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Old 03-05-2016, 08:38 PM   #57
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I completed the job, replaced all 8 wires and plugs. The auto parts store looked up the recommended gap. I put thread anti seize on all plugs and used nylon ties to secure all of the wires in safe locations. The wires were generic for the engine I guess, they did not have the special portion to fit up into the distributor cap cover but it does push down on them.
You want pictures of the old plugs? I will see what I can do. Problem is my computer does not recognize my phone so I can not upload pictures to it.
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Old 03-05-2016, 09:16 PM   #58
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You may be able to upload with phone if you install the app.

That butterfly brings back the old days...

And make sure it is working as sometimes they bind up and restrict exhaust on that side.

With engine cold try to turn it.

Next with a pliers make sure engine changes when you turn it with engine running.
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Old 03-06-2016, 07:01 AM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glennj3cub View Post
Finally I replaced my spark plugs and wires yesterday. What a job, very difficult to reach some of them !
Anyhow, I should have done this a long time ago as I was instructed to do by several of you guys. I was surprised it even ran, much less was running smoothly! Bad gas mileage though.
Of course you are interested in what condition I found them in?
The first wire I pulled broke off leaving the plug cap on the plug, the plug cap crumbled in my fingers as I squeezed on it. Another one had a white spot on it (like it was burned through).
Now the plugs, oh the plugs...the gap was about .050, one looked moist like gas, not oil. None were burned or had bad color. The outside was very rusted and the metal tips were very rusted.
I replaced that little pipe from the manifold to the air breather, the old one was hard and did not fit well.
Of interest, while underneath the RV I saw on the driver side at the exhaust connection a heat sensitive valve I believe it opens when warmed up. Looks like it pushes heat up a small metal tube to ward maybe the carburetor ? Anyhow that metal tube was rusted with open areas to the air. The rest of the tube is strong and looks good.
Thought I might wrap the open area with some sort of exhaust tape ??
Still looking for the fuel filter!
She cranked up and ran fine, now I need to test drive her. Hope she gets better mileage too!
Go back and read my post #22 for fuel filter location.
The exhaust valve you saw is known as a heat riser valve. Later they became known as EFE valves. (Early Fuel Evaporation) The early valves had a thermal spring mounted on the valve shaft which wound the valve closed when cold. There was also a weight attacked to the end of the valve shaft. As the engine warmed up the spring tension lessened and the weight forced the shaft to turn allowing the butterfly inside the valve to open and allow full exhaust flow out of the manifold. Later designs used a vacuum diaphragm mounted on a bracket attached to the manifold and a rod going from the diaphragm to the valve. The vacuum was routed through a thermal switch usually located near the thermostat housing on the intake manifold. The vacuum would pull the diaphragm closing the valve when the engine was cold and as the engine warmed up vacuum would drop off allowing the valve to open.
The reason for these valves was to prevent carburetor icing in colder weather. Especially cold high humidity days. I have seen cars and trucks stall to a stop because the carbs froze up. Let the vehicle sit a couple minutes and the engine heat would warm the carb enough to thaw it out and the engine would restart and run fine. When the valve is shut the exhaust would be forced up through the port in the cylinder head through a passage in the intake manifold directly under the carburetor and warm the carburetor to prevent the icing.
It is important that the heat riser valve is free and will be open when the engine is hot. If it is stuck shut the exhaust valves on the two center cylinders will be exposed to tremendous heat all the while the engine is running eventually resulting in burnt valves and possible valve seat burning. The high heat under the carb after engine warm up can also result in vapor lock as the high heat can actually boil gas in the float bowl introducing air bubbles into the gas.
Be sure the valve is free and operating correctly. Do not just grab the shaft and force it if the valve shaft is rusted in place. More than likely you will snap the shaft off and you will need to buy a new valve and have it installed. Sometimes the shafts can be freed with a good dousing of penetrating fluid and being patient when trying to wiggle the valve free. Just don't force it.
Lynn
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Old 03-06-2016, 06:17 PM   #60
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Tony, Lori and Lynn, You guys got it! I was underneath again today looking for the fuel filter (no luck). I checked that valve again, it is of course rusty but I could turn it with my hands, the only resistance was felt like a spring under tension. I did not think about cranking her and re checking it, maybe tomorrow. The little pipe going up is rusted enough to have openings to the air. I will take care of that next.
Still working on the cruse control !


Thanks!
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Old 03-07-2016, 05:29 AM   #61
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You are lucky the valve moves freely. Let's keep it that way. Give each end of the shaft a squirt of penetrating oil every now and then and work the valve by hand to keep it in working condition.
Lynn
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Old 03-07-2016, 01:12 PM   #62
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I should also add that this heated passage also supplies heat to the thermostatic choke coil which causes the coil to lose tension as it warms and allows the choke plate in the top of the carburetor to open.
If heat isn't transferred properly the choke will tend to stay shut or partially shut causing a rich mixture. It will destroy mileage and eventually foul spark plugs out.
If the heat riser sticks open the choke will be slow to release or not release at all. If the heat riser is stuck shut the choke may release too soon and cause a stumble or stall when the engine is warming up. The whole system has to work together for best runability.
Lynn
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Old 03-07-2016, 01:52 PM   #63
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So true they work together after I replaced my coil 2 times I put a electric choke on mine
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Old 03-22-2016, 02:00 PM   #64
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Started skipping again while driving home one evening. Found the right rear plug wire had melted off.
Was able to repair it and put a sleeve of fiberglass insulation over it and a couple more to be safe. Very tight area down there between the exhaust manifold!
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