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Old 03-24-2014, 09:55 AM   #15
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Take a look at the list of tools. If you have ever purchased any quality tools you know that a couple of hundred dollars add up really quick.

Here is a link to the PDF, Look at the "Detailed Tool List - Tool Bag"

Link here
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Old 03-24-2014, 10:49 AM   #16
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The most valued tool and the one that we use the most is our light weight 1.5 gallon tank air compressor...it's capable of putting out 125 psi. It drives my small air tools, tops off 22.5 tires/toad tires and other people's bicycle tires/inflatable toys. Not one trip without it.
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Old 03-24-2014, 03:02 PM   #17
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I am assuming you are (like most of us) a household fix-it guy and not a true mechanic or you wouldn't be asking this question.

My thinking is you don't need high quality "pro" tools for an emergency or casual repair. Why not just go to Harbor Freight or similar and by prepackaged set. Add what dismissing. For tools you will use seldom, they will be fine.
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Old 03-24-2014, 07:33 PM   #18
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I carry six bread loaf size boxes. One is for screwdrivers, one for metric, one for standard, one for adjustable wrenches and two for electrical & those contain the volt meter, test leight, connectors, wire ties etc. AT home I take them out of the RV and use them at home for whatever project I have going on. I also have one large tool box the has sockets, ratchets, etc. as well as hammer and other items to large for the smaller boxes. I think that is more than I need but if/when I have a problem I'm able to take care of it unless it takes special tools or special knowledge.
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Old 03-24-2014, 10:47 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bug512 View Post
Take a look at the list of tools. If you have ever purchased any quality tools you know that a couple of hundred dollars add up really quick.
A couple hundred dollars yes, not $655. That's way too high for this use. At least half will never be used in an RV. A lot of that list is small parts, bits, sockets, etc. which can be purchased in assorted kits for a lot less. Your not setting up a professional shop. Maybe if you were going to live full time in an RV and not have a house but even then I'd buy exactly what I thought I would need.

Better off buying a basic kit for $50-$100 and adding individual tools you want to carry in the RV. Lowes and Home Depot have good starter kits that would be fine for occasional use in an RV for way less. Another $50 gets you all the little assorted parts boxes of screws, connectors, fuses, tape, etc. you want and you still have $500 left over for additional things (like a compressor).
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Old 03-25-2014, 08:47 AM   #20
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Thanks a Bunch!

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Originally Posted by H. Miller View Post
What do you consider a "little emergency" and how "handy" are you?????
First of all, those are actually great questions! LOL. As for the "little emergency," I am not quite sure because we have only driven our coach about 400 miles from the dealer to home, so I really have no idea what we will be facing on the road. On the way home, however, we had a problem with the door latch that slipped out of place and needed to be tightened down. It required a star tool to tighten it, so we were unable to fix it until we got home because we had no tools. Between the two of us, we are decently handy, but I don't know that I am comfortable rewiring things. My husband is more comfortable with those things than I am.

To give you some idea, as far as home improvements go, we have installed tile, wood floors, patios, irrigation systems, replaced inside and outside lighting, he has some construction experience and some mechanical experience thanks to the military, but I don't know that either of us would be able to fix the big problems like a blown engine or transmission. We have a Harley that we will be towing, and we have had to create temporary fixes for shifting linkage and other problems before. I just wanted to be prepared for anything we are capable of fixing (or temporarily fixing) that may arise with the coach, a sort of emergency arsenal you wouldn't be caught without.

I really do appreciate all of the suggestions from everyone. They have given me --at the very least-- a place to start.
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Old 03-25-2014, 10:09 AM   #21
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You could watch this video made by an rv blogger I know. There are lots of great ideas and tools, you can just pare down to what you need. I think it's a fun video to watch:

Tools and Maintenance Items for the Full Time RV Life - YouTube
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Old 03-25-2014, 10:20 AM   #22
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Not strictly "tools" but I consider them tools because you use them to get something done.

Get all the different electrical adapters made ........ Sometimes referred to as "dog bone" adapters. 50 to 30 amp adapter...... 30 to 15 amp adapter. Any others you find .... Extra electrical cord. And extra fresh water hose.
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Old 03-25-2014, 12:16 PM   #23
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No matter what tools you pack in your MH, when a repair needs to be done, it will require a tool that you DO NOT have! Most always works out that way. Be sure to include both standard and metric tools. Also be sure to have an assortment of screws/bolts and nuts and misc hardware. I have one tool box set up for standard tools and one set up for metric size tools.
Good luck and do not go 'overboard' to start off with. Build slowly.
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Old 03-25-2014, 12:21 PM   #24
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Since you have done all of these 'projects' you appear to be ready to handle most repairs on your MH. As far as engine/transmission work goes most of do not have the space/tools to do this and take our MH's to a shop. Having worked on diesel engine and heavy equipment for years, I do not do the 'heavy' work.
Good luck on your travels and 'be safe'!
Quote:
Originally Posted by pglasl View Post
First of all, those are actually great questions! LOL. As for the "little emergency," I am not quite sure because we have only driven our coach about 400 miles from the dealer to home, so I really have no idea what we will be facing on the road. On the way home, however, we had a problem with the door latch that slipped out of place and needed to be tightened down. It required a star tool to tighten it, so we were unable to fix it until we got home because we had no tools. Between the two of us, we are decently handy, but I don't know that I am comfortable rewiring things. My husband is more comfortable with those things than I am.

To give you some idea, as far as home improvements go, we have installed tile, wood floors, patios, irrigation systems, replaced inside and outside lighting, he has some construction experience and some mechanical experience thanks to the military, but I don't know that either of us would be able to fix the big problems like a blown engine or transmission. We have a Harley that we will be towing, and we have had to create temporary fixes for shifting linkage and other problems before. I just wanted to be prepared for anything we are capable of fixing (or temporarily fixing) that may arise with the coach, a sort of emergency arsenal you wouldn't be caught without.

I really do appreciate all of the suggestions from everyone. They have given me --at the very least-- a place to start.
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Old 03-25-2014, 12:38 PM   #25
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Actually the way this works is with each trip you acquire another tool or repair supply and then you need a bigger carry box and a few more extra screws and bolts and tape and string and wire and while you are doing this your spouse is finding the same situation for the kitchen utensils and then the day comes when you begin opening drawers and basement compartments and stuff falls out and so you weigh your rig and find out you are so overweight it scares you so you go through everything and ditch a bunch of stuff agonizing over if you need it or not and debating endlessly with one another about how this is more important than that and on your next outing sure enough the XYZ you each left out is needed so you bite your tongue not wanting to say "I told you so" to your spouse and the cycle begins again.

Along with your tool collection it is a good thing to asses each year exactly how likely you will need everything and thin out as you build; that way you are somewhat likely to wind up with the essentials.
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Old 03-28-2014, 09:02 PM   #26
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Get a basic set of tools, and add to it as you need it. Most things won't stop you in your tracks and if they do you probably won't want to deal with them without more than you can carry in the motor home. Lowes and Home Depot are all over, I've always managed to make it to a campground and get what I needed.

I would look around the motor home for things that will be hard to find, oddball sized fuses or bulbs, and keep spares for them. I had inverted torx fasteners on my axle U joint caps, only ones on the entire motor home, things that can be a pain to deal with on the road I carry tools for or have replaced with something more standard.
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