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Old 08-05-2007, 02:15 PM   #15
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Lorna,
I am going to try a small torch to heat the 6" scraper to see if it will help losen the blueboard glue tomorrow.I'll let you know how that works out.It's kind of like the chicken or the egg question.With me having to heat the scraper,I guess I got to strip the blue baord first before I seal the roof like I wanted to.
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Old 08-05-2007, 05:11 PM   #16
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Be careful with that torch. We don't want you toasting yourself or your RV!
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Old 08-05-2007, 06:55 PM   #17
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Fleamarketer, That would be a very bad idea as foam heated gives off toxic fumes that can and if given the right conditions, kill you and anyone else in that rv!!! Time to rethink this over for sure!!! Take that from a old coast guard/Fireman who doesn't want to read about this in the morning news!!
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Old 08-06-2007, 12:06 AM   #18
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Thank You Lorna/Capt Dan for chiming in.

Both of you have good thoughts about this job and are likely right.

I'll get another scraper and use two at the same time(one on one side of the area I am scraping and the other on the other side to see if it will go faster without any heat.)I will get a good knife to cut sections too.Just want to be very careful not to cut the skin.

Don't think I want to do just sections that appear damaged.The costs of the blueboard is so
cheap and I am here doing this now,makes more sense to renew all of it.Just seems like a big job right now.

Once I have it all off,what do you suggest I use to clean off all the old remaining glue that won't effect the new glue?.

Thank you for helping me so far,

Gary.
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Old 08-06-2007, 06:06 PM   #19
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It will take gallons of lacquer thinner to clean off the old glue. How high do you want to get? The hotter it is the less you want to mess with lacquer thinner as the thinner evaporates faster and the fumes get more potent (please don't ask me how I know ). The old contact cement won't affect the adhesion of the new contact cement. What will mess it up is dirt. Clean the dirty sufaces down with TSP (you can find at Lowe's, Home Depot, anywhere that sells paint... usually in the cleaner section and/or the paint section). Surfaces must be dry.

My qualifications regarding working with contact cement.... I used to build custom laminate countertops with my Husband. We have "refaced" more kitchen cabinets than I care to think about (I hate refacing). We have built custom laminate cabinet. David has managed 2 custom cabinet shops (first one while he was still in high school) and has built bank teller systems for Debolt and cabinets for park model trailers. He has about 40 years experience in construction. I started working with him (installing cabinets) a few months before we got married (we've been married 27 years). I also can set ceramic tile (My Dad was a tile setter for 50 years). So I'm not a total idiot when it comes to some things regarding construction.
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Old 08-06-2007, 07:16 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lorna:
It will take gallons of lacquer thinner to clean off the old glue. How high do you want to get? The hotter it is the less you want to mess with lacquer thinner as the thinner evaporates faster and the fumes get more potent (please don't ask me how I know ). The old contact cement won't affect the adhesion of the new contact cement. What will mess it up is dirt. Clean the dirty sufaces down with TSP (you can find at Lowe's, Home Depot, anywhere that sells paint... usually in the cleaner section and/or the paint section). Surfaces must be dry.

My qualifications regarding working with contact cement.... I used to build custom laminate countertops with my Husband. We have "refaced" more kitchen cabinets than I care to think about (I hate refacing). We have built custom laminate cabinet. David has managed 2 custom cabinet shops (first one while he was still in high school) and has built bank teller systems for Debolt and cabinets for park model trailers. He has about 40 years experience in construction. I started working with him (installing cabinets) a few months before we got married (we've been married 27 years). I also can set ceramic tile (My Dad was a tile setter for 50 years). So I'm not a total idiot when it comes to some things regarding construction.
Be careful with the flame retardant contact cements as they can have a bad effect on the kidneys, liver and brain. We went with them as part of a safety program at the mill that I was head of maintenance at. We later found out that they were not as safe as we were led to believe. We did not connect the personel problems and the new cement together until one of our men was hospitalised and the toxicology came back indicating he was experiencing brain and kidney problems from the trichlorethane(?) based solvents in the non-flammable cements.

The man who was generally quiet and easy going had become very argumentative and troublesome at work and after fighting with his wife one night, had gotten into a bar room brawl which is why he was in the hospital. His wife was the one who asked for tests to figure out why he had this sudden personality shift. After treatment along with eliminating future exposure to the cement he recovered from the personality problems and returned to his normal kindly self but the kidneys are probably going to be touble for the rest of his life.

Myself I got the migrane headaches, irritability and moderate liver symptoms and now have to be careful not to cause a flareup.

We changed over to Amonia/Latex based contact cements after that and just had to deal with providing warm dry airflow to prevent condensation and speed the drying. Also had to change over to low pressure spray equipment eliminating the glue pumps and drum agitators we had been using with the other glues as the high pressure systems caused the latex to start setting up in the pumps, tanks and hoses.

Whatever type bonding agent is used make sure to read the safety sheet first and if they can't provide the safety sheet priot to or at least at the time of sale don't buy it. Our plant manager didn't insist on getting the safety sheet first and a good number of us have now been paying for his mistake for over twenty years.

Lorna, my first apprenticeship was as a tile setter and doing formica cabinetts along with formica ceilings. Time passes too quickly, that was almost 40 years ago too.
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Old 08-07-2007, 04:35 AM   #21
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Dear Lorna/Neil:
There is no doubt in my mind about you experience and advise.Given the fact that I intent to fulltime in this Winnebago,I want to be completly safe when it is done.So Neil,I am confused about the glues.The fire hazard of the glues is on point I want to pay close attentsion to,but how the vapors effect you is something I didn't consider.Wondering what is used on the newer MH's when they are built?.Kind sounds like Neil the effects of these glues don't stop after they have dried.Like if you not careful,I could build a 4 wheel sick bed."Confused".
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Old 08-07-2007, 01:44 PM   #22
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Well-made more progess today.Got the ceiling in the bathroom for the most part down.Rained and I saw where the center seam in the bathroom is leaking.Tore down some of the side wall in the shower.(That is a wall that had dry rot and is between the shower and the back part of the bunk beds.)Holy cow,I found that wall to have 1 x 1 framing.You would think Winnebago could afford more then that,but at least it's something.Going to rebuild the shower in tile backer board.Going to take out the bunk beds and put in a dresser and a table in it's place.

But back to the ceiling,I got a 12" scraper to help my production in the removal of the blue board.Still it's slow going.

The materails cost from Sherwin-Williams store is looking towards $350 to $425.After rental of addtional equipment the total job is looking towards $500 to 570.

The one thing I didn't ask was what would a dealer charge to reseal a roof on a 20' winnebago?.Not for nothing-it helps motvate me more after I find that out.
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Old 08-07-2007, 07:07 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally posted by fleamarketer:
Dear Lorna/Neil:
There is no doubt in my mind about you experience and advise.Given the fact that I intent to fulltime in this Winnebago,I want to be completly safe when it is done.So Neil,I am confused about the glues.The fire hazard of the glues is on point I want to pay close attentsion to,but how the vapors effect you is something I didn't consider.Wondering what is used on the newer MH's when they are built?.Kind sounds like Neil the effects of these glues don't stop after they have dried.Like if you not careful,I could build a 4 wheel sick bed."Confused".
Once the solvent is flashed off the danger is passed. If you do not have a proper respirator and ventilation with the Non-Flam solvent the health effects from the one over exposure can be life long. You do need to take care not to build a toxic stew. Make sure your materials used below the roofs skin are for interior use in a residential application and you should be OK. Just be carefull of the health risks from the fumes etc woking in a confined space.
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Old 08-08-2007, 03:10 AM   #24
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Neil,
I will no doubt be very careful about which contact glue I use to put back the Blueboard and 1/4 plywood and what ever I glue to that.

The blueboard is comlpetely off the bathroom ceiling now.Fished that last night.Still got to work on getting the bunkbed out and the rest of the shower wall.

Still I wonder how much a dealer would charge to reseal the roof.In anycase,I guess I wouldn't get the Snow Roof Systems 10 garantee that I am getting by putting that materail on.

I looked at the roof and I can see where some donnut tried to seal the roof in what looks like a gray materail.If I look inside,yeppers,that is where the leaks are.Well,that is why we have the term "hack job" I guess.

HeHE-when I was growing up,my family never owned a new house.My Dad would buy old farm houses and remodel them while we lived in them.He used to tell me I am real good at taking things down,but he wasn't sure about me putting them back.In this case I hope he is looking down now while I prove him wrong.
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Old 08-08-2007, 05:35 PM   #25
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Don't forget to cut props to hold the glued up foam and plywood up while the glue completely sets up. We left ours up overnight.
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Old 08-08-2007, 06:56 PM   #26
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Lorna,
You read my mind.(must be speed reading thro-kind of a small mind-HeHe)

Gary
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Old 08-09-2007, 01:34 PM   #27
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We use brake cleaner for preping parts for racing engines. No problem in the summer, but exposed myself (not that way!) a little more than I should have one winter in the shop, and suffered with horid sinus irritation for weeks. The Dr. took one look and said chemical burn. Not a lot we can do at this point. Got over it, but it was a lesson learned for sure.
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Old 08-09-2007, 02:57 PM   #28
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Not to get too far off topic-but I am a 20yr vet in drag racing.I hear ya,I hear ya for sure.
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