Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > MH-General Discussions & Problems
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-10-2012, 05:06 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Dan DeBruin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 268
I remember one of the first times out with the new to us class A. Were at Sampson State Park in Upstate NY. Beautiful fall dog show, did not have a camp site. Parked in the grass. Seemed solid, dry, not problem. Three days later, time to go home on Sunday evening. Push "store" button that always worked before. Front two jacks would not store. During the weekend, they had settled to about 6-8 inches below the surface and wanted to stay there. I spent a few hours digging around the pads, then using a long board to get them started. Was brand new with my MH and lucky to get them out with nothing more than damaged pride. Next weekend I made my pads and always use them except on concrete pads.
__________________

__________________
Dan and Kathryn DeBruin plus dogs
2005 Newmar Dutchstar 4009
Victor NY
Dan DeBruin is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-10-2012, 11:19 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Luckiest Dreamer's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,188
I screwed and glued three 18" square 3/4" green treated plywood squares and made 4 pads. They work well when we are on grass. I also will use them on occasion when one side of the coach needs to be at a different level than the other and will drive on them. I will also stack them to extend the need for the jack to level beyond it's normal travel. Having them available as well as a dozen 12" long pieces of 2x8" will usually handle any situation I find myself in.
__________________

__________________
Larry B, Luckiest Dreamer
Luckiest Dreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2012, 02:03 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
wa8yxm's Avatar
 
Damon Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 22,829
I use jack pads if the ground is soft or if there is a danger of the ground freezing while the pads are down.. (Ground may be dirt, gravel, cement, asphalt other surface)

Why if there is danger of freezing... I've had a jack pad stick to frozen dirt,, Major pain in the operating system to get it up. (Success was mine, so are some fairly heavy convincers). Witih the pad the moisture and the jack do not meet and thus the jack comes up.

Pull off and a gentle tap with the 8 pounder and the pad pops off the frozen dirt easily.
__________________
Home is where I park it!
wa8yxm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 06:46 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Max Hubrich's Avatar


 
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Pikeville, NC
Posts: 1,724
IMHO-
You should always have an insulating buffer between the ground and your jacks-period! This is the route any lightening strike will take, and in the process you can have serious damage without an insulated RV. Ask "Driver" aka Mike Pelchat- he hangs around the Workhorse Chassis forum.

Over the years, I have made all kinds of insulating pads. The best I ever had, which I now use, is 4"x4" treated pieces of wood, about 20-24 inches long. I also feel the rig is more stable with the jacks not being extended near their maximum travel length.

I leave my jacks down for 5-6 months at a time. No "leakdowns" at all.

Good luck,
__________________
Max H,
2002 Newmar Mountain Aire, 37', 3778, W-22, 8.1 Vortac, Ultra Power upgrade, CAI (cold air intake), Taylor wires, colder plugs, Koni shocks.
Max Hubrich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 07:18 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
TerryO's Avatar


 
Entegra Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Midland, Texas
Posts: 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Hubrich View Post
IMHO-
You should always have an insulating buffer between the ground and your jacks-period! This is the route any lightening strike will take, and in the process you can have serious damage without an insulated RV. Ask "Driver" aka Mike Pelchat- he hangs around the Workhorse Chassis forum.

Over the years, I have made all kinds of insulating pads. The best I ever had, which I now use, is 4"x4" treated pieces of wood, about 20-24 inches long. I also feel the rig is more stable with the jacks not being extended near their maximum travel length.

I leave my jacks down for 5-6 months at a time. No "leakdowns" at all.

Good luck,
I understand the theory about insulating against a lightning strike but I think that's kind of been abandoned. The same thinking about your tires insulating you in a car from lightning. If that voltage was able to jump a mile or better thru air why can't it jump 3 1/2" thru or around a 4x4? Myth busters did a segment on it awhile back.
__________________
Terry & Gloria O
Midland, Texas
2012 Entegra Aspire 42RBQ, 2013 Ford Edge
TerryO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 07:37 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
HD4Mark's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Coastal Campers
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Marathon, Florida
Posts: 2,894
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryO View Post
I understand the theory about insulating against a lightning strike but I think that's kind of been abandoned. The same thinking about your tires insulating you in a car from lightning. If that voltage was able to jump a mile or better thru air why can't it jump 3 1/2" thru or around a 4x4? Myth busters did a segment on it awhile back.
I'm no expert but the difference might be that your MH may be connected to shore power providing another path to ground either coming from the pedestal to the earth or vice versa. A surge guard is a good investment. That said we use scrap lumber courtesy of a friend that is a carpenter and Lynx levelers when needed. The lumber breaks eventually but he provides an almost never ending supply.
__________________
Mark & Nancy
2004 Winnebago Vectra 40KD
Shep dog, R.I.P. Kenzie dog Toad 2015 Jeep Wrangler Willys Wheeler
HD4Mark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 08:21 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Max Hubrich's Avatar


 
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Pikeville, NC
Posts: 1,724
Again, IMHO- I'm not an electrical wiz--

I've flown airplanes most of my life, both military and civilian- more than 50 years.

I've flown above, next to, and also directly through thunderstorms (not by choice). When turbine engines are turning 30,000 + RPM's and you take a "strike" you thank the aircraft mfg's for these little hummers-

Aircraft static wick eliminaters,



I understand the term "Static".
But when you have a strike in an airplane the discharge will come out the wings, wing tips, the top of the vertical stablizer, wing roots, etc, and these static wicks. The big fear is, the moment of the strike, is that the engine oil in the bearings (30,000+rpm's) is vaporized and you have just sustained major engine damage. The flash in the cockpit gets your attention enough- You immediately look at your engine instruments and check out your radio's and other avionic equipment.
These static wicks are a "go, no go" decision maker on your pre-flight inspection. Every little thing helps. All aircraft "inflight strikes" require an inspection upon landing and an signed aircraft release by a certified repair station or a mechanic before the aircraft can fly again. I will say, I've also had inflight strikes and didn't even know it (daytime). A mechanic noticed some small burn holes in a wing tip after landing.
A similiar argument is given for "Lighting rods" on structures- do you need them or not?

When I see storm front's coming through my area, I do immediately disconnect shore power from the "pole" and "dry camp". I have even retracted the jacks on occasion if the forecast is really bad.

I know another fellow RV'er that had one during "Katrina" while dry camped with his jacks down and no insulators. He needed a new Converter/inverter (HR DP), new fridge, TV's, etc.

Why give lighting an unimpeded "direct course" to ground?

Good luck,
__________________
Max H,
2002 Newmar Mountain Aire, 37', 3778, W-22, 8.1 Vortac, Ultra Power upgrade, CAI (cold air intake), Taylor wires, colder plugs, Koni shocks.
Max Hubrich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 09:00 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
wa8yxm's Avatar
 
Damon Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 22,829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Hubrich View Post
IMHO-
You should always have an insulating buffer between the ground and your jacks-period! This is the route any lightening strike will take, and in the process you can have serious damage without an insulated RV. Ask "Driver" aka Mike Pelchat- he hangs around the Workhorse Chassis forum.
Let's see. A lightening bolt has traveled through miles of air to reach the ground (Actually it goes the other way as I seem to recall) and you think a couple inches of wood will slow it down.

I don't know where you went to school.. but I suggest you go back and study physics.
__________________
Home is where I park it!
wa8yxm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 09:36 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Max Hubrich's Avatar


 
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Pikeville, NC
Posts: 1,724
I also said IMHO (in my humble opinion)-

Your certainly welcome to yours--

This little note comes from the folks that installed my EMS (Progressive)-



I also like the weight spread the 4x4's give on wet, soggy ground or loose (gravel). Some RV campgrounts won't let you use jacks on asphalt because of summer temps causing softening of the material.
__________________
Max H,
2002 Newmar Mountain Aire, 37', 3778, W-22, 8.1 Vortac, Ultra Power upgrade, CAI (cold air intake), Taylor wires, colder plugs, Koni shocks.
Max Hubrich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 01:34 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
wa8yxm's Avatar
 
Damon Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 22,829
In this (Weight and asphalt) we do agree.

In the campground I'm parked in just now some bright accountant type got the idea to PAVE some of the sites with ashphalt. Many of those blacktop sites have nice big holes in them where some good size Class A dropped his or her jacks and they punched through.

I do have jack pads for those occasions.

I was on one site (These are paved with millings, millings are what you get when they chew up an ashphalt road) and I pushed a 4x4 2 foot long right down into the stuff. That was under the wheels though, My jacks are not pushing as hard as they should.. They are on my "Repair" list.. Not sure when but hopefully early next year. (Summer more than likely)
__________________
Home is where I park it!
wa8yxm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2012, 08:35 PM   #25
Retired Senior Member
 
RonNBama's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,046
Blog Entries: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsheetz View Post
Never ran into this. What is the reason for no plastic?
Not sure what that means but we had some of the stackable plastic squares. First time I put a jack down on then they crushed like a soda can.
__________________
(1984 Barth Regal)
(1998 Monaco Dynasty)
2001 Monaco Executive
RonNBama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2012, 07:54 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
Sutler's Avatar
 
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: GreenValley , Arizona
Posts: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsheetz View Post
Never ran into this. What is the reason for no plastic?
Kind of curious myself about this .
__________________
Tom & Christi Rae Sutler
Freightliner club member
Goodsam club member
IRV2-Supporter
Sutler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2012, 10:24 AM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Indiana
Posts: 78
Blog Entries: 6
I have six 2x10 squares for this purpose. Use them for everything except concrete. I am using them for winter storage over gravel so that the jack plates wont try to freeze to the ground.
__________________

__________________
2014 Keystone Cougar 313RIL.- Bill and Carol Horton
WH347 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
jacks



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.