Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > MH-General Discussions & Problems
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-06-2008, 01:59 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Middlebury, Indiana
Posts: 13
I'm curious as to how the voltage gets to 120 volts before it comes into the rig when I plug into a 50 amp service at an RV park. I see the MH has a label on it that states it's designed for 240/120 volts. I know that the equipment in the rig is not designed for 240 volts and I'm quite sure we don't plug into 120 volts 50 amps (or do we?). One person told me that the service is 240 volts and 50 amps. If that is true, how does it get to 120 volts before it get into the rig??
__________________

__________________
John

2008 Winnebago Tour TD
EZ Livin is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-06-2008, 01:59 PM   #2
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Middlebury, Indiana
Posts: 13
I'm curious as to how the voltage gets to 120 volts before it comes into the rig when I plug into a 50 amp service at an RV park. I see the MH has a label on it that states it's designed for 240/120 volts. I know that the equipment in the rig is not designed for 240 volts and I'm quite sure we don't plug into 120 volts 50 amps (or do we?). One person told me that the service is 240 volts and 50 amps. If that is true, how does it get to 120 volts before it get into the rig??
__________________

__________________
John

2008 Winnebago Tour TD
EZ Livin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 02:21 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 2
240 volts is made up of 2 seperate 120 volt legs. Because the majority of RV's don't have any 240v items, the manufacturers don't refer to it as 240v.It's just looked at as 2 independent 120v circuits.
__________________
Hank Washburn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 02:58 PM   #4
Community Administrator
 
Route 66's Avatar


 
Newmar Owners Club
Retired Fire Service RVer's
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Newark, DE
Posts: 25,618
Hank is correct.

Hank, welcome to iRV2.

Each 120 volt leg is 50 amps, so in fact we have 100 amps available when using "50 amp" service.

CLICK HERE for more info.
__________________
Adios, Dirk - '84 Real Lite Truck Camper, '86 Wilderness Cimarron TT, previously 4 years as a fulltimer in a '07 DSDP

Route 66 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 03:02 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Middlebury, Indiana
Posts: 13
Hank,

Thanks for quick response. So if I understand correctly, I'm plugging into a 240 volt 50 amp service and when the juice flows into the rig, the 240 volts is split at the bus bar to make it so only 120 volts is available to the equipment. Is this correct??

Thanks again,

John
__________________
John

2008 Winnebago Tour TD
EZ Livin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 03:02 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
AFChap's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: ...hopefully on the road!
Posts: 4,719
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">looked at as 2 independent 120v circuits. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Hank has it right. In the case of our RV's, they are wired to see it as two independent 120v 50a circuits. So actually, the 50a service is providing your RV 100a (50a on each 120v leg). Most RVs use one 120v leg for the front ac and most of the rig, and the other 120v leg for the rear ac and perhaps (I know mine does) the washer/drier.

A newer model electric range in a stick house could use the exact same outlet/circuit, but would use the connection as 240v 50a.

Notice the 50a outlet says on it's face (125v/250v). It is a standard outlet. That is NOT THE CASE with a 120v, 30a RV outlet. The standard 30a outlet in most homes is 240v, 30a on one power leg, while an RV 30a connection must be 120v 30a on one power leg. That is why when you have a 30a plug wired for your RV, you need to have an electrician who TRULY KNOWS what type connection a 30a RV needs.
__________________
Paul (KE5LXU) ...was fulltimin', now parttimin'
'03 Winnebago UA 40e / '05 Honda Odyssey toad
AFChap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 04:28 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
GaryKD's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Wellington, Florida
Posts: 12,324
Hi John,
With regard to "So if I understand correctly, I'm plugging into a 240 volt 50 amp service and when the juice flows into the rig, the 240 volts is split at the bus bar to make it so only 120 volts is available to the equipment. Is this correct??"

If you are talking about the bus bar in the coach the answer is no. At the CG pedestal there are two 120V/50A circuits, each on its' own breaker. If you took a meter and measured from either side to ground, you'd get 120V. Like previously posted, this means you have 100A available for use.

A task for you is to determine which high draw appliances are on which leg. This can be valuable information when running all the appliances at once.

Also, like previously posted, remember when plugged into a 30A outlet, that is the total,,,30A. This is why we must be careful when plugged into a 30A outlet. We have only 30% of the power that is supplied from a 50A outlet.
__________________
Gary
2005 Newmar KSDP 3910 + GMC ENVOY XUV 37K lbs Moving Down The Road
The Avatar Is Many Times Around The USA
Nobody Knows Your Coach Like Somebody Who Owns One Just Like Yours
GaryKD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 05:21 PM   #8
Community Administrator
 
Route 66's Avatar


 
Newmar Owners Club
Retired Fire Service RVer's
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Newark, DE
Posts: 25,618
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">"So if I understand correctly, I'm plugging into a 240 volt 50 amp service and when the juice flows into the rig, the 240 volts is split at the bus bar to make it so only 120 volts is available to the equipment. Is this correct??" </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Gary, I agree with this statement.

There is indeed 240 volts in the breaker box, but there are no 240 volt circuits.

Each circuit uses only one hot leg, which would be 120 volts, but you would have 240 volts across the 2 hot legs.
__________________
Adios, Dirk - '84 Real Lite Truck Camper, '86 Wilderness Cimarron TT, previously 4 years as a fulltimer in a '07 DSDP

Route 66 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 01:39 AM   #9
Community Moderator
 
RV Wizard's Avatar


 
Country Coach Owners Club
Appalachian Campers
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Chattanooga, Tn.
Posts: 12,062
Now that you are getting the picture I will take it one step further. The 50 amp service we have in an RV is the same kind of service you have in a residential home, 120/240 volt 60 Hz single phase. If you open your electrical panel at home you will see breakers that are doubled up by a handle and single circuit breakers that are not. Each double pole breaker is tapped onto L1 and L2(230 volts bus bars underneath). A single breaker is only tapped onto one of the bus bars therefore only providing 120 volts to the circuit.
There are a few MHs and possibly tow ables that use a 240 volt dryer. In this case a double pole 30 amp breaker in the rigs panel would feed a #10/3 with ground conductor cable to a four wire 30 amp receptacle for the dryer only. All other circuits would be single pole breakers; the size of the wire regulates the size amperage breaker is maximum to protect from overheating of the conductor and its insulation.
__________________
Mike, RVIA & RVSA Certified Master RV Technician
Amy, Dr. Assistant - Roxie & Mei Ling, four legs each
2000 Gulf Stream Scenic Cruiser 450 hp & 1330# torque
06 Saturn Vue, 06 Chevy Z71 4x4 & 2014 Corvette Z51 M7
RV Wizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 03:59 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
GaryKD's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Wellington, Florida
Posts: 12,324
Dirk,
Why do you feel we have a different view of this?
__________________
Gary
2005 Newmar KSDP 3910 + GMC ENVOY XUV 37K lbs Moving Down The Road
The Avatar Is Many Times Around The USA
Nobody Knows Your Coach Like Somebody Who Owns One Just Like Yours
GaryKD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 07:34 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
quikduk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 533
O.K. So I am NOT a "sparky" but I can wire electrical items if I have all the "correct" info. so here is the question.

I want to wire a WP exterior outlet for the MH while at home. Can I use a residential 50A 240V outlet and disconnect (similar to what a hot tub uses), mount it on the wall near the RV elec. service door and add that 50A breaker to the panel (providing there is room...and there is)? Will the coach realize that there is now a 50A/240V source but be able to "split" the power as you all have described to two legs within the coach or do I need a different setup?

Ken
__________________
1998 Gulfstream 36' Sun Voyager Bus Platinum
quikduk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 07:51 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
porscheracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Back at the stix'n'brix - East End, AR.
Posts: 553
Yes you can, but make sure you wire it as a 4-wire (I forget the NEMA #) 50A RV circuit. It HAS to have L1 - L2 - N - G, all in the proper places. IF you wire it like a stove receptacle, you'll have problems.

As mentioned, very few RV applications ever use a true 220V circuit, almost all 50A are treated as parallel 110 circuits (which they are).

220 is derived from the 2 separate legs of the low voltage tap from the line transformer. The waveforms are 180 degrees out of phase with each other - which is why you can power a dryer element with 2 wires instead of 3.

Personally, I'd be more than happy to see more 220 applications - dryers especially. 3 hours to wash a small load of clothes is not acceptable, IMHO.
__________________
Norm & Janet

FMCA; WIT; FCOA; Good Sam; Passport
porscheracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 08:18 AM   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
RustyJC's Avatar


 
Texas Boomers Club
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Cypress, Texas USA
Posts: 8,854
One reason we don't see more 220VAC RV applications is that these would only work on 120/240VAC 50 amp service. When a 50 amp rig is plugged into 30 amp service, L1 and L2 are jumpered together in the 30-to-50 dogbone and fed by the single 30 amp hot leg. Therefore, since the L1 and L2 buses are shorted together, any 220 VAC appliances would see 0VAC between L1 and L2.

Rusty
__________________
2016 Ram Longhorn 3500 Dually 4x4 CCLB, 385/900 Cummins, Aisin AS69RC, 4.10
2014.5 DRV Mobile Suites 38RSSA #6972
Come join us on a TEXAS BOOMERS rally!
RustyJC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 08:37 AM   #14
Community Administrator
 
Route 66's Avatar


 
Newmar Owners Club
Retired Fire Service RVer's
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Newark, DE
Posts: 25,618
Gary, I read your post to say that there is not 240 volts in the RV's breaker panel.

The RV's breaker panel is an extension of the power pedestal, there is 240 volts and 120 volts available at both locations.
__________________

__________________
Adios, Dirk - '84 Real Lite Truck Camper, '86 Wilderness Cimarron TT, previously 4 years as a fulltimer in a '07 DSDP

Route 66 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Slide out design sdcgkc Class A Motorhome Discussions 5 10-11-2008 09:04 AM
The Worse Design Ever fleamarketer Vintage RV's 18 09-01-2007 08:38 PM
Design your own RV park Garbageman iRV2.com General Discussion 15 01-07-2007 02:03 PM
New Trailer Design? 8isenuf Travel Trailer Discussion 15 12-19-2006 10:25 AM
Help with design of RV park ozark iRV2.com General Discussion 8 08-11-2006 03:08 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.