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Old 09-27-2011, 10:36 AM   #1
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Valve extenders..are there differences?

I see valve extenders for $20 per set and $150 a set. Are there real differences? I'm considering putting on a TPMS and want valve extenders that will work well with the sensors. Thanks!
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Old 09-27-2011, 10:44 AM   #2
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Valve extenders $20 are just that. The $150 valve extenders are probably actual replacement valves that require unmounting the tire. Check your present valves to make sure that they metal, not rubber, before you consider extenders. Personally I would not use the extenders. Just another opportunity for a leak. Many TPMS offer a tool, usually for added cost, to install and uninstall the sensors.
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Old 09-27-2011, 11:10 AM   #3
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There are valve extenders and then there are real valve extenders. Check out the differences at your local RV supply. Shop around

You don't want a cheap solution then pay for it on the road with a flat or blown valve extender.

http://www.campingworld.com/search/i...y&Nty=1&Ntpc=1
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Old 09-27-2011, 11:56 AM   #4
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I have seen 2 different types of extenders.

One type is more or less just a long valve stem that screws on the short stem on the tire. This type holds the tire air inside the extension and holds the tire's valve stem open all the time.

Second type is an air tube with a schrader valve that extends all the way to the valve stem on the tire. This type does NOT hold air inside when not in use. The tire's valve stem holds the air in the tire.

Yes there is a cost difference.

Extenders are handy, but not a "must have". With a typical air chuck at any truck stop, you can reach and fill both tires on your duals.
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Old 09-27-2011, 01:04 PM   #5
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I carry a 110 volt mini compressor with the air chuck I need to access, all the tires, with out the use of extensions. Running the gen set ,if necessary, to fill the tires cold, preferable, to manuvering around a truck stop, when the tires have built up heat. Cheaper than the $150 extensions too.
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Old 09-27-2011, 02:08 PM   #6
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Do yourself a favor and replace your valve stems on your dually's with dually valve stems. They make it a lot easier to check/add air to the inside dually's and do not have the problems with leaking like valve extensions.

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Old 09-27-2011, 02:39 PM   #7
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If you are going to use TPMS be sure the end of the extender has the schrader valve. Some of the cheaper straight extensions have what looks like a convex/rounded tip. TPMS will not work with this type.

I have the flex hose extensions that come from the valve to a mounting bracket on my hubs. I used the blue lock-tite on the extensions. Do not use lock-tite on the TPMS sensors. Also do not allow the lock-tite to contact the rubber o-ring in your extensions. Apply the lock-tite to the tire valve closer to the base rather than the end to avoid contact with rubber o-rings in the extension.

Never had a leak from an extension.

Try Six Robblees for quality extensions if you need them. TPMS requires metal extensions, rubber allows them to bounce around. Six Robblees
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:12 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by jfran304 View Post
Do yourself a favor and replace your valve stems on your dually's with dually valve stems. They make it a lot easier to check/add air to the inside dually's and do not have the problems with leaking like valve extensions.

Dually Valve - Main Frameset
I had them installed last year when I replaced the tires. If I had known how easy it would be to check and add air I would have got them years ago.
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:30 AM   #9
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Just installed Dually Valves on my bus. Man Oh Man, just like going from an outhouse to indoor plumbing!

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Old 09-28-2011, 12:56 PM   #10
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I guess that having the high-priced ones installed on your wheels make it less easy to rotate the tires doesn't it? You would have to keep the rear duallies on the rear and rotate them left to right and vice-versa. Does that work OK?
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Old 09-28-2011, 02:42 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Full.Monte View Post
I guess that having the high-priced ones installed on your wheels make it less easy to rotate the tires doesn't it? You would have to keep the rear duallies on the rear and rotate them left to right and vice-versa. Does that work OK?
I don't think too many people rotate the tires on their RV's.

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Old 09-28-2011, 04:47 PM   #12
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Rotating tires has one major drawback - they're all worn out at the same time!

On our old Class C, getting to the inside duallies was a real PITA, so I added extenders. Not being too bright, I got the cheap rubber ones which leaked almost all the time. I replaced them with braided Stainless Steel and they were fine. Back then, I think the rubber ones were about $15 a pair and the CRES set was about $40.

When it was time to winterise our current rig for the first time, I got a small 150 psi air compressor. I've found, with the increased clearance under the F53 chassis, I can get to the inner duallies just fine at home on a guzunda (UK for creeper), and top off the pressures with the compressor.
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:20 AM   #13
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I can think of several differences.

First Valve extenders are made for different jobs.. The 20 dollar set is likely for Small Truck tires (Pick up) with pressures of 60 PSI or less... the 120 ones for big trucks and motor homes where 100 PSI or more is not uncommon.. If you are trying to inflate the tire and the extender goes BANG.. not much use is it?

Some are hose inside a metal braid, some rigid, some are pressurized, some are not (that is they depress the pin in the tire's regular valve stem only when their pin is pushed) and other quality and performance issues.

When I get around to it.. i'm going with the good ones.
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Old 09-29-2011, 09:28 PM   #14
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When using a TPMS, it really doesn't matter if the valve is in the extender or the tire valve itself. The pressure sensor is going to keep it permanently bypassed. The important thing is that the sensor can release the valve and the seal doesn't leak.
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