Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > Vintage RV's
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-28-2015, 09:35 AM   #225
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDEBILL308 View Post
Use some plastic sheet under the pink board. when you are ready to glue get every thing position and tape a sheet over the top to the bottom sheet and use a vacuum pump to apply pressure. You can always use the roller on top. Go back and see if you can find the link I sent you on vacuum bagging.
Bill
Don't I need to use something to keep the plastic from collapsing and preventing air from flowing out through the vacuum port? I'll have to find that link.

-cheers
__________________

__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-28-2015, 07:51 PM   #226
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,298
What a mess...

I do not like this part of the project... not at all. I don't want to complain, but if I had my choice of rebuilding the engine again or repairing this mess and finishing the siding... I'd do the engine.

As you can see, I got the rear compartment torn apart. It's quite the sight to behold. They used what's called "top hat channel" to frame some of this (first picture). I'm not even sure where to find it locally. Maybe I can come up with something different that will work.

I was close to discouragement this afternoon... and probably ungratefulness too... and once again, I questioned my sanity in all this. I might need to walk away for a little while and make sure I know where my heart's at...

-cheers










__________________

__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 08:30 PM   #227
Senior Member
 
ronspradley's Avatar


 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 1,514
Interesting to see that the frame looks real good and all the stuff that HR added looks like crap. On my Gulfstream that I am getting ready for paint, replacing the filler for walls where the wheel well flares are. They used two pieces of 3/4" plywood inside walls and this area is not sealed at all. All they had to do was 2 by treated lumber and it would not have just fallen apart like the plywood. Go figure.

Just keep at it, one problem and one day at a time. You did an amazing job on the engine, this too will turn out OK.

ronspradley
__________________
1993 Gulfstream Sun Voyager DP 30'
200 HP Cummins B5.9, 4sp Allison AT542
Toad 1998 Honda CRV, 2006 Honda CRV
Life's too short to drink cheap beer.
ronspradley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 09:13 PM   #228
Senior Member
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: FORT WORTH, TEXAS
Posts: 1,398
You need to take measurements so that the finished dimensions match the original openings. You know this so just a reminder.
Bill
__________________
2003 Bounder 38N
5.9 Cummins 3000MH Allison Trans.
Towing a 2014 Honda CRV with a Blue Ox tow bar.
WILDEBILL308 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2015, 12:33 PM   #229
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,477
The bottom does not look so bad.

A sand blaster will fix the ugly in short order where there is decent steel that is just rusty.

Harbor freight has different options and the pressure tank model works well and just plain sand from the box store will cut rust just fine.

Where things need to be rebuilt locate a steel place like PDM Steel or like company in the phone book and take a sample to their sales guys with lots of photos aa they can be real creative with solutions.

If you sand blast have a spray gun filled with paint thinner ready to go and spray the clean steel with the thinner as it will leave a tiny oil film to slow any rusting.

Prime as soon as you finish any welding.

Also check to see if any scrap yards sell to public as we have only one left that does and many useful tings can be found like diamond plate aluminum that makes good filler plates etc.
__________________
Tony & Lori
1989 Country Coach Savannah SE
TQ60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2015, 06:28 AM   #230
Senior Member
 
Daveinet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Chicago Area
Posts: 360
Menard's sells sandblasting media. It is more abrasive than normal sand. Sandblasting makes quick work of rust. Tons faster than a wire wheel. Rust sometimes looks worse than it is. Rust expands 12 times thicker than the steel it originally was. Paint the metal with cold galvanizing compound. That will provide a sacrificial layer of zinc to prevent rust.
__________________
'83 Revcon Prince 31' FWD FMCA F298817
502 w/Howell/GM ECM/Edelbrock MPFI,Thorley's & Magnaflows, 4L85E 4 spd, KoniFSD
Daveinet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2015, 02:08 PM   #231
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveinet View Post
Menard's sells sandblasting media. It is more abrasive than normal sand. Sandblasting makes quick work of rust. Tons faster than a wire wheel. Rust sometimes looks worse than it is. Rust expands 12 times thicker than the steel it originally was. Paint the metal with cold galvanizing compound. That will provide a sacrificial layer of zinc to prevent rust.
Ya, it probably doesn't show up in the pictures, but the bottom of the 'hat channel' is rotted pretty much completely away. The angle in the back used to be 1/8" thick, but it's about .050 now. I figure I'll cut everything up about 4 or 6" from the bottom and just scab in some new framing. Then sandblast what I can and throw some paint on it.

I do have a little siphon feed sandblaster... though it needs a new gun because the ceramic insert is gone. It works pretty well, but my air compressor doesn't really keep up.

Still working 11 or 12 hours/day lately... that's good since I can maybe put back a little money for more siding materials... but it's also kinda bad since I'm usually too whooped when I get home to tackle this stuff.

-cheers
__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2015, 04:10 AM   #232
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,298
This is a slow slow process for me... me and rusty steel just don't get along. That said, apparently I'm insane enough to keep pushing through this as best I can to make the storage compartments functional and solid, even if it doesn't look the best from underneath.

I got most of the rot cut out last night (pic). There's still a piece of angle on the right hand side that needs to come out, but I wanted to leave it there for now as a reference while I replace what I've cut out so far. I think I may actually leave the angle in the back... it's pretty thin since I knocked all the rust off of it, but I think it's strong enough to serve it's purpose. As far as the hat channel... I think maybe I can weld a piece of square tubing up inside the "U" of the hat, let it extend down below the hat where I have it cut off, and then weld a flat plat across the front of the tubing to match the ears on the hat. Replacing the angle at the bottom should be fairly easy. Hopefully.

Wish I could just blink my eyes and the whole thing be done... but it's ok... just keep moving forward... at whatever pace I can must up.

-cheers

__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2015, 08:49 PM   #233
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,298
A few pics of the storage compartment:

I made some pretty good progress on this project today, despite the lack of enthusiasm I have been feeling because of all the rust and rot in the storage compartment framing behind the rear wheels. I wasn't exactly sure how to tackle this, so I took a piece of the "hat channel" with me to Tractor Supply to see if I could come up with a way to extend it using readily available steel. I picked up about $75 worth of angle iron, flat stock, and a few cutoff wheels for my 4" angle grinder and headed back home.

As you can see from the pics below, I now have the storage compartment rebuilt. My welding and fabrication skills are pretty amateurish, but everything seems solid. The piece of angle you see inside the hat channel runs all the way down to the bottom of the flat plate that I used as an extension to replace the rot that was cut off. I was able to get pretty good penetration on the thicker angle without burning holes in the thin "hat channel."

I ended up keeping the old rusty angle located at the back and bottom of the compartment... after getting all the scale knocked off of it, it seemed like it was still sturdy enough to do it's job, and since a new piece of angle long enough to replace it was $25, I figured I'd save a few bucks.

The original angle on the front was 2.5" tall... and of course neither TSN or Home Depot had any angle iron that size, so I improvised by using a 2" angle and welding a 1" wide piece of flat stock inside the angle so it sticks up 1/2". I even managed to get the little corner radius pieces made and welded in today.

The paint that I sprayed on to help cover up the welds may or may not hold up... but I'm not too concerned about it. Before I put the interior panels back in the compartment, I'm going to spray everything down with some Blaster "Corrosion Stop." This stuff is amazing... it goes on kind of like a real thin spray grease, and then tacks up to the point you can't hardly wash it off. I use it inside the doors and on the hinges of my wrangler during winter, and it really seems to keep the rust at bay.

As far as the interior panels... the old ones were trash when I took them out. I believe they were made from the the same laminate that the exterior walls are made from... Luan and aluminum... and then they added 1/4" foam and some black plastic over the top for looks. I'll end up with 16" of exterior wall panel (32' long) that I'll need to cut off of the top panel after it's built, so I'll just use that for the storage compartment. The original stuff lasted 20 years, maybe these will too.

So I suppose that's all for now. I guess the next step is to remove the rest of the storage compartment doors and prep the framing to reinstall them, hopefully for the last time. I don't think I'll have any more framing to repair on this side, but I'll inspect everything to be sure. One of my storage compartment doors got kind of messed up last summer when I was trying to do body work on the original panels... it's got some overspray on it from some test patches I painted. I'd like to not have to paint all the storage doors, as they are still in decent shape, but if the door with overspray doesn't clean up, I might be painting them all anyways. We'll see.

Till next time...

-cheers













__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 03:07 PM   #234
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,298
Good news... the over spray on the storage compartment doors is coming off, mostly due to the fact that I did the old Zep High Traffic Floor Finish on the RV a few years ago, and the overspray is only adhered to the Zep. It doesn't come off easily, but it does come off.

I'm really hoping to get this side of the RV covered before winter... not sure if it will happen or not.

-cheers
__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 05:01 PM   #235
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,298
Oh, and by the way... whoever told me to use loctite s4 polyurethane caulk to seal the seam at the top of the storage compartments because "you'll do it once and never have to do it again..." you were probably right. I'm trying to remove the s4 caulk from the hinges on the doors and I'm having a neck of a time. I've never tried to remove such a tough caulk before. This stuff truly is awesome. I ended up having to taking a MAP gas torch to the stuff in order to soften enough that it comes off.

I guess I'm going to go ahead and try to paint the hinges before I put them back on. They're pretty scuffed up and missing quite a bit of paint. I should be able to get a paint match at the auto parts store without too much trouble, but getting them cleaned up is going to be a challenge... I don't have access to a sand blaster cabinet big enough to fit them inside of, so I guess I'll have to do it in the driveway with my little portable unit. Probably gonna take a lot of sand... and patience.

Cheers
__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 08:45 PM   #236
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Snowbird - Waterford Mi and Citrus Springs Fl.
Posts: 3,600
Used to be there were small shops that specialized in sand blasting very reasonably.
__________________
1997 37' HR Endeavor, 275hp Cat, Freightliner
03 CR-V Blue Ox, Ready Brake
ahicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 06:53 AM   #237
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,477
You could do electrolytic rust removal.

Put rusty part in water and add a bit of lye then connect battery charger negative to part on positive to a chunk of scrap and let it go overnight.
__________________
Tony & Lori
1989 Country Coach Savannah SE
TQ60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 06:58 AM   #238
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by TQ60 View Post
You could do electrolytic rust removal.

Put rusty part in water and add a bit of lye then connect battery charger negative to part on positive to a chunk of scrap and let it go overnight.
Does that work with aluminum? The hinges are aluminum.

-cheers
__________________

__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.