Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > MH-General Discussions & Problems
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-04-2016, 06:41 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Ray,IN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: North America somewhere
Posts: 13,686


Nitrogen is a gas, subject to Boyle's law, exactly the same as all other ideal gas's. It will expand at the same rate as any other gas.
What makes a different expansion rate is moisture content, nothing else.
Per the Michelen website, adding beads or some other solid product inside their tires may void the warranty.
__________________

__________________
2000 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom USQ40JD, ISC 8.3 Cummins 350, Spartan MM Chassis. USA 1SG, retired;PPA,Good Sam Life member,FMCA."We the people are the rightful masters of both the Congress and the Courts - not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow men who pervert the Constitution. "Abraham Lincoln"
Ray,IN is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-04-2016, 07:02 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
TonyMac's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Layton, Utah
Posts: 992
I use beads to keep my tires balanced, not to extend their life, but because of the whiney noise from the copliot seat that comes along with the rough ride. Nitrogen is used in aircraft tires because it's nitrogen, an inert gas that has nothing else in there, like water or oxygen and frog farts. It is also a bigger molecule, and less suceptable to slow leakage, especially important when you take your 150 psi aircraft tires to 45,000 feet where the air pressure is about 1/7th of sea level. Since I'm not taking my dp to FL450, I feel safe with compressed and hopefully dry air. It's cold up there, but the view is nice, and one beer will mess you up!
__________________

__________________
Cheers,
TonyMac
2006 Monaco Safari Cheetah 40PMT
TonyMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 07:13 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
jerichorick's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Full-timer/volunteer w/SOWERS
Posts: 3,394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray,IN View Post


Nitrogen is a gas, subject to Boyle's law, exactly the same as all other ideal gas's. It will expand at the same rate as any other gas.
What makes a different expansion rate is moisture content, nothing else.
Per the Michelen website, adding beads or some other solid product inside their tires may void the warranty.
Thank you for this wise input. I have installed a filter/water separator system on my pancake 150 psi compressor. I want dry air in my tires. Many of the pro shops don't have dryers on their air systems. I have asked when I have had tires installed. Going with nitrogen is also very expensive and you need to carry a cylinder along for the occasional top-off or pay big bucks from a shop with the stuff.

This is true for some of the tire manufactures. Any foreign material inside the tire may void the warranty. If you do go with balancing beads in the tire you need to install specially designed valve stems.

When using a TPMS you can see the psi increase as the ambient temperature rises. On my last trip I had to release 5 psi from each tire to keep the alarm from triggering. My tires are cold set at 110 all around. The alarm high limit is set 135 psi if I recall correctly.

The max cold psi for my tires is 110. Even with the engineered running tolerance, I don't feel comfortable running these tires with that much pressure. I will be replacing them by the end of this year when I have the money. I am leaning heavily toward the Toyo M154 120psi tire. I hope to find a shop that has an air dryer on their hose.

Happy trails,

Rick Y
__________________
Rick & Melissa Young & Dawson, 2011 Itasca Meridian 40U, Freightliner XCL, Cummins ISL 380HP/DEF, Allison 3000 MH, 2014 Honda CR-V, SMI AF1, Blue Ox tow equip., TST 507 TPMS, TruCenter steering control, Hughes auto transformer.
Servants On Wheels Ever Ready. Best job we ever paid to do . (full time volunteers)
jerichorick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2016, 10:08 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Ray,IN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: North America somewhere
Posts: 13,686
jerichorick, Before you owned a tire pressure monitor you probably never gave a thought to running tires at maximum inflation, why do it now?
Now that you've brought the subject up, your rims have a maximum air pressure rating which is probably the same as your tires; you aren't going to buy new rims too are you?
Perhaps you are over-thinking that aspect.
__________________
2000 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom USQ40JD, ISC 8.3 Cummins 350, Spartan MM Chassis. USA 1SG, retired;PPA,Good Sam Life member,FMCA."We the people are the rightful masters of both the Congress and the Courts - not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow men who pervert the Constitution. "Abraham Lincoln"
Ray,IN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2016, 01:13 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
jerichorick's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Full-timer/volunteer w/SOWERS
Posts: 3,394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray,IN View Post
jerichorick, Before you owned a tire pressure monitor you probably never gave a thought to running tires at maximum inflation, why do it now?
Now that you've brought the subject up, your rims have a maximum air pressure rating which is probably the same as your tires; you aren't going to buy new rims too are you?
Perhaps you are over-thinking that aspect.
Ray, you just made a bad assumption about me. I won't take it personal.

My "Door Sticker" has the 110 cold psi spec from the factory. My rims are 120 cold psi. My Michelin's are the XZE2 model which is rated at 110 cold psi max. That means that these tires hare running at max load spec from the factory.

I had a blow out on my last rig. I don't want to have another. I have replaced the front tires with Continental's. I don't have the model handy but they are specked at 120 cold psi and I am running them at 110 cold psi. I will be replacing the rear 4 XZE2 tires with Toyo M154 120 cold psi rated tires later this year.

The TPMS is only a early warning system. That is it in a nut shell. If one tire starts to get much hotter than the others or the psi is way out of line I know I have to stop and investigate.

I am trying to keep dried air in my tires to keep the effect of ambient temperature and rolling temperature affects to a reasonable limit. Most manufacture sites I have read give an increase of 1.5 to to psi per 10* increase in temperature. I have found it to be much greater with the evidence coming from the TPMS. Without it I would have never know my tires were gaining as much psi, in actual use, as they are.

Happy and safe trails,

Rick
__________________
Rick & Melissa Young & Dawson, 2011 Itasca Meridian 40U, Freightliner XCL, Cummins ISL 380HP/DEF, Allison 3000 MH, 2014 Honda CR-V, SMI AF1, Blue Ox tow equip., TST 507 TPMS, TruCenter steering control, Hughes auto transformer.
Servants On Wheels Ever Ready. Best job we ever paid to do . (full time volunteers)
jerichorick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2016, 09:23 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
RVNeophytes2's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 931
Blog Entries: 1
Great Idea for Airlines, Come Fly with Us

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray,IN View Post
jerichorick, Before you owned a tire pressure monitor you probably never gave a thought to running tires at maximum inflation, why do it now?
Now that you've brought the subject up, your rims have a maximum air pressure rating which is probably the same as your tires; you aren't going to buy new rims too are you?
Perhaps you are over-thinking that aspect.
'Got me to thinking: we used to fly before that pesky Traffic Collision
Avoidance System; I think I'll start disabling it. Same thing with Assymetrical Thrust Compensation; I mean, John Wayne pushed his own rudder, right? And, radar. Jeesh... if you can't find your way by looking out the windshield, what kind of airline pilot are you?!

Now, I'm looking for volunteers to try out my "legacy flying" concept in some really nasty weather and crowded skies. Are your wife and grandkids doing anything next week, Ray?

The moral: NEVER beat up on someone utilizing the latest in safety technology and knowledge.

jerichorick, you're right on the money. You clearly understand the notion of contact patch. The engineers at your tire manufacturer have the precise pressure for your axle-end weight to optimize performance. They are published online for your exact model of tire.

BTW, it's been about one year since I talked to the daughter of a couple killed after a steer-tire blew. Momma was hurled through the windshield, bystanders had to extinguish her prior to (vainly) rendering aid. Before that, a fellow 777 driver blew one in his Foretravel, and he said it was worse than any aircraft engine failure. See? You're on track to be a great airline captain, if you want an encore career
__________________
RVNeophytes2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2016, 09:38 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,385
Since it was mentioned above:

The pressure on the sidewall of a Michelin RV tire and many others is not the "Maximum" the tire should ever have (unlike car tires) it is the minimum to support the maximum rated carrying capacity of the tire.

From the Michelin RV Tire Guide:
Quote:
"If you look at the tire's sidewall, you'll see the maximum load capacity allowed for the size tire and load rating, and the minimum cold air inflation needed to carry the maximum load."
From page 6 of the GoodYear RV Tire and Care Guide:
Quote:
"How much air is enough?
The proper air inflation for your tires depends on how much your fully loaded RV or trailer weighs. Look at the sidewall of your RV tire and you’ll see the maximum load capacity for the tire size and load rating, as well as the minimum cold air inflation, needed to carry that maximum load."
From TOYO:
Quote:
Q: What are the consequences of inflating the tires to accommodate the actual loads?
A: If the inflation pressure corresponds to the actual tire load according to the tire manufacturer’s load and pressure table, the tire will be running at 100% of its rated load at that pressure. This practice may not provide sufficient safety margin. Any air pressure loss below the minimum required to carry the load can result in eventual tire failure.
But then they go ahead and publish a weight/pressure chart allowing lower pressure for RV's!!

From the August 2010 Motorhome Magazine "Tread Carefully" tire article:
Quote:
The maximum load capacity allowed for the size tire and load rating and the minimum cold air inflation needed to carry that maximum load are located on the tire’s sidewall.
Also, NEVER let pressure out of a tire just because you THINK they are overinflated! the tires are designed to take the pressure build up from running.
__________________

__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.