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Old 07-27-2013, 09:57 PM   #1
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Head removal problems

hi everyone!

I hope someone can help me with this. My '72 Indian needs an intake gasket replacement (Dodge P/N 2120063), but the original has a water jacket port almost completely blocked off (see photos). The available replacements from NAPA, O'Reilly's and Carquest have this port completely open. The valley pan/intake gasket set is factory original (89,000 miles).

NAPA AUTO PARTS

What is the reason for this port being blocked off, and would it create problems to have it completely open? I cannot find an exact duplicate of the original.

Additionally, the exhaust manifold has a broken bolt, so I was working on removing the left (driver's) side head to drill out the bolt and replace the exhaust gasket. However, there is a bolt dead-center in the lower part of the manifold, and it will NOT budge. I have hit this thing with a 1/2" battery-op impact gun cranked open (~250 lb/ft torque), as well as a 1/2" air gun, and a breaker bar with hammer. The head is still on the engine, as this manifold hides 4 head bolts.

I hesitate on using an open flame to heat it with wiring nearby (1.5"), as well as a leaking brake line in this area (going to fix this once head is off also).

HELP!!
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Old 07-28-2013, 12:34 AM   #2
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Blocked ports sometimes were to increase temperature for smog.

Leave out maybe.

Could check with an engine rebuilder on that one.

For frozen bolt impact is best option, lesser prezsure but leave it there it may get it loose.
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Old 07-28-2013, 10:01 AM   #3
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For removing the broken bolt have a welding shop stick weld the bolt while it's in the head. A good welder will know that the welding rod will not stick to the cast iron head , only the steel bolt. I found this out when I had to remove a broken bolt from a ford 460 . My brother is a welder and when he started welding I started hollering at him to stop . He told me it would work just fine and he welded it so it had a piece sticking out and between the heat of the welding and the piece sticking out he put a pipe wrench on it and it came wright out.
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Old 07-28-2013, 10:12 AM   #4
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That port in the dead center of the intake manifold looks like the heat riser. It brings exhaust gas to the area beneath the carburetor to improve fuel atomization during cold starts and warmup. Blocking the heat risers was an old racer's trick as it kept the intake manifold and intake charge cooler for maximum performance. It looks like Dodge did that on the original manifold gaskets, perhaps to minimize vapor lock and other hot running problems in the truck/RV applications.

Again, an old racer's trick is to use a very thin flat piece of sheet metal between the intake manifold gasket and the head to block off this port - a piece of metal from a soft drink can worked very well. Just surround the area with a good gasket sealer like Permatex #2 non-hardening and the metal shim will seal off just fine. If you want, you could drill a small hole in the shim to duplicate the OEM configuration.

Rusty
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Old 07-28-2013, 10:58 AM   #5
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You want P/N MS96001 (NAPA AUTO PARTS) instead of MS96000

You have to go to the Federal Mogul site to look up this part under MD/HD Truck Online Catalog (Commercial area).

The reason these bolts get stuck is that they go through into the water jackets and the end of the bolt gets rusted. When you put all this back together ensure you use anti-sieze compound on all manifold bolts.

Dave
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Old 07-28-2013, 09:16 PM   #6
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Thanks for all the replies! Good info in all!

Now I know why Dodge did it, and Dave helped with a P/N that I can use for NAPA. Thanks!!

Unfortunately, the center bold did not come out, and the bolt corners rounded off, so I'm drilling the bolt head off. 2 bolts came out (4 didn't), but the ones that broke still have 90% of their length, so I'll look into a welder once the head is on my workbench.

The wrench-fest continues . . .

Steve
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Old 07-28-2013, 10:01 PM   #7
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Please note that the 413 uses a skirted thermostat. Only source is Mr. Gasket #4367.

Dave
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Old 08-09-2013, 08:08 AM   #8
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Sound,

Dave has been completely accurate in his remarks.

I was the aftermarket engineer for McCord gasket before they were sold out to Federal Mogul. That port that is block is the heat riser for the intake. It is block to keep the manifold from getting too hot. There are two water ports at the rear of the intake that are restricted, but those are closed off to allow degassing of the coolant and the are not part of the coolant circulation.

We had a product that was much better, if it still in production, it was two composite manifold gaskets and a tin manifold shield (turkey pan) as a separate part. I don't have catalogs anymore, so I can't help you with a part number.

As to the stuck fasteners....
Heat with a torch, and cool with AFT. Get out and let the smoke clear. Repeat.
Aft will be drawn into the area, but it does not coke up as an engine oil would do.

A side note - A test done for a metal working magazine found that the best penetrating lubricant you could buy was...
A 50/50 mix of Acetone and ATF
Sorry, all the canned stuff lost.

Matt
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Old 08-10-2013, 05:03 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattC View Post
Heat with a torch, and cool with AFT. Get out and let the smoke clear. Repeat.

A side note - A test done for a metal working magazine found that the best penetrating lubricant you could buy was...
A 50/50 mix of Acetone and ATF
Sorry, all the canned stuff lost.
Hello Matt.

Yeah, I read the article about the canned stuff, and I'd agree with its author. Canned stuff is convenient, but not the best. We ended up using a torch on the broken manifold bolt, and cooling it with a spray of CO2, which worked nicely. Got the bolt out. (I work for a beverage distributor.)

The other 4 came out fine with a stud remover.

Dave helped tremendously, as I was also able to get the part numbers for the exhaust and head gaskets from the same location he did.

My factory part number book and service manual arrived the day AFTER we finished with this repair.

Steven
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Old 08-11-2013, 02:17 PM   #10
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If you have spring thermostat for choke mounted on intake, ports need to be opened even if a little to heat spring and open choke, some springs were adjustable for different climates, Really fuel robber if choke does not open fully so enough!
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