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Old 02-11-2008, 07:43 AM   #1
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Winnebago Owners Club
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Appalachian Campers
Mid Atlantic Campers
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Sarver, PA/Crystal River, FL/Shelocta, PA
Posts: 4,636
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesman
--------------------------------------------------------------------

This information is current as of today, Sun Feb 10 21:01:24 2008.

Mexico

This Travel Alert updates information for U.S. citizens on security
situations in Mexico that may affect their activities while in that
country. This supersedes the previous Travel Alert for Mexico dated
April 19, 2007. This Travel Alert expires on April 15, 2008.

Narcotics-Related Violence " U.S. citizens residing and traveling
in Mexico should exercise caution when in unfamiliar areas and be
aware of their surroundings at all times. Violence by criminal
elements affects many parts of the country, urban and rural,
including border areas. In the last twelve months there have been
execution-style murders of Mexican officials in Tamaulipas,
Michoacan, Baja California, Guerrero (particularly Acapulco), Nuevo
Leon (especially in and around Monterrey), and other states. Though
there is no evidence that U.S. citizens are specifically targeted,
Mexican and foreign bystanders have been injured or killed in some
violent attacks demonstrating the heightened risk in public places.
In its effort to combat violence, the Government of Mexico has
deployed military troops in various parts of the country. U.S.
citizens are advised to cooperate with official checkpoints when
traveling on Mexican highways.

In recent years, dozens of U.S. citizens have been kidnapped in
Mexico and many cases remain unresolved. Moreover, new cases of
disappearances and kidnap-for-ransom continue to be reported. No one
can be considered immune from kidnapping on the basis of occupation,
nationality, or other factors. Criminals have been known to follow
and harass U.S. citizens traveling in their vehicles, particularly
in border areas including Nuevo Laredo, Matamoros, and Tijuana. U.S.
citizens who believe they are being followed should notify Mexican
officials as soon as possible. U.S. citizens should make every
attempt to travel on main roads during daylight hours, particularly
the toll ("cuota") roads, which are generally more secure. It is
preferable for U.S. citizens to stay in well-known tourist
destinations and tourist areas of the cities with more adequate
security, and provide an itinerary to a friend or family member not
traveling with them. U.S. citizens should avoid traveling alone as a
means to better ensure their safety. Refrain from displaying
expensive-looking jewelry, large amounts of money, or other valuable
items.

Oaxaca City " U.S. citizens traveling to Oaxaca City should be
aware that from May to November 2006, protests in Oaxaca City became
increasingly violent resulting in at least nine deaths. On October
27, 2006, a U.S. citizen was shot and killed in Oaxaca City as a
result of the violence and disorder caused by ongoing civil unrest
in the city. Although recent demonstrations have not been violent,
many of the issues that were the basis for the protests remain
unresolved. U.S. Citizens planning to travel to Oaxaca City should
check on current conditions before beginning their travel.

Demonstrations - Demonstrations occur frequently throughout Mexico
and are usually peaceful. However, even demonstrations intended to
be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence
unexpectedly. During violent demonstrations or law enforcement
operations, U.S. citizens are reminded to remain in their homes or
hotels, avoid large crowds, and avoid the downtown and surrounding
areas. Since the timing and routes of scheduled marches and
demonstrations are always subject to change, U.S. citizens should
monitor local media sources for new developments and exercise
extreme caution while within the vicinity of any protests. The State
Department reminds U.S. citizens to avoid participating in
demonstrations and other activities that might be deemed political
by Mexican authorities. The Mexican Constitution prohibits political
activities by foreigners, and such actions may result in detention
and/or deportation.

For more detailed information on staying safe in Mexico, please see
the Mexico Country Specific Information at:
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_p...s/cis_970.html . For the
latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should
regularly monitor the Department's Internet web site at
http://travel.state.gov where the current Worldwide Caution Travel
Alert, Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts can be found. Up-to-date
information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-
4747 toll free in the United States, or, for callers from Mexico, a
regular toll line at 001-202-501-4444. These numbers are available
from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday
(except U.S. federal holidays). American citizens traveling or
residing overseas are encouraged to register with the appropriate
U.S. Embassy or Consulate on the State Department's travel
registration website at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ .

For any emergencies involving U.S. citizens in Mexico, please
contact the closest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. The U.S. Embassy is
located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia
Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000;
telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance
within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000. You may also contact the Embassy by
e-mail at: ccs@... The Embassy's Internet address is
http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/ .

Consulates:
Ciudad Juarez: Avenida Lopez Mateos 924-N, telephone (52)(656) 611-
3000.
Guadalajara: Progreso 175, telephone (52)(333) 268-2100.
Hermosillo: Avenida Monterrey 141, telephone (52)(662) 289-3500.
Matamoros: Avenida Primera 2002, telephone (52)(868) 812-4402.
Merida: Calle 60 No. 338 K, telephone (52)(999) 942-5700
Monterrey: Avenida Constitucion 411 Poniente, telephone (52)(818)
345-2120.
Nogales: Calle San Jose, Nogales, Sonora, telephone (52)(631) 311-
8150.
Nuevo Laredo: Calle Allende 3330, Col. Jardin, telephone (52)(867)
714-0512.
Tijuana: Tapachula 96, telephone (52)(664) 622-7400.
__________________

__________________
Sarver, PA/Crystal River, FL/Shelocta, PA FMCA 335149 W3TLN
2005 Suncruiser 38R W24, no chassis mods needed 2013 Honda Accord EX-L 2008 Honda Odyssey EX-L

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Old 02-11-2008, 07:43 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Tom N's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Pond Piggies Club
Appalachian Campers
Mid Atlantic Campers
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Sarver, PA/Crystal River, FL/Shelocta, PA
Posts: 4,636
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesman
--------------------------------------------------------------------

This information is current as of today, Sun Feb 10 21:01:24 2008.

Mexico

This Travel Alert updates information for U.S. citizens on security
situations in Mexico that may affect their activities while in that
country. This supersedes the previous Travel Alert for Mexico dated
April 19, 2007. This Travel Alert expires on April 15, 2008.

Narcotics-Related Violence " U.S. citizens residing and traveling
in Mexico should exercise caution when in unfamiliar areas and be
aware of their surroundings at all times. Violence by criminal
elements affects many parts of the country, urban and rural,
including border areas. In the last twelve months there have been
execution-style murders of Mexican officials in Tamaulipas,
Michoacan, Baja California, Guerrero (particularly Acapulco), Nuevo
Leon (especially in and around Monterrey), and other states. Though
there is no evidence that U.S. citizens are specifically targeted,
Mexican and foreign bystanders have been injured or killed in some
violent attacks demonstrating the heightened risk in public places.
In its effort to combat violence, the Government of Mexico has
deployed military troops in various parts of the country. U.S.
citizens are advised to cooperate with official checkpoints when
traveling on Mexican highways.

In recent years, dozens of U.S. citizens have been kidnapped in
Mexico and many cases remain unresolved. Moreover, new cases of
disappearances and kidnap-for-ransom continue to be reported. No one
can be considered immune from kidnapping on the basis of occupation,
nationality, or other factors. Criminals have been known to follow
and harass U.S. citizens traveling in their vehicles, particularly
in border areas including Nuevo Laredo, Matamoros, and Tijuana. U.S.
citizens who believe they are being followed should notify Mexican
officials as soon as possible. U.S. citizens should make every
attempt to travel on main roads during daylight hours, particularly
the toll ("cuota") roads, which are generally more secure. It is
preferable for U.S. citizens to stay in well-known tourist
destinations and tourist areas of the cities with more adequate
security, and provide an itinerary to a friend or family member not
traveling with them. U.S. citizens should avoid traveling alone as a
means to better ensure their safety. Refrain from displaying
expensive-looking jewelry, large amounts of money, or other valuable
items.

Oaxaca City " U.S. citizens traveling to Oaxaca City should be
aware that from May to November 2006, protests in Oaxaca City became
increasingly violent resulting in at least nine deaths. On October
27, 2006, a U.S. citizen was shot and killed in Oaxaca City as a
result of the violence and disorder caused by ongoing civil unrest
in the city. Although recent demonstrations have not been violent,
many of the issues that were the basis for the protests remain
unresolved. U.S. Citizens planning to travel to Oaxaca City should
check on current conditions before beginning their travel.

Demonstrations - Demonstrations occur frequently throughout Mexico
and are usually peaceful. However, even demonstrations intended to
be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence
unexpectedly. During violent demonstrations or law enforcement
operations, U.S. citizens are reminded to remain in their homes or
hotels, avoid large crowds, and avoid the downtown and surrounding
areas. Since the timing and routes of scheduled marches and
demonstrations are always subject to change, U.S. citizens should
monitor local media sources for new developments and exercise
extreme caution while within the vicinity of any protests. The State
Department reminds U.S. citizens to avoid participating in
demonstrations and other activities that might be deemed political
by Mexican authorities. The Mexican Constitution prohibits political
activities by foreigners, and such actions may result in detention
and/or deportation.

For more detailed information on staying safe in Mexico, please see
the Mexico Country Specific Information at:
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_p...s/cis_970.html . For the
latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should
regularly monitor the Department's Internet web site at
http://travel.state.gov where the current Worldwide Caution Travel
Alert, Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts can be found. Up-to-date
information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-
4747 toll free in the United States, or, for callers from Mexico, a
regular toll line at 001-202-501-4444. These numbers are available
from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday
(except U.S. federal holidays). American citizens traveling or
residing overseas are encouraged to register with the appropriate
U.S. Embassy or Consulate on the State Department's travel
registration website at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ .

For any emergencies involving U.S. citizens in Mexico, please
contact the closest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. The U.S. Embassy is
located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia
Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000;
telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance
within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000. You may also contact the Embassy by
e-mail at: ccs@... The Embassy's Internet address is
http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/ .

Consulates:
Ciudad Juarez: Avenida Lopez Mateos 924-N, telephone (52)(656) 611-
3000.
Guadalajara: Progreso 175, telephone (52)(333) 268-2100.
Hermosillo: Avenida Monterrey 141, telephone (52)(662) 289-3500.
Matamoros: Avenida Primera 2002, telephone (52)(868) 812-4402.
Merida: Calle 60 No. 338 K, telephone (52)(999) 942-5700
Monterrey: Avenida Constitucion 411 Poniente, telephone (52)(818)
345-2120.
Nogales: Calle San Jose, Nogales, Sonora, telephone (52)(631) 311-
8150.
Nuevo Laredo: Calle Allende 3330, Col. Jardin, telephone (52)(867)
714-0512.
Tijuana: Tapachula 96, telephone (52)(664) 622-7400.
__________________

__________________
Sarver, PA/Crystal River, FL/Shelocta, PA FMCA 335149 W3TLN
2005 Suncruiser 38R W24, no chassis mods needed 2013 Honda Accord EX-L 2008 Honda Odyssey EX-L

Tom N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 02:15 PM   #3
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 36
Good post.
It really is a shame.
Pre - RV's we use to dirt strip up and down the Baja Peninsula.
Plenty of marvelous places to fly in. You could really enjoy secluded beaches. sleepy little villages. A real friendly local vibe. We would sleep under the wing of the aircraft and never worried about anything bad happening. To that end in a decade of flying around down there nothing did.
I have had several friends who have been had pretty tough go's in Rosarita and Ensenada. Mostly just parting with cash....
Could be a lot worse.
The charm of Mexico sure has worn off for me. I would not go down there in an M1 Abrams.
I will miss snorkeing for scallops and all night beach bonfires.
Hasta la Vista...

MG
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