Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > MH-General Discussions & Problems
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-01-2006, 04:08 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
machman72's Avatar
 
Appalachian Campers
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: La Grange, North Carolina
Posts: 327
I would have to agree with Paul. The concrete leaches the moisture out of the tire material. I have been in the construction industry for 15 yrs. We have to place a vapor barrier on the ground before concrete is poured as the concrete will suck moisture up out of the ground. It does the same from the top down. Concrete is a porous material and attracts and holds water. This is one of the reasons rebar and wire mesh will rust inside of concrete. It is slow, but it does take place. If water is gathering inside of a tire and damaging the steel belts, this is more than likley due to condensation, not leeching. The concrete area covered by the tire keeps this portion of the tire cooler than the rest that is subject to hotter direct sun and air, thus condensation. Same reason HVAC ducts will sweat if not well insulated. Oh and don't forget the moisture that gets put in your tires every time you put air in them. There is moisture inside the air tank and it goes straight into your tires.
__________________

__________________
Your never too old to have a happy childhood.
machman72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-01-2006, 04:49 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 3,189
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by machman72:
I would have to agree with Paul. The concrete leaches the moisture out of the tire material. I have been in the construction industry for 15 yrs. We have to place a vapor barrier on the ground before concrete is poured as the concrete will suck moisture up out of the ground. It does the same from the top down. Concrete is a porous material and attracts and holds water. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

My father was a manager at Tyre Rubber and Roll for over 40 years and this blurb from a tire care site pretty much matches what he always told us:

"When a tire is manufactured, a stabilizer molecule is added to the tire polymer. This molecule is called a "competitive absorber" and will work to protect against ozone and UV damage by capturing and absorbing UV radiation and converting it to heat which is dissipated harmlessly. Carbon black is the "competitive absorber" all tire manufacturers use. This is why tires are black, not a color to match your car or your taste. Ozone, a part of the air, combined with sunlight, causes the degrading of rubber tires which results in dry rot, discoloration, cracking and splitting."

So when you park on concrete especialy in a hot climate you accelerate the loss of the tires moisture and the carbon black through the absorptive properties of the concrete and the thermal dynamic flow of heat from the warmer tire to the cooler concrete below. This loss of the "competitive absorber" then leave the tire more vulnerable to ozone damage and dry rot.
__________________

__________________
Neil V
2001 Winnebago Adventurer WFG35U
NeilV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2006, 11:00 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Steady Eddie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: The Great Pacific Northwet
Posts: 382
Good Evening--

Here's another link:

http://www.rangerdesign.com/RangerDe...dingStrips.htm

Its' text perhaps explains the absorption of moisture INTO

the tires better the the World Famous "Shade Tree Mechanic" of

the TV Show of the same name.
__________________

__________________
Steady Eddie/1999 KSCA 3357/P12 Chassis/454 Vortec L-21

Allison transmisson
Steady Eddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
RV Leveling blocks BigRedLancer MH-General Discussions & Problems 8 07-09-2008 12:19 PM
Leveling Blocks Necessary? 69RoadRunner Newmar Owner's Forum 21 05-28-2008 01:09 PM
Fuse blocks CharlieM Newmar Owner's Forum 6 01-19-2007 06:31 PM
truck levelling blocks rockman Truck Camper Discussion 8 03-01-2005 03:57 PM
Leveling Blocks Necessary? MH-General Discussions & Problems 21 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.