Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > MH-General Discussions & Problems
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-02-2012, 05:41 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Jchet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Clermont fl
Posts: 182
Filter question 8.1 Cummings

There seems to be a filter that wasn't changed when I had my PMI folks service this last month. This filter appears to be the original filter on the engine. Can someone perhaps identify its purpose?

__________________

__________________
J.Chet USAF LTC Retired
Teddy & Bella (Soft Coated Wheaten's)
Jchet is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-02-2012, 05:46 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
palehorse89's Avatar


 
Newmar Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,731
If it is on the housing that the upper radiator hose is on my guess would be a coolant filter
__________________

__________________
2000 Newmar MADP 4060, 350ISC, Spartan MM, IFS 2011 Jeep JK, M&G Braking, 2014 MTI 27' Hog Hauler, Wireless brake control, 2006Ultra & 1989 Springer
palehorse89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 08:03 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Papa_Jim's Avatar
 
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Manitoba,Canada
Posts: 2,638
You have the same engine as I have in my coach. Cummins C8.3

The filter in the picture is called the coolant filter. Actually, more importantly, it contains the necessary coolant additives to keep the coolant in a balanced PH, when changed regularly.

Considering that your coolant filter has never been changed, possibly your coolant has never been changed either. I think it might be wise to go to your local Cummins dealer for new coolant, new coolant filter, and PH strips. You use the PH strips to test the PH of the coolant, which tells you what coolant additives need to be added. Cummins have coolant filters with different levels of coolant additives, they also have coolant filters with no coolant additives.

Because the Cummins C8.3 engine has wet cylinder sleeves, coolant in poor condition can cause cavitation on the outside of the cylinder sleeves. This leads to coolant leaking into the engine oil. It is very expensive to repair.
__________________
Jim & Kate
2016 Creekside 23RKS
2014 Ram 1500 4X4 Eco Diesel
Canada, eh?
Papa_Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 08:17 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Qwert66's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 762
Send a message via Skype™ to Qwert66
Great advice.
On mine it points down and is located rightnext to the oil filter with a manual rotary valve directly above to shut-off coolant while changing. Filter says 4 units whatever that relates to additive I'm not sure.

I change it every 2 years and test every 6mo. with strips.
__________________
1999 Newmar Mountain Aire MADP 4080, Cummins ISC 8.3L, Allison, Spartan MM IFS, Howard Power Center, Chev Trailblazer LTZ Towed w/ BlueOx rigging, Segway X2.
www.shaw11.com
Qwert66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 07:14 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: st.charles mo.
Posts: 1,194
The chemical that is in this filter is very important to the life of a cummins engine. Cummins has the test srips to check for this and they also make the chemical in a liquid form so you can add it to your cooling system.
__________________
speed racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 08:27 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Papa_Jim's Avatar
 
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Manitoba,Canada
Posts: 2,638
I notice in your picture, there's a black plastic handle in the housing just before the filter. That's the rotary valve to close so you can shut off the coolant supply to the filter for changing it.

I advise that you do not try to close that valve. It was made of plastic, can be very brittle and can break very easily, and was replaced by Cummins many years ago with a stainless steel replacement. Of course, they wouldn't do it unless you went to them and requested it. So most of us still have the original black plastic valve.

Simply open the drain cock on your radiator to drain enough coolant from the system to allow you to change the filter.
__________________
Jim & Kate
2016 Creekside 23RKS
2014 Ram 1500 4X4 Eco Diesel
Canada, eh?
Papa_Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 05:55 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Jchet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Clermont fl
Posts: 182
I got spooked about the coolant PH levels and I'm guessing its the original filter from 1995 looking at it. I took the coach to a Cummins facility in Orlando today to have them change it and check the coolant PH. I also see some coolant leaking on the ground that needs fixed.

I also think the alternator may be shot as the volt meter is reading 10.5 while driving it there today so were not charging properly. Noticed this when I drove to GA in Aug but it would stay at 12V until the end of the day, but its dropping quicker.
__________________
J.Chet USAF LTC Retired
Teddy & Bella (Soft Coated Wheaten's)
Jchet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 06:22 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,452
Actually it's not the PH that a filter can add or change. It's the SCA's, in the case of Cummins they add DCA to the system. Let the SCA's get too low or none at all you could be looking at rebuilding the engine and new cyl. liners. The SCA's keep cavitation in check and prevent the cavitation from eating through the liner walls.
The PH of the water is kind of important but not as much as the SCA's
Cummins publishes specs for both.
Where's Gary?
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 07:50 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Papa_Jim's Avatar
 
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Manitoba,Canada
Posts: 2,638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_D View Post
Actually it's not the PH that a filter can add or change. It's the SCA's, in the case of Cummins they add DCA to the system. Let the SCA's get too low or none at all you could be looking at rebuilding the engine and new cyl. liners. The SCA's keep cavitation in check and prevent the cavitation from eating through the liner walls.
The PH of the water is kind of important but not as much as the SCA's
Cummins publishes specs for both.
Where's Gary?
Yes. This info is right. SCA (Supplemental Coolant Additive) is what is in the coolant filter. It's what you need to add to the coolant based on what the test strips tell you. I don't know how I got to thinking PH, maybe it's an age thing. Anyway, the bottom line, if you don't maintain your coolant, you can end up with cavitated liners and lots of engine damage.
__________________
Jim & Kate
2016 Creekside 23RKS
2014 Ram 1500 4X4 Eco Diesel
Canada, eh?
Papa_Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 02:24 PM   #10
Registered User


 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 3,198
Just to make sure i'm not going off the deep end with another maintenance item...

This stuff is no longer an issue with a newer motor, such as my '08, because they used different coolant, right?
Does that also mean it doesn't have to be an issue with older engine if coolant is flushed and changed and the newer stuff is used?
__________________
JimM68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2012, 08:55 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Papa_Jim's Avatar
 
Outdoors RV Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Manitoba,Canada
Posts: 2,638
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimM68 View Post
Just to make sure i'm not going off the deep end with another maintenance item...

This stuff is no longer an issue with a newer motor, such as my '08, because they used different coolant, right?
Does that also mean it doesn't have to be an issue with older engine if coolant is flushed and changed and the newer stuff is used?
Either coolant can be used with any diesel engines, regardless of age.

Diesel engines with "wet" liners are prone to cavitation of the cylinder liners. "Wet"liners are in constant contact with the coolant, so they conduct cylinder heat to the coolant better than "dry" liners.

Usually "wet" liners are a transition fit in the cylinder block, using O-ring seals to keep the coolant from leaking into the oil crankcase, and using the cylinder head gasket to hold the top of the liner in position. These liners create high frequency vibrations which cause air bubbles to form on the outer wall of the liner. When the bubbles burst, the coolant crashes against the liner and forms a pit in the liner wall. If this situation continues long enough, these pits will increase in size until a hole is formed in the liner wall. This is called liner cavitation.

In an effort to prevent this, different approaches regarding coolant have been used over the years. Regular automotive antifreeze will not work. It has to be a heavy duty diesel antifreeze with Supplemental Coolant Additives (SCA). The problem is that SCA additives wear out with time. Test strips are available to dip in the coolant every 6 months to check the condition of the SCA additive in the coolant. SCA additives can be purchased to add to the coolant.

Coolant filters contain SCA additives in a form that is released into the coolant slowly over time. Also, coolant filters can be purchased without SCA additives, which can be used if the filter needs replacing but the SCA level in the coolant is high enough.

There are newer formulations of coolants that do not require SCA's. They are created using an Organic Acid Technology (OAT). There are no
silicates, borates, nitrates, phosphates, etc. in OAT coolant that can affect liner cavitation. So, there are no SCA levels to test every 6 months.

Reportedly, these OAT coolants are good for 600,000 miles or 6 years. The coolant needs a can of extender added at 300,000 miles or 3 years.

Do not use SCA additives or SCA filters with OAT coolants. It will
contaminate the coolant, which will require flushing out the system and starting over with new coolant.

It can be confusing to know which coolant you have, and where to get
the right coolant. Most truck shops are knowledgeable about and able to supply the SCA and OAT coolants.

So, either the SCA based coolants, or the newer OAT coolants will provide the liner cavitation protection that you need. The newer OAT coolants offer the benefit of extended service intervals.
__________________

__________________
Jim & Kate
2016 Creekside 23RKS
2014 Ram 1500 4X4 Eco Diesel
Canada, eh?
Papa_Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.