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Old 08-28-2009, 02:00 PM   #1
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best parking surface for tires

We have just purchased our first Class A - a 2003, 34 foot, Winnebago Brave with living room and bedroom slide. As we live in a townhouse we are having to rent a parking spot away from our home. We live in the northwest coast and often have long, cool rainy seasons when our coach will be parked for months.
What do you think the ideal parking surface is to extend the life of our tires? We have an offer of a parking space in a coworker's property. He has an area of blacktop, and an area of dirt/grass, at present to choose from. He has also told us he is going to be packing down a dirt area and bringing in gravel.
Something tells me the gravel would be the best surface for extended parking. What do you recommend? And should we be parking with our jacks extended, or is that a bad idea?
Any personal information is highly appreciated. We have been loving all the good info we have been getting since joining this forum.
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Old 08-28-2009, 02:12 PM   #2
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I would prefer the asphalt, I would also add sections of 2 x 12 boards to park on. I extend my jacks and also cover the tires.
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Old 08-28-2009, 07:07 PM   #3
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thanks jim and judy for the quick reply

Nobody else with an opinion??
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Old 08-28-2009, 07:23 PM   #4
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Jacks down is fine. On tires it's best to keep them away from moisture like in grass or dirt. So, asphalt would be good. Leaving tires parked for long periods is not a good thing so go at least for a ride monthly.
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Old 08-28-2009, 07:44 PM   #5
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Old 08-28-2009, 07:49 PM   #6
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Our coach moves often enough that I don't worry about it.
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Old 08-28-2009, 09:11 PM   #7
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Our coach is parked in the shed with white rock under it. I placed plastic over the white rock and then more plastic under the tires. I did not want moisture to come up under the coach and especially wanted to keep the tires dry. If and when the economy recovers, I hope to pour concrete in the entire shed. I would still place plastic under the tires to protect them.
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Old 08-28-2009, 09:34 PM   #8
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8" slab of crete at the rv dock/port

we parked on gravel for 2 years in north bama, every time it rained i had to readjust the jacks so the door would close right on the cabinets

i would lean in the asphalt with wide blocks to spread the load of the jack pads so they dont sink to much
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Old 08-28-2009, 10:04 PM   #9
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Concrete is the better choice as asphalt has petroleum based products in it and after a time of just sitting the tires can be damaged (what I have read). So if it is asphalt, use 2 X 12 X whatever length. The important thing is to keep the tires evenly distibuted on the boards. Do not have any of the tire overhanging the board.

Even on concrete, for extended periods of time, I would use boards. Only because they elevate the tires from someone spilling a substance that can be detrimental to the rubber.

I figure that these people know how to store there tires. This is from the Michelin RV Tire Guide.

FROM MICHELIN:
"LONG TERM STORAGE AND RV TIRES
Unless the RV owner is a full-time RV-er, the vehicle
probably spends some time in long-term storage. But what
the RV owner probably didn’t know is that rubber tires age
when not being used. So, if the owner must store the RV,
a cool, dry, sealed garage is the best bet. Also, some storage
surfaces can cause tires to age faster. That’s why Michelin
recommends placing a barrier (cardboard, plastic or
plywood) between the tire and the storage surface.
Here are some other steps the RV owner can take to help
reduce the aging effects from long-term storage:
1) Thoroughly clean tires with soap and water before
placing into storage.
2) Cover tires to block direct sunlight and ultraviolet rays.
3) Store out of a high ozone area.
Note: When a vehicle is stored, tires should be inflated to
the inflation pressure indicated on the sidewall.
Before removing the vehicle from long-term storage,
thoroughly inspect each tire — this includes sidewalls, tread
area, and air pressure. If the tires have lost air, be sure to
inflate them to the correct pressure before driving."

You can read some more on tire maintenance at: Suite 101


Notice that Goodyear states you can go 25% over pressure, but continue to read because it state to NOT exceed the maximum pressure. So if your weight is such that your tires are inflated at 82 pounds, and the maximum is 110, then you can inflate to 110, but if you are inflated at 95 pounds, you can still only inflate to 110 pounds if that is the maximum inflation pressure.

Edited: If you do decide to store with jacks down, before taking them up, wipe down the piston with a clean rag and some transmission fluid. It will get any crud of that has accumulated while in storage.
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Old 08-28-2009, 11:32 PM   #10
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I bought 3 truck mud flaps that are used on the rear trailer wheels. I cut one in half and put a half under each of the front tires. I use a whole mud flap under each of the rear tires. Now I don't have to worry about the surface I am parked on for extended stays anymore. Bought them at Pilot for about $12 each I think
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Old 08-28-2009, 11:59 PM   #11
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Everything I have read indicates concrete is the worst surface for tires due to the moisture transfer back and forth. Any surface where they will sit in water after rain, etc is bad. Of your choices between asphalt or dirt, I would go with the asphalt and use vapor barriers under the tires. Using wood that elevates the tires slightly above the surfact would make it very unlikely they would ever stand in water. Gravel also would be acceptable to me as water would not likely stand on it either. And I would cover the tires wherever it is parked.

As KIX said, it is best for the coach if you drive it about 30 minutes once every 4 to 6 weeks -- that is what we did when we "stored" our coach before we started fulltiming.
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Old 08-29-2009, 09:19 AM   #12
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Best Parking surface in winter is Arizona and in summer, Montana.




Quote:
Originally Posted by bigenna View Post
We have just purchased our first Class A - a 2003, 34 foot, Winnebago Brave with living room and bedroom slide. As we live in a townhouse we are having to rent a parking spot away from our home. We live in the northwest coast and often have long, cool rainy seasons when our coach will be parked for months.
What do you think the ideal parking surface is to extend the life of our tires? We have an offer of a parking space in a coworker's property. He has an area of blacktop, and an area of dirt/grass, at present to choose from. He has also told us he is going to be packing down a dirt area and bringing in gravel.
Something tells me the gravel would be the best surface for extended parking. What do you recommend? And should we be parking with our jacks extended, or is that a bad idea?
Any personal information is highly appreciated. We have been loving all the good info we have been getting since joining this forum.
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Old 08-29-2009, 09:42 AM   #13
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All that I have read indicates asphalt as being a bad culprit, but nothing was mentined about concrete. A search on the words "rv tire storage" without the quotes will render a lot of information.

Here is one from RVing with Mark Polk

Regardless of the surface, I would still use a wooden vapor barrier.
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Old 08-29-2009, 01:41 PM   #14
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Thanks for all the replies

So I think, for this winter at least, it is going to be up on wood blocks, over blacktop. The driving for 30 minutes every month or so will be a problem, however, as we will only have storage insurance on the rig from about October through early April. Hopefully, just maybe moving the wood blocks several inches back and forth monthly will help so at least the tires won't be sitting on exactly the same spot for months.

Hamguy, I like your idea the best, (Best Parking surface in winter is Arizona and in summer, Montana.) though it will have to wait for hubby's retirement the following winter.
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