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Old 01-22-2015, 07:43 AM   #1
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Using RV while doing Equal. charge

I've read in other threads that some people believe that the 15 plus volts can damage the electronics in the RV. Could there be other reasons for not using the batteries during equilization? I just don't believe that the higher voltage is going to hurt anything.
With temperature compensation our electronics already get 15 plus volts during really cold weather. Ex. T-105's daily charge at 30 degrees would be about 15.5 volts.
Anyway, while do an equalization do you worry about using the RV or not?
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:51 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by okcnewbie View Post
I've read in other threads that some people believe that the 15 plus volts can damage the electronics in the RV. Could there be other reasons for not using the batteries during equilization? I just don't believe that the higher voltage is going to hurt anything.
With temperature compensation our electronics already get 15 plus volts during really cold weather. Ex. T-105's daily charge at 30 degrees would be about 15.5 volts.
Anyway, while do an equalization do you worry about using the RV or not?
Lots of people will cry "the sky is falling, the sky is falling", as for me, my Onan EC-30 Power Management System does an equilizaton every 10 charges and in 5 years with this motorhome, I haven't lost a single 12 volt item (well, couple of light bulbs). I am just relating my experience, not spouting off theory or opinion.
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Old 01-22-2015, 10:05 AM   #3
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Ben using mine since 2011 with no problems .
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Old 01-23-2015, 08:52 AM   #4
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I trip the house battery disconnect when doing my annual equalize cycle to disconnect 12v loads as advised by the Freedom manual. (No, that does not disconnect the battery from the charger.) I continue to use the mh, but don't have heat, refrigerator, 12v lights, etc.
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Old 01-23-2015, 07:17 PM   #5
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I'm not gonna risk ignoring what my Xantrex manual states.
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Old 01-24-2015, 09:55 AM   #6
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I'm not gonna risk ignoring what my Xantrex manual states.
And it says?
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Old 01-24-2015, 10:14 AM   #7
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Volts push the electrical current (amps) through your conducting wires to you appliances. Obviously, 120-volt power pushes with much more force than 12-volt power.

So, your question, from my point of view, is how much electricity can you push through your 12 V system with more than 12 volts before you have problems? Since you are experimenting, when you hit the limit, you will know, since it is not an absolutely fixed number...an rvs can be irritatingly different. How soon you will know, that is another question as damage sometimes takes time to hit failure point.

They tell electricians it is not the volts that kill you, it is the amps the voltage is pushing through your system that does the damage. The left arm is a conductor to your heart appliance and down through your left foot for a good ground.

By the way GFCIs turn off the power to your arm to minimize damage as with AC our body reacts the opposite that we need to...we stay hooked up and sizzle like toast...takes time to destroy things.

Obviously, when you exceed the limits, the system starts self-destructing sometimes slow and sometimes very fast, which is why there are reasons for things like stated limits, fuses, reserve factors, etc. to help you avoid damage. The less you understand, the easier it is to create some damage.

As to why people like to experiment with an expensive rv, that is always interesting. After all, it is ours, so we can do what we like. I think if one is trying to enjoy the rv, one tends to try to avoid breakdowns.

Just like exceeding the stated weight limits. Only the insurance co and police will care about that...and of course as some say they will be unreasonable.

I would never tell you to proceed unconcerned, though that is one recommendation that can be provided.
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Old 01-24-2015, 11:16 AM   #8
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U was under the impression that properly maintained batteries don't need to be "boiled".

Not familiar with the inverter you are using but with PSW Magnum 2000 Equalize is not an automatic process or a recommended maintenance procedure. Keep em clean - filled - connections checked and properly torqued and allow the inverter to run its course - bulk - absorb - float - saver modes and all should remain right in the world.

When not in use for short periods - full disconnect of batteries - monthly run of generator and inverter should maintain them. Longer cold periods pull them and put on a good charger.

Could be a difference in inverters or philosophy. 2.5 years on these batteries using little water and no problems so far. Longer history with lesser inverter and same behavior with previous unit.
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Old 01-24-2015, 11:32 AM   #9
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FYI Just some more information about battery charging.

All charging circuits will charge at a higher voltage rate that the actual working voltage of a battery. This is necessary because the voltage is pushing electrons back into the battery. If the voltage is at or below the 12.6 V then the battery won't charge. It is usually 1-VOLT higher than the OP voltage of 12.6-V. The standard open post voltage is 12.6 volts. On a standard charge (one that might follow cranking your engine) the starting charging rate is will be about 13.6-V. If it's cold outside then it will be a little higher. Cold temps increase the resistance to re-charging. If the battery is somewhat low in charge then it might even be higher like above 14-V. Eventually the charging rate will drop as the battery slowly becomes charged.

I have saved many a battery that was thought to be dead by using a slow (1-2AMPS) charge over 24-48 hours. Remember re-charging a battery is done at the molecular level. It should be done slowly when possible.

TeJay
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Old 01-24-2015, 11:53 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by okcnewbie View Post
I've read in other threads that some people believe that the 15 plus volts can damage the electronics in the RV. Could there be other reasons for not using the batteries during equilization? I just don't believe that the higher voltage is going to hurt anything.
With temperature compensation our electronics already get 15 plus volts during really cold weather. Ex. T-105's daily charge at 30 degrees would be about 15.5 volts.
Anyway, while do an equalization do you worry about using the RV or not?
okcnewbie
I have had 2 sets of 12V "deep cycle marine" house batteries last 9 years in my coach without ever being "equalized".
However, if I ever did equalize my batteries I would make sure that nothing using battery voltage saw the equalization voltage.

But it's your RV do what you think is best.

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Old 01-24-2015, 02:50 PM   #11
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Here are the steps a 3 stage charger goes thru,


Bulk Charge - The first stage of 3-stage battery charging. Current is sent to batteries at the maximum safe rate they will accept until voltage rises to near (80-90%) full charge level. Voltages at this stage typically range from 10.5 volts to 15 volts. There is no "correct" voltage for bulk charging, but there may be limits on the maximum current that the battery and/or wiring can take.
Absorption Charge: The 2nd stage of 3-stage battery charging. Voltage remains constant and current gradually tapers off as internal resistance increases during charging. It is during this stage that the charger puts out maximum voltage. Voltages at this stage are typically around 14.2 to 15.5 volts.
Float Charge: The 3rd stage of 3-stage battery charging. After batteries reach full charge, charging voltage is reduced to a lower level (typically 12.8 to 13.2) to reduce gassing and prolong battery life. This is often referred to as a maintenance or trickle charge, since it's main purpose is to keep an already charged battery from discharging. PWM, or "pulse width modulation" accomplishes the same thing. In PWM, the controller or charger senses tiny voltage drops in the battery and sends very short charging cycles (pulses) to the battery. This may occur several hundred times per minute. It is called "pulse width" because the width of the pulses may vary from a few microseconds to several seconds. Note that for long term float service, such as backup power systems that are seldom discharged, the float voltage should be around 13.02 to 13.20 volts.
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Old 01-24-2015, 07:18 PM   #12
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And it says?
It says to disconnect the batteries from the coach while equalizing. I can't equalize mine though, the manual also says not to equalize sealed lead-acid batteries, and my starting batteries are sealed Interstates.
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Old 01-24-2015, 07:23 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by TeJay View Post
FYI Just some more information about battery charging.

All charging circuits will charge at a higher voltage rate that the actual working voltage of a battery. This is necessary because the voltage is pushing electrons back into the battery. If the voltage is at or below the 12.6 V then the battery won't charge. Your batteries must be different. I once left a light burning on my farm tractor. When I returned to the tractor the battery was totally dead, not a flicker from a light. I put it on a charger and 4 hrs. later started the tractor and mowed the rest of the day. That battery had to be replaced 3 years later.

It is usually 1-VOLT higher than the OP voltage of 12.6-V. The standard open post voltage is 12.6 volts. On a standard charge (one that might follow cranking your engine) the starting charging rate is will be about 13.6-V. If it's cold outside then it will be a little higher. Cold temps increase the resistance to re-charging. If the battery is somewhat low in charge then it might even be higher like above 14-V. Eventually the charging rate will drop as the battery slowly becomes charged.

I have saved many a battery that was thought to be dead by using a slow (1-2AMPS) charge over 24-48 hours. Remember re-charging a battery is done at the molecular level. It should be done slowly when possible.

TeJay
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Old 01-24-2015, 07:32 PM   #14
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Ray,IN,

He was talking about the output voltage of the charger, it has to be higher then the batt. volts.
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