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Old 02-16-2009, 06:05 PM   #1
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I have a 2002 Newmar Mountain Aire gas motorhome on a Workhorse W-22. The original tires are the Michelins XRV 235x80x22.5. I need to replace all my tires this year and wonder if anyone has ever changed brands and size of their tires when replacing. The Michelins run about $400/each & I need six of them. Ive had no problem with the Michelins, just pricy.

A local tire dealer suggested a Sumitomo 245x75x22.5 tire. They say its a better tire for about a $100 less than the Michelin. The tire is .4 in wider & .3 taller. The gap between the rear duels is 2. That would bring it down to 1.6 and the extra height would be minimal for the speed odometer.

Has anyone heard of any other tire brand that would work as a replacement?
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Old 02-16-2009, 06:12 PM   #2
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When I had the opportunity, I did not change brands - for the reasons that you are aware of. Perhaps that decreased gap between the rear tires won't cause any problems but I, personally,was unwilling to take that risk.

The original owner got 24K miles and 5 years out of the original tires on the vehicle. They showed checking on the sidewalls so we replaced them with a full set of Michelins within a month of buying the RV. Now, 5 years later, the side wall checking showed up and we are on the 3rd set of Michelins. In all of that time, not a single tire has failed.

I looked at Toyos but decided that if I ever did have tire problems, getting replacements might be difficult. I looked at Goodyears but they had the decreased gap problem on the rears. I'm not sure what I would do if I were forced to go to another tire brand. Since I wasn't forced, I didn't.

I don't know where you are but I shopped the entire Dallas area for the tires that I wanted. I wanted Michelins and a specific DOT code. The price range was significant even among dealers in this area.
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Old 02-17-2009, 07:03 AM   #3
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Looks like you've had great, trouble free service from your Michelin XRV 235x80x22.5s.

IMHO, I would replace them with Michelin XRV 235x80x22.5s.

BTW, wider tires mean less gas mileage. So you may lose in gas mileage what you'd gain in buying a lower priced tire.

-Tom
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Old 02-17-2009, 09:35 AM   #4
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I would have to laugh at a tire salesman who told me his tire I had never heard of is better than the Michelin I am wanting to replace ...I suspect it is "better" because he doesn't sell Michelins, and/or thinks he can sell the Sumitomo to you! It may be a good tire, but who knows??

I replaced the original Michelins (275/80R22.5 LRH) on mine with Continentals. The first two were on the front due to not being able to get the XZA2 Michelins I needed when I had one with a defect. I had time to wait but the Michelin dealer could not find any anywhere. A few months ago when I replaced the rear four, the first place I went (a large truck tire sales and service place) told me "that must be a unique Michelin size because we don't have any that size ...you can put this other size on, it's actually the same." But the next truck tire service place I went to offered several choices and brands in that "unique Michelin size," including the same Continentals I had on the front. Interesting to note that the Continentals are not quite identical in diameter and width to the original Michelins, although they are the "same" size.

As long as you have the dual spacing recommended by the tire mfg, you are good to go. Oh, and BTW, the Continentals I bought were $100 less each than the same sized Michelin, just like the Sumitomo!
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Old 02-17-2009, 10:14 AM   #5
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I took the advice of my tire dealer and put Sumitomo tire on my 36 foot DP. After a zipper blow-out, cracked side walls and poor ride on Michelin tires I wanted something better. I found it in the Sumitomo tire.

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Old 02-17-2009, 11:38 AM   #6
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The dealer I talked to sells Michelins and almost any brand I wanted, but has better luck with Sumitomos.

What I was looking for is somebody that has tried a different size tire on a Workhorse W22. The standard tire is 235x80x22.5 and would like to know if a 245x75x22.5 will work.
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Old 02-17-2009, 01:53 PM   #7
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Go for the Sumitomos, they are a good tire, and the size is so close to the original Michelins as to be no problem. With 1.6 inches of space between ther duals, you will never rub the walls together if that is your concern. As to being .3 taller, that too is of no concern, you will never be able to tell the difference.

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Old 02-17-2009, 06:45 PM   #8
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He makes more $$ on the Sumitomo's.

As Dieselclacker said they will be fine.

IMHO Sumi's are not even comparable to the Mich's.

OK, bring on the heat!!!
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Old 02-18-2009, 05:58 AM   #9
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IMHO, most tire dealers will recommend tires in this order.

1. Tires they have in stock that have the highest profit margin.

2. Tires they have in stock with less of a profit margin.

3. Tires they have to order with a high profit margin.

4. Tires they have to order with less of a profit margin.

5. Tires that you specifically want.

-Tom
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Old 02-20-2009, 06:34 PM   #10
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The comment about wider tires means less fuel mileage is not true. If you look carefully next time you are out on the road, you will find a few semi tractors and trailers with single, wide tires, that replace the duals. The reason, less rolling friction, better fuel mileage. We own a semi-tractor and put about 4000 miles a week on it. We watch the large fleet operators to see what tires they are using. These guys have people sitting around just figuring out which tire or tire combinations make the most sense. It changes as tire manufacturers change tire specifications. But, if you look now, the "big boys", are almost all runnning Micheliens on the steer and Firestone on the drive tires. Now, go make up your own mind...
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Old 02-21-2009, 05:22 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mike Thomas:
The comment about wider tires means less fuel mileage is not true.
I'll state in simpler terms.

The more rubber in contact with the ground the more rolling resistance. The more rolling resistance the less fuel mileage.

Doesn't make any difference how many tires are on the drive axle.

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Old 02-21-2009, 03:22 PM   #12
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The main reason for the wide base tires is the fact the single assembly weighs less, allowing the truckers to carry more paying weight. This started with the liquid haulers. IIRC the savings is around 80 lbs.

The tires are narrower than 2-22.5's so there will be some fuel saving too, along with the fuel savings from a lighter assembly.
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