Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > MH-General Discussions & Problems
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-08-2011, 03:57 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
GSGracie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Christchurch, NZ
Posts: 313
Send a message via Skype™ to GSGracie
If you do not want to use the Levellers...

to lift the wheels to change them, then what do you use? I cannot find a bottle jack (very scary as they are not stable unless on level ground and hard seal) that has a higher rating than 3 ton. If I get a trolley jack, it seems that I am carrying a lot of extra weight (and volume) for the few times I might need to use it.
__________________

__________________
Graham Gracie in a 1999 Mirada, V10 Petrol. New Zealand, Suzuki Escudo 2001 2.5L V6. Mini poodle, Pierre and mini schnauzer, Maddie.
GSGracie is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-08-2011, 04:38 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
FDchief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 563
When I had my brake recall done, I saw that the Workhorse service center used the leveling jacks, then placed stands under the axles. They did this on all rigs being repaired.
__________________

__________________

Greg & Lynn (Full-Timing)
2011 Phaeton 42 QBH / Spartan Chassis
2003 Jeep GC Overland in Tow
FDchief is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 06:02 AM   #3
paz
Senior Member
 
paz's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Full-timers - Home is where we park it.
Posts: 4,716
Most RV repair places, truck tire dealers, and roadside services use high capacity bottle jacks that are powered by compressed air, although one place I was at had jacks with traditional handles.

Google "truck jacks," and you'll come up with a whole bunch of options. You'll need at least 8 or 10 tons for an RV. Most of the truck jacks are expensive and also quite big, but HERE is a 20 ton bottle jack I found for only $44. I have no idea about the quality of the jack or about the company selling it, but it gives you an idea of what is available.
__________________
2015 DRV Tradition 375KPS
2015 Chevy Duramax 3500HD LTZ Dually
Full-timers...Home is where we park it.
Check out our blog: Living Our Dream
paz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 07:06 AM   #4
Registered User


 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 3,198
I used a 6 ton bottle jack with the 22k lb F53 coach, I would raise her some on the jacks, then jack up the axle corner I needed with the bottle jack.

I do not think that jack could have lifted the full wieght of the coach.

You could practically walk under the F53 even at normal ride ht.

The new coach is LOW! Especially when you dunp the air. and heavy, at 33k lb. I haven't come up with a solution yet. I'm thinking for normal working under there, to fashion some sort of blocks that would fit between the suspension and frame to hold it up, from normal ride ht jack for clearance, then put the blocks in and lower to them.

For changing tires, I dunno. I got nuttin that will generate 450 lbs of torque anyway.
I need to work on that, I like to do my own stuff.
__________________
JimM68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 09:23 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSGracie View Post
to lift the wheels to change them, then what do you use? I cannot find a bottle jack (very scary as they are not stable unless on level ground and hard seal) that has a higher rating than 3 ton. If I get a trolley jack, it seems that I am carrying a lot of extra weight (and volume) for the few times I might need to use it.
Just curious, why would you want to change a tire when traveling and carry all this stuff?

Jim E
__________________
Pairajays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 09:26 AM   #6
Moderator Emeritus
 
Gary RVRoamer's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Silver Springs, FL. USA
Posts: 18,085
Harbor Freight has bottle jacks to 30 tons and the prices are reasonable. You can get either straight hydraulic or air/hydraulic.
__________________
Gary Brinck
Former owner of 2004 American Tradition
Home is in the Ocala Nat'l Forest near Ocala, FL
Summers in Black Mountain, NC
Gary RVRoamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 09:29 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Senior Chief's Avatar


 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Fleetwood Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somewhere in the woods in Belfair, WA, WA
Posts: 1,250
I would spend the money on a good road service plan, rather than carting around jacks and spares and then rupture myself lifting the tire. JMHO
__________________
Life rocks when your house rolls
Senior Chief
& the Cheese Queen


Senior Chief is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 05:15 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: SoCal
Posts: 127
When putting tire back on just use a bar and leverage, I'm 78 and 155lbs and can do it myself.
Yesterday had 6 new Toyo's installed in Rialto CA. MH is too tall for bays. They used a truck floor jack and then used a jack stand for safety.
I'm retired heavy const. Piledriver
__________________
Piledrive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 07:59 PM   #9
Registered User
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Back in Philly for the fall heading to Sunshine before the snow flies
Posts: 1,485
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piledrive View Post
When putting tire back on just use a bar and leverage, I'm 78 and 155lbs and can do it myself.
Yesterday had 6 new Toyo's installed in Rialto CA. MH is too tall for bays. They used a truck floor jack and then used a jack stand for safety.
I'm retired heavy const. Piledriver
Welcome, at your weight I guess you did a lot of monkey work lol, I'm a carpenter and worked with the dock bulders local a few times, dirty hard work. Glad to see a retiree that's made it to 78 and healthy.
__________________
hondo122 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 08:12 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cartersville, GA
Posts: 133
I've said it a thousand times and I'll say it again. AAA Plus RV. Stop being cheapskates and spend the money. They change your tire, they bring you gas and when needed they will tow your RV 10000 miles (as in unlimited mileage). It's about a $120 a year and you can use it for your dinghy as well. Why do people insist on doing things the hard way. It doesn't prove your smarter, only cheaper.

And I say again... I do NOT, nor have I ever, work for AAA. It's a 'no-brainer'.


But the true travelers are they who leave for leaving’s sake
Saying continuously, without knowing why: ‘Let us go on’.
Paraphrased from Baudelaire’s ‘The Journey’
__________________
Joe and Penny
Mischief and Spanky (Shih Tzus)
2013 Crossroads Z-1 29' Travel Trailer
thelastplace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 09:03 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Anacortes, WA (Stick & Brick)
Posts: 2,623
High-load Jack stands, after you've run the levelling jacks as high as they'll go. Then you need about a 15' long torque wrench to get the lug nuts undone. After that, you'll need a forklift to pick up the wheel and tire. Then you have to reverse the process to get the RV back on its wheels.

Roadside service is a lot cheaper, and doesn't put your middle-aged body at risk (damn-near 70 in my case). Thanks to the PO, I do have a spare wheel, with the OEM Ford-supplied 2001 tire on it, but I couldn't lift it, even before I had lumbar surgery for a herniated disk.

Even without roadside service insurance, I sure wouldn't tackle it myself.

With the utilisation most Rvs have, rotating the tires doesn't do squat. They'll die of old age long before the tread wears out, so whay bother.
__________________
Frank Damp -Anacortes, WA,(DW- Eileen)
ex-pat Brits (1968) and ex-RVers.
frankdamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 10:57 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
GSGracie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Christchurch, NZ
Posts: 313
Send a message via Skype™ to GSGracie
Appreciate the ideas expressed. I am in New Zealand, so AAA isn't a lot of use to me - the callout would take too long and the mileage cost would be prohibitive. Our AA (same as AAA I guess) puts a limit on vehicle callouts of 3.5 ton, so they are not much use to me. I have a spare wheel and although I have only had the coach less than a year, I have already had call to change a tyre. You are right, it is a beggar of a task, but given the alternative of staying put, I am just trying to cover bases.

I used the levelling jacks to raise the wheel, but apparently I shouldn't have, so I am just canvassing for alternatives. My real concern is that a bottle jack has a pretty small footprint, and is not inherently stable, unless on concrete or hard seal.
__________________
Graham Gracie in a 1999 Mirada, V10 Petrol. New Zealand, Suzuki Escudo 2001 2.5L V6. Mini poodle, Pierre and mini schnauzer, Maddie.
GSGracie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 11:43 PM   #13
KIX
Senior Member
 
KIX's Avatar


 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: St. Augustine, FL
Posts: 3,579
GSGracie,
We're in the US and have a Road Service plan in case of a flat but in your case I would not hesitate to use the coach's levelers. I have hydraulic levelers and in the instance of catastrophic failure on the heaviest axle it would probably cause damage to the valance of the coach. But, I would not need to place any part of my body under the coach to remove or remount a tire. In the wheel well, yes but not under the coach. Levelers are designed to support the weight of the "corner" they lift. Just don't put your body under the coach when on levelers.
__________________
KIX
'02 Ultimate Advantage 40J Spartan MM - Cummins ISC
2013 Jeep Rubicon JK Unlimited
KIX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 01:29 AM   #14
Registered User
 
Vintage RV Owners Club
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Then you need about a 15' long torque wrench to get the lug nuts undone. After that, you'll need a forklift to pick up the wheel and tire.
No, no, and no...
__________________

__________________
Midniteoyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Question about levellers begete MH-General Discussions & Problems 1 08-12-2010 01:19 PM
Air Bag / Suspention Storeage GPJourney Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 8 06-07-2009 11:56 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.