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Old 01-25-2016, 08:15 AM   #1
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CO and Combustible Gas Alarms Help

My alarm on the LP gas side keeps going off if just turn the stove on for a second. It will go off in the middle of the night for no reason. I am thinking of going to a CO monitor along with my normal smoke alarm. Any experience out there on this subject. Thanks
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Old 01-25-2016, 08:21 AM   #2
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Your propane alarm could be old. Also, do you have a dog that lounges around the alarm? Sometimes battery charging/gassing will set it off.

Do you ever get a odor when stove is fired up? For a CO monitor... get a expensive and sensitive one and set it about eye level.
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Old 01-25-2016, 11:18 AM   #3
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Odds are the sensor on your LP alarm is contaminated and has made it ultra-sensitive. Replace it.

A CO alarm is a good idea too, but not a replacement for LP. It is doing something different altogether. I do not recommend the combo LP & CO units because a CO detector should be placed higher than an LP detector. LP and similar fumes sink near the floor, but CO floats through the air and mixes with it. The CO detector should be about half wall height while the LP should be down low.
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Old 01-25-2016, 11:40 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by TCHB View Post
My alarm on the LP gas side keeps going off if just turn the stove on for a second. It will go off in the middle of the night for no reason. I am thinking of going to a CO monitor along with my normal smoke alarm. Any experience out there on this subject. Thanks
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LP alarms can be triggered by the out gassing from flooded lead acid, (or gel cell), batteries.
See: Rotten Egg smell
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Old 01-25-2016, 02:58 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary RVRoamer View Post
Odds are the sensor on your LP alarm is contaminated and has made it ultra-sensitive. Replace it.

A CO alarm is a good idea too, but not a replacement for LP. It is doing something different altogether. I do not recommend the combo LP & CO units because a CO detector should be placed higher than an LP detector. LP and similar fumes sink near the floor, but CO floats through the air and mixes with it. The CO detector should be about half wall height while the LP should be down low.

Great advice!
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Old 01-25-2016, 06:01 PM   #6
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Many of the detectors are able to be plugged into an electrical outlet. The reason being that, since carbon monoxide is a heavy gas, the detector should be placed below bed height where it will detect the gas before anyone is harmed by it.

Household chemicals should be stored at least 5 feet away from the detectors to prevent damage to the alarm. Additionally, locate the detector away from fuel-burning appliances, gas and wood-burning stoves or automobile engines to prevent the alarm from being accidentally triggered.
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Old 01-25-2016, 06:08 PM   #7
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Many of the detectors are able to be plugged into an electrical outlet. The reason being that, since carbon monoxide is a heavy gas, the detector should be placed below bed height where it will detect the gas before anyone is harmed by it.

Household chemicals should be stored at least 5 feet away from the detectors to prevent damage to the alarm. Additionally, locate the detector away from fuel-burning appliances, gas and wood-burning stoves or automobile engines to prevent the alarm from being accidentally triggered.
CO is slightly lighter than air, but mixes readily with air simply by someone walking through the room.. I refer you to Gary RVroamer's post.
LP gas is heavier than air, I think you got the two mixed up. http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/mo...or-d_1156.html
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Old 01-25-2016, 06:52 PM   #8
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Since we're on the topic of detectors.....

I know that smoke detectors have a specific lifespan and need to be replaced appropriately. What about LP detectors? I have one built in to my coach so that means it's at least 10 years old. It seems to be functioning properly, but should it be replaced anyway?
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Old 01-25-2016, 07:14 PM   #9
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Here is one I am looking at that does both natural gas and propane.

KIDDE PLUG IN COMBINATION COMBUSTIBLE GAS AND CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR WITH 9 VOLT BATTERY BACK UP


by Kidde


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Price: $77.61 ($77.61 / EA) & FREE Shipping





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In stock.






Estimated Delivery Date: Feb. 2 - 5 when you choose Standard at checkout.




Ships from and sold by Marquee Supply.














The Kidde 900-0113 AC powered, plug-in CO and explosive gas alarm protects you and your family from two deadly threats; The 900-0113 includes 9V battery back up that provides protection during a power outage, when AC-only units can not provide protection;
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Old 01-25-2016, 07:15 PM   #10
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Since we're on the topic of detectors.....

I know that smoke detectors have a specific lifespan and need to be replaced appropriately. What about LP detectors? I have one built in to my coach so that means it's at least 10 years old. It seems to be functioning properly, but should it be replaced anyway?
On the back of mine it says 3 years.
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Old 01-25-2016, 07:20 PM   #11
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My wife has a pair of leather shoes that will set the LP sensor off if she sits them on the floor in front of it. Makes her mad when I tell her that her feet stink so bad that the sensor thinks there is a propane leak. I figure it's the waterproofing on the shoes that gives off a gas of some sort or possibly something from the leather tanning. As somebody else said, the sensor needs replacing as they get overly sensitive with age. The unit in mine says to replace every five years but had to be replaced after 2 1/2. It's funny how o2 sensors and smoke detector batteries only go bad at 2am.
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Old 01-26-2016, 08:15 AM   #12
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"Mac the Fire Guy" has info on his web site...
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Old 01-26-2016, 04:37 PM   #13
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Many of the detectors are able to be plugged into an electrical outlet. The reason being that, since carbon monoxide is a heavy gas, the detector should be placed below bed height where it will detect the gas before anyone is harmed by it.

Household chemicals should be stored at least 5 feet away from the detectors to prevent damage to the alarm. Additionally, locate the detector away from fuel-burning appliances, gas and wood-burning stoves or automobile engines to prevent the alarm from being accidentally triggered.
This is an outrageous statement as are OP offerings. CO mixes with air readily and is by molecular diffusion transfer or cause by convection not walking through a room. CO detectors can be placed on ceiling - mid wall and low wall and many commercial devices are made to do so. The latest production of commercial devices are combination CO and smoke detectors. these are for ceiling mount only and are most effective for toxic gas detection. the only disadvantage to combination detectors is that a CO detector has a 5-6 year life. An Ion SD is good for ten years and Photoelectric is good as long as they are clean and past the operational test.

the only devices to be placed low are propane detectors as propane is heavier than air and normally will sink to the lowest point as will many petrochemical off gassing liquids.. CO alarms should be placed with in the proximity to CO producing devices to provide early warning. CO detectors and smoke detectors should be install within 10 feet of sleeping area entrances. They should not be placed in areas that are not normal living environments or extreme temperature. there are other specialty environmental detectors that must be place at specified elevation based on the density of the substance and temperature do to stratification.

i have been in the fire alarm business for 35 years and am certified by NICET for licences in NJ as we install all types of industrial detection devices. If anyone has a specific question send a PM. Hope i put to rest the many inaccuracies and wives tales of gases and detection. be safe. one smoke detector in every room every where. FIRE IS FAST.
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Old 01-26-2016, 09:11 PM   #14
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This is an outrageous statement as are OP offerings. CO mixes with air readily and is by molecular diffusion transfer or cause by convection not walking through a room. CO detectors can be placed on ceiling - mid wall and low wall and many commercial devices are made to do so. The latest production of commercial devices are combination CO and smoke detectors. these are for ceiling mount only and are most effective for toxic gas detection. the only disadvantage to combination detectors is that a CO detector has a 5-6 year life. An Ion SD is good for ten years and Photoelectric is good as long as they are clean and past the operational test.

the only devices to be placed low are propane detectors as propane is heavier than air and normally will sink to the lowest point as will many petrochemical off gassing liquids.. CO alarms should be placed with in the proximity to CO producing devices to provide early warning. CO detectors and smoke detectors should be install within 10 feet of sleeping area entrances. They should not be placed in areas that are not normal living environments or extreme temperature. there are other specialty environmental detectors that must be place at specified elevation based on the density of the substance and temperature do to stratification.

i have been in the fire alarm business for 35 years and am certified by NICET for licences in NJ as we install all types of industrial detection devices. If anyone has a specific question send a PM. Hope i put to rest the many inaccuracies and wives tales of gases and detection. be safe. one smoke detector in every room every where. FIRE IS FAST.
Ok can you put one of these new CO/Combustible gas alarms in the RV about 2ft off the ground?
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