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Old 05-15-2016, 10:18 AM   #43
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As for lifting the frame - check out the airstream forums for frame off restorations - they seem to lift it from above at multiple points. When you set the frame down, build a temporary subframe - bolt or screw the aluminum structure to a wooden subframe to ensure it holds its shape in the days/weeks.months while you rebuild the floor and subframe.

You probably know this already, but DO NOT use treated plywood for your new subfloor (or anywhere else for that matter). Treated plywood has chemicals in it that create a catalytic reaction with any aluminum, causing the aluminum to corrode: this is the reason why aluminum boats are not built with treated plywood floors.
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Old 05-15-2016, 11:20 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keen Family View Post
As for lifting the frame - check out the airstream forums for frame off restorations - they seem to lift it from above at multiple points. When you set the frame down, build a temporary subframe - bolt or screw the aluminum structure to a wooden subframe to ensure it holds its shape in the days/weeks.months while you rebuild the floor and subframe.

You probably know this already, but DO NOT use treated plywood for your new subfloor (or anywhere else for that matter). Treated plywood has chemicals in it that create a catalytic reaction with any aluminum, causing the aluminum to corrode: this is the reason why aluminum boats are not built with treated plywood floors.
I would have made this mistake (treated Plywood).

I would at less coat the plywood with polyurethane?
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Old 05-15-2016, 01:43 PM   #45
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I would have made this mistake (treated Plywood).

I would at less coat the plywood with polyurethane?
My experience doing just that has been that it's better at sealing moisture in than protecting it.

Marine ply is expensive, but on a project that you expect to be around for a while when finished, worth it in my book.
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Old 05-16-2016, 03:04 AM   #46
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As for lifting the frame - check out the airstream forums for frame off restorations - they seem to lift it from above at multiple points. When you set the frame down, build a temporary subframe - bolt or screw the aluminum structure to a wooden subframe to ensure it holds its shape in the days/weeks.months while you rebuild the floor and subframe.
Thanks for the tip on checking out the Aistream forums! Lots of good information there. I hadn't seen all the trailer frame-off renovations they do. The gantry frames for lifting the body is not a bad idea at all. I'll have to look at the structure of the Elandan's roof and body to see if it's possible.

One big difference with the Airstreams is that the Elandan's floor comes off with the rest of the body and forms a complete shell. This means that I will not have to worry about the body keeping it's shape while off the frame in the same way that the Airstreamers do. It also means that the body will weigh quite a bit more.

I saw some great homemade tools for moving the bodies around and lifting them. Definitely worth considering!
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Old 05-16-2016, 03:07 AM   #47
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My experience doing just that has been that it's better at sealing moisture in than protecting it.

Marine ply is expensive, but on a project that you expect to be around for a while when finished, worth it in my book.
I plan on using marine plywood in the build. It's not that much more expensive and certainly provides a peace of mind! Plus, as you say, one does plan to keep a project like this around for a while once it's completed.
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Old 05-16-2016, 07:24 AM   #48
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As tempted as you might be to use your hobby to control the electrical systems on your Motor Home, I would remind you of the KISS theory.

When driven the systems are subjected to every stress (heat, cold, humidity, water, shaking) you can imagine.

My suggestion is use you current harness as a guide to how many wires, and gauges you will need go to a store and buy as many rolls of different colored wire you can and make your own new harness.

You can add stripping to the wire by unrolling the wire and streaking between to posts and using these pens. Letting the paint dry and rolling the wire back up.

Wiring is not that hard if you take your time and complete one circuit at a time.
This is a good way of doing it Glenn, and I have done it that way when I've restored boats and cars in the past. I do like to use the KISS principle, but like beauty, simple is in the eye of the beholder.

When I say that I have microcontrollers as a a hobby, there is a little more to it than that. I work with developing safety critical technologies for use in aircraft and automotive systems. I have also designed and built several communications systems used for machine to machine global communications and IOT. But I do not work with microcontrollers and networking except for fun. Therefore it's a hobby.

When I look at a harness like that one, I think - it could be done so much simpler with just some microcontrollers and simple networking! J1939 is the communications standard for new heavy vehicles, so I figured I would extend it to suit my needs. I want to have a lot more control of systems than I had in the past, and I also want to have a central error messaging system. If the vehicle has a problem, heavy vehicle mechanics will be familiar with the J1939 system and should be able to help fault find it.

But you are absolutely correct in the stress that these types of systems are subjected to, and I think that is something many builders, including coach builders, forget. Heat, cold, humidity, water, and shaking are just some of the things that the system is exposed to. Add in corrosive substances like road salt, deformation and age fatiguing, ice expansion, and rocks being kicked up underneath the vehicle and you have a quite the headache of designing a system that will survive more than just a few years. I certainly plan to apply standard safety critical thought practice to the design of the electrical system.

BTW, I checked out your build thread. That is a nice coach and absolutely some nice work! I might steal some ideas on the interior.
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Old 05-16-2016, 08:58 AM   #49
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In terms of sealing plywood, boat manufacturers didn't, but those restoring boats usually do. If you do seal it, seal it on all sides, otherwise moisture will get in and won't be able to get out. The best options are epoxy or spar varnish. In an application like yours, the wood shouldn't be getting that wet, so the varnish isn't essential. MH manufacturers don't seal their plywood.
Having said that, if this were my project I would seal it.

As for types of plywood, marine plywood is an option. It is a high quality ply, without voids. It's also expensive. Another option, if you can get it in Sweden, is Arauco ply. Both will be higher quality than what the manufacturer used. You could simply use plain old exterior (non treated ply). It will be plenty strong enough. Don't use interior plywood, as the glues used in interior ply are not waterproof.
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Old 05-16-2016, 10:12 AM   #50
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Hello Erik,
If your plan regarding the micro controllers system is a success, the RV industry should take a look at your example. You may have a design career ahead of you. I find your plan very interesting, and knowing people in aviation myself, I believe I get what you're talking about, (that which is replacing the traditional "fly by wire" system if I am correct). (?) If I am not, please do continue to educate!

I am following your project in earnest, good luck and be safe.

Regards,
W.D.
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:19 AM   #51
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W.D., you are indeed correct.
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Old 05-17-2016, 08:46 PM   #52
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I also have an 89 elandan 37'. just want to tag this thread to get some ideas. I dont think i will be going as far as what you are but just want to stay in the loop.
Thanks.
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Old 05-18-2016, 03:06 PM   #53
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I also have an 89 elandan 37'. just want to tag this thread to get some ideas. I dont think i will be going as far as what you are but just want to stay in the loop.
Thanks.
If you need any detail photos for reference, let me know and I'll take them as I disassemble.
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Old 05-18-2016, 04:03 PM   #54
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It's been raining for a few days, so no work on the Elandan until this evening.

The entry step is now out.


The bottom of the steps shows several bad repairs in the past
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Old 05-18-2016, 04:15 PM   #55
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I remember reading about back in the '80s when Aston Martin presented the new Lagonda. One of the first of the new series Lagondas was to be shown it caught fire while being driven out of the factory, or something along those lines. What really struck in my mind was the conclusion of the tech team as to the cause of the fire. "Someone hooked a red wire to a black wire"

I was reminded of that when I found this in my wiring harness:
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Old 05-19-2016, 03:31 PM   #56
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Today I finished stripping the interior of the Elandan. The body is now ready to be lifted off the frame.

It's now just an empty shell


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