't care for the box fan idea. In an RV, you really need to pull the hot air up and out. Unless you mean a small one right in that louvered hole behind the refer, that might work OK.
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:33 PM   #50
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I am going to think out loud here for a second or two.

If your fridge compartment is like mine there is an access panel toward the bottom of the fridge to the outside that is vented and there is a roof vent. The original fridge did not have any vents on the front to draw air from the living space of the RV. The original fridge used the fact that heat rises to vent the compartment and to draw in combustion air when running on propane.

The new fridge is a residential fridge that has vents to the front and a built in fan to pull air across the evaporator coils and that air exits the fridge to the rear. If it is like most fridges I have seen that air vents to the back at floor level however some vent midway up the back.

With all of that stated I think I would block the outside access panel vent at the floor level and add a fan at the roof vent blowing out. This would help vent the hot air that the fridge has pulled across the evaporator coils out. This would help facilitate creating the "hot air rising" convection that the original fridge created by design.

Mike
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Old 05-09-2012, 06:16 PM   #51
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all that being said, i probably have a more extreme situation than most since i 'live' on the washboard back roads of the preserve. as it is, my current approach is idle speed for the few miles in and out. see more deer and gators that way too.

am2
I live just down the road in Caloosa.
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Old 05-11-2012, 12:57 AM   #52
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good thoughts, thanks. i hadn't thought about the air flow from front to back over the drip pan. result is to first try fans next to roof vent blowing out, and close off the old access door vents so air is sucked across drip pan, also cooling the compressor, instead of just sucking in from the door and right up the top, probably without doing much of value.

gotta find some rubber baby buggy bumpers to somehow cushion the whole fridge as much as i can. i've got about 130 lbs dry to contend with. the compressor itself is well cushioned, but what else in there would be adversely affected by the road? if not powered up, is the bumping still a problem?

caloosa? howdy, neighbor!
am
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Old 05-11-2012, 06:04 AM   #53
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The coolant its self......?????
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Old 05-12-2012, 01:06 AM   #54
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good thoughts, thanks. i hadn't thought about the air flow from front to back over the drip pan. result is to first try fans next to roof vent blowing out, and close off the old access door vents so air is sucked across drip pan, also cooling the compressor, instead of just sucking in from the door and right up the top, probably without doing much of value.

gotta find some rubber baby buggy bumpers to somehow cushion the whole fridge as much as i can. i've got about 130 lbs dry to contend with. the compressor itself is well cushioned, but what else in there would be adversely affected by the road? if not powered up, is the bumping still a problem?

caloosa? howdy, neighbor!
am
Don't worry about it to much. There are 10's of thousands out there with store bought refers running them off of inverters on the road or letting them ride without power for 3-4 hundred miles a day.
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