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Old 05-14-2012, 07:41 PM   #57
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Being an Electrian, I would say some of you know just enough to be dangerous!
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Old 05-14-2012, 08:12 PM   #58
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One thing that has not even been mentioned here is the requirement of local codes, permits and inspections for the electrical work performed at the house. Some jurisdictions require all electrical work to be done by a licensed electrician. Other let the home owner do the work provided they have a permit and have the work inspected before the circuit is activated.

Best to check these things out first.

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Old 05-14-2012, 08:13 PM   #59
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It just amases me how literal some people take things...there's no connection to a concept. Ill let this question stand for "Mickey Mouse"....on a remodel where there are numerous trades doing their own thing(Im talking a major pool/spa/backyard remodel) where does the power come from for all the high current tools? We did mostly pool/spa new construction and remodels...our heat boxes for PVC had to have a dedicated 20 amp outlet....if we were using jack hammers, we needed another 20 amp outlet....were we supposed to install these outlets permanately? Oh well.......you gotta laugh!!

I agree about codes and permits,its always the best policy EXCEPT the OP wanted a temporary solution to running their air.....what a joke this thread has turned into..
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Old 05-14-2012, 09:03 PM   #60
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Ok. I'm not an electrician and I don't play one on tv. I read this entire past and went back and reread the original question.

The op stated that he has run his rig on 20a with the AC. But at mil house the plug gets hot. What about at the other 20a place. Did it get hot there? If not, I repeat if not. Then is it possible that the plug at mil is worn out and not making a tight connection and that is why the plug is getting hot and melting?
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Old 05-14-2012, 11:07 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by dajudge View Post
Don't, I repeat, don"t plug your 30 amp in a dryer receptacle. Adryer runs on 220 volts and that would frry everything in your rig. Ifyou have a 50 amp cord, you can plug it in a dryer receptacle, but not a 30.
NO, NO you do not plug a 50 amp into a dryer receptacle. A dryer receptacle is 220 VOLTS. A 50 amp RV plug is a 110 VOLT, and they are not compatible!
The dryer outlet can be rewired by a qualified electrican, but DO NOT plug a 30 amp OR a 50 amp into a dryer receptacle.
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Old 05-14-2012, 11:10 PM   #62
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Back to beginning

The OP wanted to know if he could plug RV into 30 A dryer outlet. He also stated 20 A plug/receptacle got hot when used with extension cord.

The plug getting hot is not unusual. Since the contact area at the receptacle has limited surface contact it is a point of higher resistance and will heat up faster than the cord itself.

Making up a cheater cord does not need a permit and is not a code violation if done properly.

Off topic - but since it was mentioned. Temporary wiring as defined in the NEC is an installation that is allowed for as long as it takes to complete the building. Is has nothing to do with this issue.
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Old 05-15-2012, 07:03 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlGeo View Post
NO, NO you do not plug a 50 amp into a dryer receptacle. A dryer receptacle is 220 VOLTS. A 50 amp RV plug is a 110 VOLT, and they are not compatible!
The dryer outlet can be rewired by a qualified electrican, but DO NOT plug a 30 amp OR a 50 amp into a dryer receptacle.

Here we are talking about the 4-pin plugs: Not every 240 volt dryer connection is wired where it is NOT compatible with a 50 amp RV plug. My dryer connection works fine with the 50 amp RV plug. You do need to get an electrican (if you are not capable) to check the plug to see if it is wired correctly and capable for RV use.

First check L1 to L2 (the two hot leads) and you should read 240 volts. Now check L1 to N and then L2 to N, it should read 120 volts across each one. N to G (ground) should read very near 0 volts.

The old 3-pin dryer and range plugs were 2 hots and a Neutral or ground.

Ken
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Old 05-15-2012, 08:58 AM   #64
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The following site i think will end all this confusing info

http://www.dasplace.net/RVWiring/wiring.html
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Old 05-15-2012, 04:16 PM   #65
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This thread is getting Sideways!

I am not licensed to do electrical work, but I have done my own for 30 plus years, and always confirm code when I do any work.

The folks who do this for a living that also have a license to do so will likely have additional comment here.

The NEC is the final rule, but each jurisdiction adds to the NEC for their own area, so local building departments can be asked questions relating to how to do specific tasks to stay within code and what permitting and licensing requiriements are in place, they usually are very helpful and can propose ideas that usually can save some cost and trouble as well as provide some peace of mind or avoid mistakes.

This is just my opinion, the OP can choose to do the work themselves, but only after doing local homework such as contacting the local inspectors office for advise or hiring a local licensed person to do the work with a permit to insure inspection and work performed to LOCAL code.

If anyone does NOT know what is expected on each position of the plug or outlet they need to stop work as they are likely to cause harm to themselves or others due to lack of the understanding of what is going on.

For starters, anytime something is getting warm that is NOT designed to get warm indicates a problem, period.

The standard 120 VAC outlet has both flat prongs verticle is a 15 amp device, NOT suitable for continous loads over 15 amps, and the HVAC is near the 15 amps.

I would guess most are rated for much LESS than 15 amps continous duty with intermittent duty being a little more.

If the outlet has one vertical and one horizontal then it is a 20 amp outlet, but again the DUTY CYCLE is what matters.

So one should NOT proceed with making adaptors to use the standard 120 vac house outlet to run the AC system and expect to run them for long periods, short intermittent duty maybe, but not advisable.

Using 15 amp devices for AC loads results in hot connections or cords, as others have stated, the part that has the highest resistance will generate the most heat, (per ohms and watts laws).

The contacts, both the mass of the material and the supporting structure simply cannot carry the current, same as using too small of a wire.

Unless it is a heater it should not get warm, there is a specification for heat rise for all equipment, power cords properly sized and properly used should not get warm, the outlet may rise a little due to connection resistance, the licensed folks can confirm if this is allowed and by how much, my rule is it should not raise enough to tell by touch.

Funky adaptors

Do not even think about a "2 in one" to use 2 vac 120 outlets to create a single 30 amp one as you have the worry of an exposed male plug that is also live.

This MAY be possible on a true (wired as 240 VAC) 50 amp MH as the 2 lines should be isolated, but this is not certian, and unless the 2 outlets are on seperate legs, if both on same side (zero vac across them) the neutral takes the full combined current of both on a single conductor and can be a problem, assuming 20 amp circuits correctly wired with 12 guage wire, each black wire carries up to 20 amps before breaker trips. White (neutral)wire carries return current for both, if 12 guage then it is rated for 20 amps and my carry 40.

If 240 vac measured across the outlets then the white wire only carries the DIFFERENCE!, so a 15 amp load on both equal zero on the white, 10 on one and 15 on the other leaves 5 and so on.

One could make an adaptor to use the RV connector, or a twist lock.

We installed a 30 amp 120 vac twist lock outlet to support one ac and floating the batteries, our coach is a 50 amp unit, but the 30 amp 120 volt cord was on hand and suitable length, the 50 amp cord too short, heavy and expensive to add another 20 feet.
,
Added the correct 50 amp twist lock device for the coach end, 30 amp plug for the house end, cord is rated 30 amp, outlet, house wires and breaker rated at 30 amp it works and does NOT get warm, was cheap to do, meets code and can be plugged into any 30 amp twist lock.

Dryer outlet.
There are many different opinions of these, and there are a couple different actual ones in use.

They are also rated at different current levels, and depending on the flavor of the installer they can be installed in any assortment of fashons.

And as stated here by others, the install may NOT meet code, and may not be safe.

Some welders use one style, others use a different one, ranges another assortment.

Someone stated to use one hot and the ground as neutral, deadly choice as the ground MAY be properly connected at the load center, but it needs to be connected at the MH, so only having a neutral and no safety ground will allow the MH chassis to "float", so a leaking device such as a heater in an ice maker (another post here someplace) can have the MH at 120 volts above ground, one could be shocked simply stepping out of the coach, current not enough to cause much harm, but the muscle control or suprise reaction to it may cause a loss of footing and broken bones.

In our shop we have dryer outlets all over the place for the welder and other 240 VAC equipment, 2 hots and safety ground, why, they are common off the shelf, inexpensive and can handle the requirements of our equipment.

Where the machine also has a 120 VAC buss it has a seperate outlet as the current requirements are smaller and requires a smaller breaker as well as keeping the breaker single leg to match the circuit.

Leave the dryer outlet alone, do NOT make any adaptors of any kind, just too risky.

You MAY be able to use the conductors feeding the dryer outlet to ADD a new outlet that can be used.

Many options here, given dryers are NOT sold with a cord, AND they usually last for some time, the existing dryer outlet can be removed and replaced with a industry standard 50 amp outlet, this would require the neutral to be added if not present, and would retain the 2 hot legs and the safety ground.

The existing plug on the dryer cord is cut off and a new 50 amp male is added.

Now it is simple plug and play, and in CODE.

All off the shelf parts, and can have a plug in adaptor also off the shelf to adapt to RV30 amp, or direct connection to RV50 amp, and would allow for just about any 240 volt device to be used as long as it is single phase and has the correct plug.

IF there is a 120 vac outlet that you want to use you will need to verify that it actually is wired with 12 guage wire, and that it is properly wired with 12 guage wire all the way back to the load center, and that it has a 20 amp breaker.

many residential installations use 14 guage wire after the first outlet if they even use 12, then they use the outlets as junction connections where the power comes in on the top screws, jumps to the lower ones via a removable jumper to allow switched outlets then on to the next one.

This jumper can blow out, and if push in connections use other headaches.

If a CORRECTLY wired outlet exists then it could be removed and a high quality 20 amp outlet installed in its place to allow suitable adaptor that is properly rated to be used to adapt to the RV cord.
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Old 05-15-2012, 05:31 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TQ60 View Post
This thread is getting Sideways!

I am not licensed to do electrical work, but I have done my own for 30 plus years, and always confirm code when I do any work.

The folks who do this for a living that also have a license to do so will likely have additional comment here.

The NEC is the final rule, but each jurisdiction adds to the NEC for their own area, so local building departments can be asked questions relating to how to do specific tasks to stay within code and what permitting and licensing requiriements are in place, they usually are very helpful and can propose ideas that usually can save some cost and trouble as well as provide some peace of mind or avoid mistakes.

This is just my opinion, the OP can choose to do the work themselves, but only after doing local homework such as contacting the local inspectors office for advise or hiring a local licensed person to do the work with a permit to insure inspection and work performed to LOCAL code.

If anyone does NOT know what is expected on each position of the plug or outlet they need to stop work as they are likely to cause harm to themselves or others due to lack of the understanding of what is going on.

For starters, anytime something is getting warm that is NOT designed to get warm indicates a problem, period.

The standard 120 VAC outlet has both flat prongs verticle is a 15 amp device, NOT suitable for continous loads over 15 amps, and the HVAC is near the 15 amps.

I would guess most are rated for much LESS than 15 amps continous duty with intermittent duty being a little more.

If the outlet has one vertical and one horizontal then it is a 20 amp outlet, but again the DUTY CYCLE is what matters.

So one should NOT proceed with making adaptors to use the standard 120 vac house outlet to run the AC system and expect to run them for long periods, short intermittent duty maybe, but not advisable.

Using 15 amp devices for AC loads results in hot connections or cords, as others have stated, the part that has the highest resistance will generate the most heat, (per ohms and watts laws).

The contacts, both the mass of the material and the supporting structure simply cannot carry the current, same as using too small of a wire.

Unless it is a heater it should not get warm, there is a specification for heat rise for all equipment, power cords properly sized and properly used should not get warm, the outlet may rise a little due to connection resistance, the licensed folks can confirm if this is allowed and by how much, my rule is it should not raise enough to tell by touch.

Funky adaptors

Do not even think about a "2 in one" to use 2 vac 120 outlets to create a single 30 amp one as you have the worry of an exposed male plug that is also live.

This MAY be possible on a true (wired as 240 VAC) 50 amp MH as the 2 lines should be isolated, but this is not certian, and unless the 2 outlets are on seperate legs, if both on same side (zero vac across them) the neutral takes the full combined current of both on a single conductor and can be a problem, assuming 20 amp circuits correctly wired with 12 guage wire, each black wire carries up to 20 amps before breaker trips. White (neutral)wire carries return current for both, if 12 guage then it is rated for 20 amps and my carry 40.

If 240 vac measured across the outlets then the white wire only carries the DIFFERENCE!, so a 15 amp load on both equal zero on the white, 10 on one and 15 on the other leaves 5 and so on.

One could make an adaptor to use the RV connector, or a twist lock.

We installed a 30 amp 120 vac twist lock outlet to support one ac and floating the batteries, our coach is a 50 amp unit, but the 30 amp 120 volt cord was on hand and suitable length, the 50 amp cord too short, heavy and expensive to add another 20 feet.
,
Added the correct 50 amp twist lock device for the coach end, 30 amp plug for the house end, cord is rated 30 amp, outlet, house wires and breaker rated at 30 amp it works and does NOT get warm, was cheap to do, meets code and can be plugged into any 30 amp twist lock.

Dryer outlet.
There are many different opinions of these, and there are a couple different actual ones in use.

They are also rated at different current levels, and depending on the flavor of the installer they can be installed in any assortment of fashons.

And as stated here by others, the install may NOT meet code, and may not be safe.

Some welders use one style, others use a different one, ranges another assortment.

Someone stated to use one hot and the ground as neutral, deadly choice as the ground MAY be properly connected at the load center, but it needs to be connected at the MH, so only having a neutral and no safety ground will allow the MH chassis to "float", so a leaking device such as a heater in an ice maker (another post here someplace) can have the MH at 120 volts above ground, one could be shocked simply stepping out of the coach, current not enough to cause much harm, but the muscle control or suprise reaction to it may cause a loss of footing and broken bones.

In our shop we have dryer outlets all over the place for the welder and other 240 VAC equipment, 2 hots and safety ground, why, they are common off the shelf, inexpensive and can handle the requirements of our equipment.

Where the machine also has a 120 VAC buss it has a seperate outlet as the current requirements are smaller and requires a smaller breaker as well as keeping the breaker single leg to match the circuit.

Leave the dryer outlet alone, do NOT make any adaptors of any kind, just too risky.

You MAY be able to use the conductors feeding the dryer outlet to ADD a new outlet that can be used.

Many options here, given dryers are NOT sold with a cord, AND they usually last for some time, the existing dryer outlet can be removed and replaced with a industry standard 50 amp outlet, this would require the neutral to be added if not present, and would retain the 2 hot legs and the safety ground.

The existing plug on the dryer cord is cut off and a new 50 amp male is added.

Now it is simple plug and play, and in CODE.

All off the shelf parts, and can have a plug in adaptor also off the shelf to adapt to RV30 amp, or direct connection to RV50 amp, and would allow for just about any 240 volt device to be used as long as it is single phase and has the correct plug.

IF there is a 120 vac outlet that you want to use you will need to verify that it actually is wired with 12 guage wire, and that it is properly wired with 12 guage wire all the way back to the load center, and that it has a 20 amp breaker.

many residential installations use 14 guage wire after the first outlet if they even use 12, then they use the outlets as junction connections where the power comes in on the top screws, jumps to the lower ones via a removable jumper to allow switched outlets then on to the next one.

This jumper can blow out, and if push in connections use other headaches.

If a CORRECTLY wired outlet exists then it could be removed and a high quality 20 amp outlet installed in its place to allow suitable adaptor that is properly rated to be used to adapt to the RV cord.
please, close this thread before someone gets hurt..
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:22 PM   #67
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Well

Many non-electricians on here making claims on how dangerous or not this idea is. Many have gone way off topic.

The 30 dryer outlet 3 pronged is a grounded outlet. The grounded conductor is aslo allowed to be used as the so-called safety ground and has safely been used in millions of homes for years.

NEC does not permit this for NEW installations.

The neutral is tied to the enclosure at the service by the main bonding jumper. That's why it is called an intentionally grounded conductor.

The receptacle will supply 240 V or 120 V at any combination as long as the current through the 2 pole circuit breaker does not exceed 30 A in either pole. They are tied together so they both trip simultaneously. If there is over 30 A flowing through one leg and back through the neutral, or over 30A flowing from L1 to L2 and none through the neutral, the breaker will trip. Or any combination exceeding 30 A. The outlet does not know what is plugged into it, dryer, welder or RV.

If you plug an RV using one line and the neutral the plug will supply 30 A at 120 volts. No problem. The RV is grounded through the neutral just like a dryer would be.

Make an adapter. If you know what you are doing this is safe and will work.

Plugging in a 30 A 120 V RV through an adapter to a 30 A 220 V dryer outlet is perfectly acceptacle.
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:31 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgr81 View Post
Make an adapter. If you know what you are doing this is safe and will work.

Plugging in a 30 A 120 V RV through an adapter to a 30 A 220 V dryer outlet is perfectly acceptacle.
I made one and it works just fine.
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:15 PM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgr81 View Post

Make an adapter. If you know what you are doing this is safe and will work.

Plugging in a 30 A 120 V RV through an adapter to a 30 A 220 V dryer outlet is perfectly acceptacle.
Yeah another correct answer.

Ken
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:30 PM   #70
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If the dryer outlet uses a neutral you can do it with a custom pigtail. Otherwise, no.
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