Go Back   iRV2 Forums > iRV2.com COMMUNITY FORUMS > Vintage RV's
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-20-2014, 06:26 AM   #99
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahicks View Post
Aluminum comes with varying degrees of "stiffness". The stuff used without backing is thicker, but what makes it able to be used without backing is the fact it's WAY stiffer! Unless you can find an economical source for it, I think it's going to be some pretty expensive stuff.....

You might check around an airport?
If we end up restoring this RV... I believe I will use the luan backer method, although I will not probably use luan, but rather a hardwood plywood. It really does make some nice looking panels, and since the RV is stored inside, I shouldn't have to worry too much about it rotting away any time soon. Even though using wood for this seems lame, there doesn't seem to be anything else affordable to put behind the aluminum...

I found a source for 4' wide aluminum coil .032" thick (same a what's on the rv now) in any length... $16.75 per linear foot. It's aircraft grade... guys use on the airstreams...

At least now I have a cost figure to go by... Not going to be cheap... but still cheaper than another RV.

-cheers
__________________

__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is online now   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-20-2014, 06:43 AM   #100
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Snowbird - Waterford Mi and Citrus Springs Fl.
Posts: 3,586
What if the alum. were laminated to fiberglass/filon, or whatever the stuff is, that they sell at Lowes/Home Depot for showers in 4x8 sheets? It's smooth on one side, and like a pebble grain on the other?

That might make it stiff enough to hold it's shape and keep it flat, and it would surely be more resistant to the rot any kind of wood you used.

Careful planning would allow it to be cut to lengths that would have joints falling on vertical ribs?
__________________

__________________
1997 37' HR Endeavor, 275hp Cat, Freightliner
03 CR-V Blue Ox, Ready Brake
ahicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2014, 07:38 AM   #101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Mission Viejo, CA
Posts: 386
You could also seal the exposed side of luan with verathane, no?
__________________
Bill Lynch
wblynch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2014, 08:50 AM   #102
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
You could also seal the exposed side of luan with verathane, no?
Yep... was thinking this myself. It wouldn't be full proof, but it should help.

I'm not sure about the stuff at lowes... but I would have to be careful to make sure it bonded well with the adhesive. I don't think it would be as rigid?

good ideas... thanks.

-cheers
__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2014, 08:56 AM   #103
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,449
Look into masonite

Stiff as all get out and not that expensive.

Also consider how ends butt as that may allow a vertical line.

Not sure if the seam could be taped like drywall or if a lamination process to insure flatness.

No real clue here but just tossing thoughts out.
__________________
Tony & Lori
1989 Country Coach Savannah SE
TQ60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2014, 09:26 AM   #104
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by TQ60 View Post
Look into masonite

Stiff as all get out and not that expensive.

Also consider how ends butt as that may allow a vertical line.

Not sure if the seam could be taped like drywall or if a lamination process to insure flatness.

No real clue here but just tossing thoughts out.
Yes, I was also thinking about that... the vertical lines you would get with using 1 thickness of backing. The rv did have a vertical line in one area from that, and it didn't look too bad. Might not be a big deal.

-cheers
__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2014, 04:10 PM   #105
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Snowbird - Waterford Mi and Citrus Springs Fl.
Posts: 3,586
Re: vertical seam, that's what I was talking about earlier. Make sure those vertical seams fall on a vertical rib. Easily done by adjusting the length of your backing material, whatever you decide on.
__________________
1997 37' HR Endeavor, 275hp Cat, Freightliner
03 CR-V Blue Ox, Ready Brake
ahicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2014, 08:03 AM   #106
Senior Member
 
rickf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Browns Mills, NJ.
Posts: 103
If you decide to go with any form of wood there is an outfit in Washington State called Rot Doctor. They have some stuff called CPES that is a wood based epoxy resin that has the consistency of diesel fuel. You brush this on the wood, especially the edges and it seals the wood against moisture. Good stuff, I have used it for years on boats.

Rick
__________________
Rick and Dianne, dogs Ranger and Shelby
1989 Winnebago Chieftain
Recently retired and now broke
rickf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2014, 01:51 PM   #107
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickf View Post
If you decide to go with any form of wood there is an outfit in Washington State called Rot Doctor. They have some stuff called CPES that is a wood based epoxy resin that has the consistency of diesel fuel. You brush this on the wood, especially the edges and it seals the wood against moisture. Good stuff, I have used it for years on boats.

Rick
Good tip... i assume it's safe to use near aluminum? Traditional pressure treating chemicals can cause aluminum to corrode... or so I have been told.

-cheers
__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 08:27 AM   #108
Senior Member
 
kustom's Avatar
 
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: costa rica / river ranch fl.
Posts: 683
why not clean up your alum sideing rough up the back side and add a few
layers of fiberglass mat
__________________
kustom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 11:11 AM   #109
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustom View Post
why not clean up your alum sideing rough up the back side and add a few
layers of fiberglass mat
I've actually considered trying to restore the old aluminum. The luan seems to fall right off the back of it, leaving only a thin layer of glue and some wood splinters.

There's actually a ton of corrosion though on the backside... far worse than anything that's visible on the exterior. I could probably grind out the corrosion, then fiberglass it, but that's gonna be far more work than just putting on new aluminum. Theoretically, I could work a few more hours at the day job to pay for the new aluminum, and be many many hours ahead of trying to repair the old aluminum. I dunno... I'll have to think about it. The two upper pieces of aluminum are in a lot better shape than the wider, lower sections... maybe it's worth a shot just to see how it turns out. Maybe it's not as much work as I think it will be,.

-cheers
__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 07:18 PM   #110
Senior Member
 
Piker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,286
I messed around with my old aluminum today for a little bit... it's definitely not worth the effort to try and salvage it. The areas that had oxidation between the aluminum and the luan are all bubbled up, and would require lots of body work once I had the new luan glued up. On top of that the contact cement is attached to the aluminum with great vigor... it would take days to remove it all...

So, now I just have to figure out whether I use new Filon or new Aluminum. I can get filon wide enough to make a single panel for each side, thereby eliminating the seam in the center. Problem is, I don't think a panel that size is going to be easy to handle without damaging.

I could cut the filon and make the walls out of 2 separate panels like they are now...

Or I could buy Aluminum and make 2 separate panels too. The aluminum only comes in 4' widths, so there would be quite a bit of waste making the top panels... and added expense.

I'm looking at about $2k for aluminum... and $1600 for filon. Not sure which would be better. I can't buy either one right now, so at this point, it doesn't really matter... just thinking ahead.

-cheers
__________________
1994 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE - Engine Rebuilt and Restoration in Process
Piker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2014, 01:44 PM   #111
Senior Member
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: FORT WORTH, TEXAS
Posts: 1,319
Try a can of the non expanding foam you get at home depot. That stuff sticks like crazy. Hada friend use it to glue all his rigid insulation to the roof of his gurage.
Bill
__________________
2003 Bounder 38N
5.9 Cummins 3000MH Allison Trans.
Towing a 2014 Honda CRV with a Blue Ox tow bar.
WILDEBILL308 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2014, 02:31 PM   #112
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Snowbird - Waterford Mi and Citrus Springs Fl.
Posts: 3,586
I would go with the Filon if for no other reason than the handling perspective. If you were to have a minor issue with Filon, no big deal. With alum. you'll have a reminder (crease) that will haunt you forever....
__________________

__________________
1997 37' HR Endeavor, 275hp Cat, Freightliner
03 CR-V Blue Ox, Ready Brake
ahicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.