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Old 10-04-2016, 03:15 PM   #407
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I really like your Bockmann jig, great thinking.
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Old 10-05-2016, 08:46 AM   #408
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Eric, I went to the museum of natural history in Tokyo today, and saw this old belt driven lathe and thought of you! Here are the pic's!
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Old 10-06-2016, 04:48 AM   #409
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Eric, I went to the museum of natural history in Tokyo today, and saw this old belt driven lathe and thought of you! Here are the pic's!
That's awesome - Thank You!
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Old 10-06-2016, 05:15 PM   #410
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Here's some photos of when I fixed the wall after the window leaked. I removed the window and the front furniture to do the repair.

The wall is constructed of lauan plywood sandwiched with XPS foam inbetween them. On the outside is fiberglass. The foam XPS is supported by the aluminum framing.


When I removed the inside of the wall and the insulation, there is unprotected steel inside the wall that had rusted. From taking apart the roof and floor, it seems that all of these steel sheets had rusted, but this one was particularly bad.


The screws holding the outside trim in place had rusted and somebody had put plugs in to try to hold them. There isn't anything on the inside for the plugs to grab on to - the XPS isn't strong enough.


I added an angle aluminum piece to make an attachment point for the trim


The walls of the Elandan are curved, and the XPS is pressed formed as a curve. I found that I couldn't reproduce the shape of the foam, so I made wooden ribs to help shape the wall. I also added fiberglass to strengthen the place where the sheet metal had rusted into the lauan.


I then glued the ribs into place and held them in place with telescoping supports. I did not replace the sheet metal support.


Followed by gluing new XPS foam in place between the ribs.


The outside was also supported while gluing the wall together


The end result of the outside wall was much better, but not perfect.


The whole job was done during a week off from work, and was back in use as a weekday apartment the following week.
Eric, Thank you for the wall pics. Was this part of another thread I can visit? And were the pinks walls the inside of the outer fiberglass walls? On mine they have delaminated and deformed into some weird shapes that I kind of doubt I will be able to force back to straight.
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Old 10-07-2016, 01:00 AM   #411
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Eric, Thank you for the wall pics. Was this part of another thread I can visit? And were the pinks walls the inside of the outer fiberglass walls? On mine they have delaminated and deformed into some weird shapes that I kind of doubt I will be able to force back to straight.
No, this is not from another thread. Just pictures I had lying around. The pink part was the original glue that held the foam. It's the back of the outside walls with the plywood still there. Mine was also buckled and deformed before I did it, but it came out fairly straight. Not perfect, but fairly straight. The plywood backing on the fiberglass is what lets go and gets all warped. When you remove that the shape returns. Then you can force it back into a decent shape. I didn't take any before pictures unfortunately. It was a number of years ago, so I don't remember all the details, but it wasn't that hard to do.
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Old 10-11-2016, 10:05 PM   #412
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Hey Erik, I've been following along and also catching up after being away from the forum at times. You've done a super job on the lathe, they sure built things to last back then. Now restored clean with tolerances etc back to spec it'll run for 100 more years.

The Elandan progress I eagerly await. Looks like you have it laid out well. It'll be slow at times but it'll come along great, better than new! I have a 35ft '99 Adventurer project I have started I'll tease you with I'll reveal more when the project is in full swing, and then share the whole process in a thread. I will say this; it will NOT be used as a typical motorhome to be lived in. Oh OK I'll give a hint.....it has to do with music

You will indeed love the powder coating. I also give a great big nod of gratitude to Glenn for all the very educating info on the process! A few years ago I was introduced to powder coating when I did a bit of refurbishing of my Allis-Chalmers 200 tractor. I had the front rims, hubs and bolts, instrument shroud-(front of windshield), air cleaner, and front end weights done, as well as cab interior metal parts. It turned out great, I agree with Glenn, it's hard to beat in most applications. I have attached a pic for you, (click 3 times to enlarge full size, you can see the front rims best). The tractor is a turbo diesel from 1974, my dad purchased it new. The orange paint and decals is all original. It was then sold in 1986 and cared for well, and I bought it back in 1997.

Keep up the great work Erik!
Best regards,
W.D.
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Old 10-11-2016, 10:47 PM   #413
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WD, that looks like the tractor that the guy farmed the 80 around our old farm in IL. He is still using it, as far as I know?
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Old 10-12-2016, 12:23 AM   #414
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Hey "Rail", yeah a good machine, and a significant powerhouse in it's day. Times have surely changed. AC once was an innovative and massive company who built the first steam powered engines for the New York subway system. In addition, they built the turbine engines for the Hoover Dam, and all hydro engines for the TVA. The list goes on and on. The farm imp line was purchased by Deutz of Germany in '85, then absorbed into what is known as AGCO around '92 I believe. Lot's more to the story of the "Persian orange", but that's enough off topic info for now

Incidentally, Thailand is sure a heck of a long way from Illinois. Looks beautiful from the pics you've posted.

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Old 10-12-2016, 11:34 PM   #415
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WD, I sent you a PM! Don't want to steal Eric's thread! Rail!
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Old 10-15-2016, 08:42 AM   #416
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Hey Erik, I've been following along and also catching up after being away from the forum at times. You've done a super job on the lathe, they sure built things to last back then. Now restored clean with tolerances etc back to spec it'll run for 100 more years.
I hope so. With the amount of work I put in to it, I kind of feel like it's a museum piece when I go out in the shop. I look forward to working with it though. Friends who come and visit are both taken aback by the way it is turning out, and when I tell them how many hours I've put into an old machine. It seems Americans appreciate old industrial machinery more than Swedes for some reason.

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The Elandan progress I eagerly await. Looks like you have it laid out well. It'll be slow at times but it'll come along great, better than new! I have a 35ft '99 Adventurer project I have started I'll tease you with I'll reveal more when the project is in full swing, and then share the whole process in a thread. I will say this; it will NOT be used as a typical motorhome to be lived in. Oh OK I'll give a hint.....it has to do with music
Looking forward to reading about it. Sounds like fun! I'm guessing a horizontal barn door setup which opens up to a stage?

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Originally Posted by Electra 225 View Post
You will indeed love the powder coating. I also give a great big nod of gratitude to Glenn for all the very educating info on the process! A few years ago I was introduced to powder coating when I did a bit of refurbishing of my Allis-Chalmers 200 tractor. I had the front rims, hubs and bolts, instrument shroud-(front of windshield), air cleaner, and front end weights done, as well as cab interior metal parts. It turned out great, I agree with Glenn, it's hard to beat in most applications. I have attached a pic for you, (click 3 times to enlarge full size, you can see the front rims best). The tractor is a turbo diesel from 1974, my dad purchased it new. The orange paint and decals is all original. It was then sold in 1986 and cared for well, and I bought it back in 1997.

Keep up the great work Erik!
Best regards,
W.D.
What an awesome tractor, W.D.! That turned out really nice.
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Old 10-15-2016, 09:15 AM   #417
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Time for an update - It's been about a week since I was on the forum. I had some fabrication work come in which took all of my free time. I do fabrication work from time to time on the side, and that helps pay for all my "toys." I rebuilt a dog powered trike (think Iditarod) which I am kicking myself for forgetting to take pictures of. I also built a simple stand for a kitchen fireplace.


Those projects completed, I can get back to my own. I got in a delivery of metal yesterday, so now I can complete my oven. In the meanwhile I have been chugging along on the lathe motor and threading gearbox.

The internals of the motor had probably 80 years of grime and metal shavings inside it.


Once I started to clean it, I could see spots where the metal shards had nicked the shellack on the copper. Kind of hard to see in the picture, but I'll be carefully touching them up so that there is no risk for a short circuit.


Cleaning the inside took a lot of elbow grease, but finally the copper started to gleam.


Apparently the rear bearing was much easier to repack than the front. The front was so stuck that I had to take the motor down to the local tractor supply shop to get it pulled off!


With my new-to-me free oven I could now weld some of the cast iron cracks. I started with the big drive belt cover that had cracked between two air holes. It wouldn't fit in the oven, so I placed it with shims on top of two of the burners to slowly heat it.


After several hours on simmer, the cast iron piece can be MIG welded with stainless steel wire. You monitor the heating of the piece for several hours with an infra red heater making sure that it heats up evenly. Then a few seconds of welding, and then you let it cool again over several hours.


After a total of about 6 or 7 hours (I was working when not checking on it ), A few passes with the grinder and the weld is hardly noticeable. There are some minor valleys where the welds come up against the mount, but it will most likely get hidden by paint and this is not a structural piece.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:28 AM   #418
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When I took the threading gearbox off the lathe I noticed shiny brass cuttings on the gears which were otherwise covered in grime. So either it's eating a brass bushing or somebody turned brass recently with it. I haven't used the gearbox more than to make sure it wasn't seized, so I can't say which without a rebuild.


It appears that whoever last used the lathe didn't know that the side mounted threading gearbox had a separate oil supply. Looking inside it I could understand why the levers where hard to move. The grime was everywhere and nothing was well lubricated. The top gear is supposed to easily slide on the axle, but it moved only under force. The lever to move the gear is broken off, and I suspect that there is a connection between the two.


It took me over an hour to pound the main shaft out with a dead-blow hammer. The splines on the end are slightly twisted, but that was not the main problem. It was just grimed in place.


After I finally got the case emptied of all the gears and shafts, it didn't look all that bad. Just a cleanup and new paint is needed. Here you can see the drip-line lubrication for all of the bearings. All of the copper lines go up to a small reservoir. In the reservoir there is cotton thread tied to twisted wire which is then put into each of the copper pipes. The cotton wicks up the oil from the reservoir and drips it into the lines and the bearings. Cool!


Still in a pile, the state of the internals tell the tale. You can see that the lubrication feed tracks on the brass bushing are completely clogged, and the rest of the parts also need a thorough cleaning. Time to fix my parts washer...


Fortunately I could not find anywhere that the brass shavings would have come from. Still hoping they are from an outside source.
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Old 10-15-2016, 08:34 PM   #419
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So, no oil pump?

Thought of adding one?

(We are currently in Bowling Green KY at our last race of the season, should return next week, hope to pick up the powder coat primer then)

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Old 10-16-2016, 02:32 AM   #420
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So, no oil pump?

Thought of adding one?
Not until you mentioned it.

I think it would be difficult to add an oil pump. There is no sump for the threading gearbox to recirculate the oil. It just drips onto the coolant catch pan.

As far as I can tell, most lathes of that era used this type of oiling and it seems to have worked. There are a number of small caps that get filled with oil each time you use the lathe. As I'm remounting all those parts, I'm painting all of the oiling nipples, balls and caps red so I can find them all.

Interesting side note: The gearbox internals were made by Norton Industries in England.

Good luck in Bowling Green!
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