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Old 07-10-2010, 06:41 PM   #1
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Question Hot Plug-in and Converter

I've got a Seventy-nine Midas Class C on a Chevy Van Chassis. I just acquired it last month and am still very new to RV'ing. Today I plugged in the power for the first time, using a converter to hook it to household electrical current. I left it plugged in for about twenty to thirty minutes max, to run the a/c [which I was delighted to find out works quite well] and cool things off inside. A couple of the interior lights work too, I'm happy to say. After that time I went to unplug it and found that both the RV's plug and the converter were both very hot. The prongs on the RV plug are kind of dark, so I'm going to see if I can find some steel wool to brighten them up and see if that will correct the problem. However in the mean time I just wanted to ask if it's normal for the plug to get so hot? And is it really safe to be plugging it into household current?
Thanks in advance for any advise.
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Old 07-10-2010, 08:38 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NtheWind View Post
The prongs on the RV plug are kind of dark, so I'm going to see if I can find some steel wool to brighten them up and see if that will correct the problem. However in the mean time I just wanted to ask if it's normal for the plug to get so hot? And is it really safe to be plugging it into household current?
NtheWind, Dark colored blades will not make a good contact with the jaws in the receptacle and the cord cap will have a tendency to overheat. If you are attempting to power a 30A RV plug, you can get that type of power from 1 phase of your household power.

By all means get a fine flat file and shine up those prongs. At some point consider cutting off that old cap and tapping in a new temperature stable plastic cap that will hold the blades firmly insted of the OE rubber one. This will help with the overheating plug.
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Old 07-10-2010, 09:01 PM   #3
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IF the plug is uncomfortable to hold.. IT IS TOO HOT
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:24 PM   #4
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A household plug is usually 15 amps, max 20 amps service. You adapted it to power a 30 amp circuit and turned on the air which proably draws at least 20 amps depending on size.
I put a 30 amp RV service in my garage so I can run the air when I need too. If I don't run the air I can hook up the same way you did.
I had a 2005 Kodiak trailer prior to my Winnie and it took 27 amps to start the a/c, went down to about 20amps after start-up if I remember correctly.
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Old 07-18-2010, 11:08 AM   #5
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Thanks leadman,
That would explain why the a/c seemed like it kept powering down.
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Old 07-18-2010, 05:20 PM   #6
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You're welcome. If you have a meter you can check the draw yourself or if a friend has one. The meter will have to have a ampere clamp and the meter has to be capable of checking 120 volts ac. Harbor Freight has this meter available. Checking the draw would let you know if the a/c unit was drawing power within the specifications.
Unless you put in a 30a service it would be good to not try to run the a/c. Low power can cause your a/c unit to be damaged. Your wall outlet should run most everything else at the same time except for maybe a microwave as they too draw alot of power. There is usually a tag inside the micro that tells you the draw.
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