Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > Vintage RV's
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-12-2014, 02:04 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Wbonsell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Poulsbo, WA
Posts: 429
Active repair vs Proactive replacement.

I admit to struggling a bit with the question of whether to wait for something to fail vs doing a replacement of aged components prior to their actual failure.

I am the 2nd owner of my 34 Bounder which I acquired earlier this year. Originally purchased in Seattle but rarely driven as it had only 3375 miles on the odometer, it was extensively updated prior to my purchase. New carpeting, flooring, window coverings, microwave, batteries and most all fluids replaced. We did have to spring for new tires.

We have since taken 3 trips totaling about 1400 miles without issue. Our brakes appear good (per Les Schwab when the tires were replaced). We are getting ready to depart in less than 2 months for a 6 month journey down the West coast. I am planning on installing a tranny cooler but other than that, there are certainly other items which could be replaced prior to a failure...such as engine water pump, fuel pump and all belts and hoses. Much of this has been inspected and appears fine.

I guess the issue is...is one wise to proactively replace items or simply carry a few spares and deal with it on the road...assuming breakdowns will occur?

Performing preventative maintenance on a car is one thing. And I would not normally be inclined to replace components prior to failure. But, a motor home may be different. Would certainly like to hear opinions from anyone who has had to deal with some of the same concerns. Or am I just be overly worried?

Thanks....Bill
__________________

__________________
Bill and Debb---2010 CT Coachworks Siena 35V
1999 Jeep Cherokee Sport---Roadmaster Falcon 5250 -
1 Cavalon (Scooby)
Wbonsell is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-12-2014, 02:13 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Burnaby BC
Posts: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wbonsell View Post
I admit to struggling a bit with the question of whether to wait for something to fail vs doing a replacement of aged components prior to their actual failure.

I am the 2nd owner of my 34 Bounder which I acquired earlier this year. Originally purchased in Seattle but rarely driven as it had only 3375 miles on the odometer, it was extensively updated prior to my purchase. New carpeting, flooring, window coverings, microwave, batteries and most all fluids replaced. We did have to spring for new tires.

We have since taken 3 trips totaling about 1400 miles without issue. Our brakes appear good (per Les Schwab when the tires were replaced). We are getting ready to depart in less than 2 months for a 6 month journey down the West coast. I am planning on installing a tranny cooler but other than that, there are certainly other items which could be replaced prior to a failure...such as engine water pump, fuel pump and all belts and hoses. Much of this has been inspected and appears fine.

I guess the issue is...is one wise to proactively replace items or simply carry a few spares and deal with it on the road...assuming breakdowns will occur?

Performing preventative maintenance on a car is one thing. And I would not normally be inclined to replace components prior to failure. But, a motor home may be different. Would certainly like to hear opinions from anyone who has had to deal with some of the same concerns. Or am I just be overly worried?

Thanks....Bill
Bill, don't know what you do for a living, but you'd make a pretty good Risk Manager! Were I in your position, I'd be inclined to wait and see, but be prepared. Maybe carry the critical spare parts, Just In Case?

Cheers,
Nick B
__________________

__________________
Nick B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2014, 06:05 PM   #3
Senior Member


 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,282
I would get coachnet or good Sam or another good roadside assistance plan, and then not worry as much. Many parts will give some warning of impending failure (bearings making noise, etc) many will fail silently.....don't sweat it. Get out in the fresh air, sip your beverage of choice, and smile.

Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByiRV2 - RV Forum1413155063.779687.jpg
Views:	32
Size:	654.0 KB
ID:	76408

Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByiRV2 - RV Forum1413155121.539119.jpg
Views:	34
Size:	419.1 KB
ID:	76409
__________________
pasdad1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2014, 06:22 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 5,957
I would worry about anything rubber than can age out. Probably stick a spare set of belts and hoses in the storage if there is nothing showing obvious wear. OTOH whoever cleaned up the unit might have had the same idea so I'd take a look at what was there first. ;-)
__________________
nothermark is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2014, 06:43 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
MattC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wbonsell View Post
I admit to struggling a bit with the question of whether to wait for something to fail vs doing a replacement of aged components prior to their actual failure.

I am the 2nd owner of my 34 Bounder which I acquired earlier this year. Originally purchased in Seattle but rarely driven as it had only 3375 miles on the odometer, it was extensively updated prior to my purchase. New carpeting, flooring, window coverings, microwave, batteries and most all fluids replaced. We did have to spring for new tires.

We have since taken 3 trips totaling about 1400 miles without issue. Our brakes appear good (per Les Schwab when the tires were replaced). We are getting ready to depart in less than 2 months for a 6 month journey down the West coast. I am planning on installing a tranny cooler but other than that, there are certainly other items which could be replaced prior to a failure...such as engine water pump, fuel pump and all belts and hoses. Much of this has been inspected and appears fine.

I guess the issue is...is one wise to proactively replace items or simply carry a few spares and deal with it on the road...assuming breakdowns will occur?

Performing preventative maintenance on a car is one thing. And I would not normally be inclined to replace components prior to failure. But, a motor home may be different. Would certainly like to hear opinions from anyone who has had to deal with some of the same concerns. Or am I just be overly worried?

Thanks....Bill
Bill,

I am sure glad that you have a head on your shoulders.....
As a member of a group comprised of coaches that are 40odd years old, let me start the list here:

I will assume (hope) you know that tires have a life of about seven years - on the shelf is worse than on the road. After six years they have a half life of about 15 months. So, there are almost none left at 10 years.
You should think of all the rubber parts that way. That means fuel, brake and coolant hoses, they will usually give you some warning. Belts also age out.

Another often missed things are is coolant and brake fluid. Coolant does not stop cooling, but loses its capability to prevent corrosion. Brake fluid is a real snare. It collects water and that depresses the boiling point, but worse than that is that it can collect enough water to become corrosive. The brake fluid will become less of an issue when you replace the rubber brake lines that probably have visible cracks as you will have to refill the then empty system.

You coach is is also old enough the that the fuel system may not be alcohol proof. So, if fuel lines don't look good, just replace them all with SAE J30 R09 line.

Can a 20 yo coach be dependable? I wouldn't know, when we got this one it was already past that and it kinda is.... We just finished a 4400 mile excursion, and not I have to fix a drawer slide.

Matt
__________________
A lifelong waterman and his bride going dry places for as long as the fuel money lasts.
MattC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2014, 07:41 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Snowbird - Waterford Mi and Citrus Springs Fl.
Posts: 3,609
I carry fuses, belts and filters, a digital VOM, some common hand tools, and road insurance.

But, I am constantly keeping a wary ear and eye on everything. Maintenance (scheduled and non) is dealt with/kept up on a rotating basis (I don't want to spend a week at a time pulling maintenance, so I break it up).
__________________
1997 37' HR Endeavor, 275hp Cat, Freightliner
03 CR-V Blue Ox, Ready Brake
ahicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2014, 10:59 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Wbonsell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Poulsbo, WA
Posts: 429
I had Les Schwab look at the brake lines and they said they were fine. The MH was completely refurbished after an estate settlement and I feel lucky to have found it. I don't think the stove, refer or shower were ever used. The engine compartment looks new and there are no leaks anywhere. All the hoses and belts seem fine but I do carry spares. I'm thinking of changing out the brake fluid as I know moisture builds up and it is something I believe in changing every year or so.

The radiator fluid is fresh and temps are within normal range. I do worry about the water pump as it would appear to be a major pain to change out. May purchase a spare and have on hand just in case. I have been exercising the generator weekly as it only had 18 hours on it, but it appears to run fine will be looking more closely at the fuel line.

Have started a Zep project to bring some shine back to the siding. Have done the front and rear and it really looks good so far. My grandson sort of fell into the screen door a month or two ago and tweaked the hinge a bit so the lower corner is dragging a bit on the door sill. Not sure if there is an easy fix. You just have to lift the screen door a tad to open and close. Other than that, all is well.

Anxious to hit the road and start our fantastic voyage. After this 6 month trip we will evaluate both the MH and the toad to see if they will work for more extended trips. Would love for this 6 month trip to become a 6 year journey.
Bill
__________________
Bill and Debb---2010 CT Coachworks Siena 35V
1999 Jeep Cherokee Sport---Roadmaster Falcon 5250 -
1 Cavalon (Scooby)
Wbonsell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2014, 11:31 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 167
With a coach this old, here are the things I would keep on-hand, so if something went wrong. Belts, Radiator/Heater Hoses, 2gal of coolant with 2gal of fresh water, new Thermostat/gasket, spare Spark Plugs/Plug Wires. Your coach will also have a Distributor Cap. Even if you don't replace/repair anything on trip, when you do a full tune up in Spring time, you'll already have all the components.

All rubber components deteriorate with age/heat so I would also replace all vacuum lines and Power Brake Booster Hose when you do the Rad/Heater hoses.

Many things a lot of people don't do, is replace the Rear Differential(rear end)fluid. It will get milky from condensation over time from just sitting and short trips that won't let the rear end to heat up enough to burn off any condensation.
__________________

__________________
JaycoEagle10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
repair, replace, replacement



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fogged Window repair thread. akeyzoo Class A Motorhome Discussions 157 03-28-2016 10:07 AM
Anthem rear end replacement. (long) brobox Entegra Owner's Forum 27 08-18-2014 06:12 PM
Basement door repair or replacement 2001 Seaview sresener National RV Owner's Forum 10 06-26-2014 11:44 PM
Firestone Air Bag Replacement on 2001 Monaco Dynasty Yukon Jack Class A Motorhome Discussions 15 06-17-2014 07:41 PM
Warranty replacement for Shurflo 5.7 Smart Sensor pump wagonmaster2 Class A Motorhome Discussions 0 03-29-2014 11:16 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.