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Old 09-06-2014, 01:31 PM   #1
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Sidewall Delamination Repair Project

I recently completed a project to repair the delamination of one of the sidewalls on my 2000 Winnebago Journey. I'm guessing the delam probably originated from a cracked shower skylight, which I replaced as soon as I found it. The delamination didn't show up until several years later, and I let it go on for many more years before finally tackling it this summer.

In short, I cut open the sidewall with a circular saw, swabbed epoxy onto the luan plywood and the inner filon/fiberglass surfaces, clamped it back together for three days, and then covered the seam with a plastic trim strip.

I am really satisfied with the outcome (so far). Here's a link to my project writeup - including lots of pictures:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...2RTLWqr9CA/pub
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Old 09-06-2014, 05:30 PM   #2
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What a job, I admire your ingenuity and strength to cut open a side wall. Great write-up, I am sure this will help others.

When applying the epoxy to the side wall, how long was your working time?

Fred
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Old 09-06-2014, 08:41 PM   #3
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Thanks for the feedback.

Working time varies depending on the temperature and which hardener is added to the resin. In my case the temperature was in the mid-50s to low 60s, which supposedly extends the actual working time, but it also slows down the cure time - which is why I left it clamped for three days.

The West 206 is a slow hardener intended to give up to 110 minutes of "working time". This was more than sufficient for me. I think I spent about 45 minutes swabbing the epoxy before I applied the clamps.

I refer you to the West website for more details about working time and cure time: WEST SYSTEM | Hardener Selection Guide
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:04 AM   #4
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Great job. I have an identical Journey. Will keep your post in mind

Jerry
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:41 AM   #5
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Great write-up...

I was surprised the condition of the luan plywood that had delaminated under the top surface. You would think with all of today's technology the manufactures would come up with a exterior material that will not delam. some day...
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Old 09-10-2014, 10:10 AM   #6
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Thank you for the great documentation on how to accomplish this. I've saved it all into a file that I hope I never have to use.

I would have never thought to add a vertical seam cover but it is the key to doing this so that it will last.

Thanks again.

Fred
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Old 09-10-2014, 03:55 PM   #7
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OP, well done. That is very practical solution to a problem that one could spend fortunes on with perhaps only similar results. I hope it stands the test of time!

Chris
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Old 10-20-2014, 08:44 PM   #8
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Neat write up, thanks for sharing!

If you don't mind my asking, since you utilized arguably the best epoxy system known to mankind and seemed to have a decent clamping solution......why not fill the saw cut with epoxy, maybe a thin ribbon of fiberglass tape for added re-enforcement then either try to color match it yourself or have a pro give it a go?
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Old 10-21-2014, 10:12 AM   #9
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My motorhome is 14 years old and the gel-coating on the sidewalls has yellowed and dulled to a considerable extent. Rather than fill the saw-cut gap with epoxy and try to achieve a seamless finish - considering the yellowing and fading, and my lack of experience with these materials - I decided to go with the trim strip.
It's one thing to apply epoxy behind the fiberglass where it will never be seen, but quite another to try to use it as part of the finish.
Fact is, I was not even going to do this project until I saw another motorhome with a similar trim strip and realized it would be the simplest solution.
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Old 10-22-2014, 08:18 PM   #10
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All valid points, thanks again for sharing.
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Old 10-23-2014, 10:22 PM   #11
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Great job. Awesome write up. Thanks
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:51 PM   #12
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Excellent write-up. I have a couple fo delay bubble below a window that I have to get to this this winter. Your instructions will be very helpful for the process. Thanks!!
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Old 03-16-2016, 03:59 PM   #13
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very impressed

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guanaco View Post
I recently completed a project to repair the delamination of one of the sidewalls on my 2000 Winnebago Journey. I'm guessing the delam probably originated from a cracked shower skylight, which I replaced as soon as I found it. The delamination didn't show up until several years later, and I let it go on for many more years before finally tackling it this summer.

In short, I cut open the sidewall with a circular saw, swabbed epoxy onto the luan plywood and the inner filon/fiberglass surfaces, clamped it back together for three days, and then covered the seam with a plastic trim strip.

I am really satisfied with the outcome (so far). Here's a link to my project writeup - including lots of pictures:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...2RTLWqr9CA/pub
This has to be one of the best thought out pieces of ingenuity I've seen for this issue. Not to mention how much $$ you saved!!

congrats and well done
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Old 03-20-2016, 08:12 AM   #14
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Great work !
Thanks for sharing your interesting project very cool!
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