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Old 09-19-2012, 06:53 AM   #29
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If you are at a campground with full hookup, leaving the faucets running at a slow rate will assure no freezing will happen -- as long as you have the slinky hooked up and the grey tank valve open.
Just be sure the faucet you are running is not draining into the black tank as many bath drains are. We talked to a volunteer at a SC State CG that told us one particularly cold night a couple of campers overflowed their black tank doing this. Yuck! I guess the black tank valve could remain open but that is another topic.
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:19 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Tony Lee View Post

We had to sit for a night in a carpark in snow near Stuttgart in our Hobby which is as close as you can get to winter rated. It wasn't all that cold - about 8C below zero - but a full grey tank (100L) exposed to the weather froze solid. That was expected, but I didn't expect to lose fresh water because it was all inside and heated. Turned out a 2' length of the pump suction line ran past the fibreglass wheel arch, pressed hard up against the uninsulated sheet. It froze, and there was no way to get it unfrozen in the cold weather so I had to dismantle part of the kitchen cupboard to reroute the pipe and add insulation to the wheel arch.
Pipes might be slow(ish) to freeze, but once they are frozen, they can stay frozen for a very long time.
I guess this is my concern as I could be overnighting in a truck stop where the overnight temp could easily be 25F with a good wind. Since I could add a trouble light near my water tank & pump, BUT there are too many areas where my water lines pass along the outside walls or areas where very little or no insulations exists.

Part of me says that I may as well "rough it" for one week but I can still have a 5 gallon of fresh water jug inside for general use.

I now realize that I don't need the stress of worrying about frozen pipes, may as well just concentrate on keeping the generator, furnace, propane, and batteries going.

I figure I can empty the grey and black tanks and just add a 1/2 gallon of Pink down there to keep it from freezing.

The 100w trouble light idea sounds good, but I have overnighted in 20-25F weather, and it is amazing how quickly a RV can get cold. There is just too many areas that I would have to insulate or have too many trouble lights hanging in unaccessible areas.

Since I will be traveling south slowly for 1 week in a cold climate, I figure I can shower a few times in trucks stops or a campground. Once in a warmer climate flush the pink out.
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:21 AM   #31
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Just be sure the faucet you are running is not draining into the black tank as many bath drains are. We talked to a volunteer at a SC State CG that told us one particularly cold night a couple of campers overflowed their black tank doing this. Yuck! I guess the black tank valve could remain open but that is another topic.
I hear ya, as I learned my lesson about this. My sink near the toilet and shower empties into the black tank. Don't ask me how I know :(

I thought that all "grey water" would empty in the grey tank, but I guess MFG's use whatever tank is nearby...
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Old 09-19-2012, 10:19 AM   #32
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I hear ya, as I learned my lesson about this. My sink near the toilet and shower empties into the black tank. Don't ask me how I know :(

I thought that all "grey water" would empty in the grey tank, but I guess MFG's use whatever tank is nearby...
Many MFG's put the bathroom sink into the black tank to extend the use of the grey tank AND to assure that the black tank gets the water needed to make it function (and drain) properly. The toilets are designed to use as little water as possible, thus creating the potential for the 'pyramid of poo' that is difficult to get rid of!

In your post #30 I think you are doing the best thing. When I bought my RV in Wyoming, in February, I had to drive it back home to Ohio in snow and temps in the 20's. It does have 'heated tanks' but I was traveling empty except for water jugs I carried inside. I just wasn't willing to test the winterizing on my first trip!
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Old 09-20-2012, 08:47 AM   #33
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The RV is in Canada now and will be until the end of Oct, so I am sure that I will just end up winterizing the system and "rough it" for the first week of my 2 weeks traveling south.

I'm on the houseboat till the end of Oct and the RV is waiting for the winter trip south. So when the night time temps start to drop here I'll pump some pink into it and get it ready to travel.

This way I can concentrate on the trip instead of the overnight temps...

Thanks for everyones thoughts and opinions... IAN...
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Old 09-22-2012, 11:02 AM   #34
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I think the one thing you're forgetting in all of this is every motor home is insulated to some extent the plumbing is always on the inside of the insulation so any bit of heat in the motorhome will keep the pipes much warmer than the outside temperatures I know in my case I have overnighted in temperatures as low as 20F with no issue at all.
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Old 09-22-2012, 11:54 AM   #35
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These threads should cover all your needs.
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Old 09-22-2012, 12:45 PM   #36
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Best thing to do for winterizing is to drain all of the lines, then blow then with air until all are clear. Add RV antifreeze to the P traps at the sinks and tub/shower.

Do not use rubbing alcohol. Also 1 part in 30 will do little to suppress the freeze point.

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Old 09-22-2012, 02:24 PM   #37
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I think the one thing you're forgetting in all of this is every motor home is insulated to some extent the plumbing is always on the inside of the insulation so any bit of heat in the motorhome will keep the pipes much warmer than the outside temperatures I know in my case I have overnighted in temperatures as low as 20F with no issue at all.
Murf2u, I wish I could agree with you about every RV being insulated, however in mine, the grey water lines pass along the rear fiberglass cap just above the bumper and there is no insulation anywhere back there. The fiberglass rear cap is @ 1/16" to 1/8" thick.

On top of that, if a pipe or fitting were to freeze and split it's usually in a in accessible area, and what a nightmare it would be to repair. And all of this because the grey water lines pass hidden behind the lower portion of the shower.

My 23ft RV is not a "winter package" and since I will be spending a week in early November in Quebec, Ontario, NY, PA, VA... and not connected to a campground but overnighting is truck stops, Walmarts etc.... and if it gets down to 20-25F at night with a wind blowing, how am I supposed to heat that area, or keep the lines from freezing.

So my question is? If its 25F outside, what would the temp be on the other side of a 1/16" fiberglass rear cap with no insulation but just the thin layer of fiberglass?

I would be emptying my grey and black tank, and I would be adding a few quarts of Pink in those, and I would be adding Pink as needed to keep my tanks from freezing.

I would likely be running my propane hot water tank for 30 mins in the morning and evening to keep that warm.

I had a look at the weather history for Ontario, Quebec, and NY, and the average nighttime temp is 30-32F, so it could be easily 37 or 27F.

My luck, I would winterize and the nighttime temps would be 38-40F...

I know I could put a small heater or trouble light in the wet bay area, but that area is easy to keep warm. I know that I could keep my furnace running at 70F all night and keep my cabinet doors open to help, but it is those inaccessible areas that would get no heat and those are the areas that I am worried about.

I'm taking 2 weeks to travel from Quebec to Florida and I presume I will be in the northern cold area for @ 1 week. I will be in SC or NC in the 2nd week.

I'm 50-50 on wether to winterize or have the water system running.... Part of me says to just winterize and concentrate my efforts on making sure that I have good battery power, propane, and a good furnace.

PS: maybe I am just being "anal"... lollll

Either way, Florida here I come for 5 months.....

Thanks for everyones help and understanding...
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Old 09-23-2012, 09:41 AM   #38
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All you tank drain lines if your tanks are empty will not have water in them to be worried about.
The area over the bumper is it behind the fresh water tank under the bed?
Isn't it possible to force some insulation down behind that area.
Your water lines will have the pink stuff in them until you get to warmer temps.
Running the water heater is OK just run long enough the heater box should be insulated.
If your furnace is on while traveling the traps in kitchen and bath should be OK because of heater hoses running through your cabinets.
You can use water because the holding tanks will not get so full to freeze with the pink stuff in them down to the tank sewer drains.
You can flush the toilet with the pink stuff and do leave some in toilet bowl to keep seal from drying out.
If you have your furnace on at comfortable setting you should have a good trip.
A couple days travel is all it takes to get to the warmer temps.
We were in Indiana at 0* temps for four days and had no problems with the furnace on.
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