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Old 12-02-2013, 01:26 PM   #15
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Thank You. I have thought about removing the positive side battery cable only. This is a good reason not to.
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Old 12-02-2013, 02:11 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BULL View Post
I just purchased Ford Focus 2014 and am getting it ready to tow. With all of this battery disconnect I am lost.

With no power how can you operate your Brake Buddy?

Do I understand correctly disconnect negative at post, leave positive alone ?

Thanks
My brake brake is powered from the MH. On the focus I disconnect both battery cables doing the negative first. It takes about 2 minutes. Then I use some battery clamps that connect the MH power to the Focus battery (for charging). Also the MH power is connected to the brake buddy via 12v power socket that came with the brake buddy. If the focus becomes seperated from the MH the focus battery will provide power to the brake buddy. The towing focus brake/blinker lights are seperate from the normal brake/blinker system the focus uses.
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Old 12-05-2013, 12:34 AM   #17
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2014 Ford Focus Battery

I just made my first stop from Austin Tx to the Greater los Angeles area while towing my 2014 Ford Focus (four wheels down) I had the Roadmaster Base Plate with wiring adapter installed and pulling with a Falcon 2 tow bar. Since the Focus is less than 3K lbs., I don’t have to use a Brake Assist system.
OK, now for the disconnecting of the Battery, I found a web site on U Tube “disconnecting a 2014 Ford Focus Battery” I watched the video and did a couple of practice runs on disconnecting the two battery covers. ( I got it down to a science)
Now for the disconnection of the Ground Cable. I used a 10mm socket wrench (you can use the socket or socket wrench) It took me just a few seconds to do this. I left the battery covers off, and will do so until we return. But the whole process takes only 2-3 min. By disconnecting the ground cable and upon reconnecting, everything reset itself i.e.: radio, navigation, my sync, all reset itself.
So with that, we have towed over 1,400 miles and have been driving around LA for a few days and not one single problem. I just followed the MFG instructions.. Now we are on our way to San Diego for a week before heading back to Austin. I will give an update when we return.
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Old 12-05-2013, 01:26 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BULL View Post
I just purchased Ford Focus 2014 and am getting it ready to tow. With all of this battery disconnect I am lost.

With no power how can you operate your Brake Buddy?

Do I understand correctly disconnect negative at post, leave positive alone ?

Thanks
I disconnect the positive terminal. As for operating my Brake Buddy I use a battery jumper. I use the Clore JNC660 which gives me 3 to 5 days of road travel without having to charge it.
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Old 01-16-2014, 09:03 PM   #19
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Wink Disconnect the Focus Negative Battery Cable

I just bought a new tow car, a 2014 Ford Focus Hatchback. Besides having all the nice bells and whistles that we wanted in the Titanium, it has a 6-speed automatic transmission that does not have a torque converter and all the associated hydraulic technology. Instead, it is basically a manual transmission with two electronically controlled clutches—in other words, a computer-controlled manual. I was tired of shifting that 1999 Saturn 5-speed, lol.

So to tow this car, you “trick” the thing into Neutral (per the owner’s manual), then remove all electricity from the car so it can’t possibly engage a clutch or put itself in gear. You know what that would do while under tow! The key to this is, per the Ford manual, to “remove the negative (black) cable” from the battery. If you choose some alternate method, you may subject yourself to unwanted fault codes and need to reprogram some computer-related things each time, nevermind turning the tranny into a blob of melted metal. The down side to this car is the battery position under the hood in front of the driver. There are two covers that snap on over the top; the one nearest the front comes off easily and reveals the positive end of the battery. The back cover is harder to get off (and put back on) because it is tucked under the base of the windshield with not very much room above. Once it is off, you can barely see the negative battery post and cable connection, let alone get a tool and your hands in there. So I’d like to share some tips and a couple of solutions to make this an easy changeover.

As a side note, I would like to add that I installed a Blue Ox baseplate, readily available for this car, and I used a BO taillight wiring kit that does not interact in any way with the factory Ford wiring. One hole was drilled in each of the taillight housings for a lamp socket and the flat 4-color wire cable runs forward to the plug at the front grill. No diodes, no splices, no chance of putting 12V into the Ford that could accidentally activate anything in the transmission!

Before doing anything with the battery, I viewed an excellent video on YouTube which tells you how to remove the covers, retainer, and battery; this write-up presumes you have viewed it, too. You don’t have to remove the battery to get at the negative post in the back, but to release the front of the battery box and pull the battery slightly up and toward you gives you better access. The negative cable end (pictured here) is a complicated battery post clamp with some add-ons including two little wires in a ribbed cable protector that go somewhere unknown.
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After it is off and pulled out into the open on top of the fuse box, you need a 2-gauge 15” top post battery cable (such as a Duralast GT215B at Autozone $8); it has a post clamp on one end and a terminal lug on the other end. Position it on the negative post with the cable exiting toward the rear of the car; you will be able to get a ¼” drive ½” hex socket wrench on the nut to gently tighten it. Route the cable forward and toward the driver’s side through the notch in the top of the side of the battery box and forward out into the open. Secure a conversion post (such as a Lynx 07047 at Autozone $3) to the cable terminal lug using a 3/8-16 x 3/4” bolt and washer. Now you have the battery’s negative post and the complicated negative cable clamp lying on top of the fuse box where they can easily be joined or separated for towing. End of solution 1.
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Solution 2.0: Remove the conversion post from the negative cable; connect the freed terminal lug to one terminal bolt on a battery disconnect switch (such as a Battery Doctor rotary battery switch, about $30 online). Make up a short 2-gauge cable with a terminal lug on both ends; I used another Duralast GT215B, cut off the post clamp and a bunch of cable, and crimped another 2-gauge lug on so that the terminal holes were about 4-1/4” apart. Put the conversion post on one end and connect the other end to the disconnect switch. With the switch OFF, put the complicated connector on the post and gently tighten it. Now you can use the switch to remove or replace the negative cable on the battery. See pictures and good luck.
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Remember to start the engine within 15 minutes of reconnecting the negative cable to the battery!
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Old 01-17-2014, 06:58 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by hdmoxness View Post
The key to this is, per the Ford manual, to “remove the negative (black) cable” from the battery. If you choose some alternate method, you may subject yourself to unwanted fault codes and need to reprogram some computer-related things each time,
So are you saying that if I remove the negative instead of the positive I will not have to reprogram the,radio,clock,USB, auto lock and auto unlock door locks etc.?
I discussed removing the positive with the service guy at Ford due to the almost impossible task of removing the negative. He saw no problem with that as the battery is still totally disconnected. When the positive is disconnected all the settings must be reprogrammed.
I would really like to find out which fuses need to be removed to disable the trans without all the reprogramming and losing the power door locks.
I like the car but not what is involved with tow prep and restore.
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Old 01-17-2014, 08:42 AM   #21
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Exclamation 2014 Ford Focus Battery Disconnect

That's exactly what I am saying. When I hitch the car to the MH, I push the buttons, the brake, and the shift lever inside, just as specified in the owner's manual. Then I release the hood, get out, lock the car, lift the hood, turn the battery switch OFF, and hit the road. At the destination I unlock with a key, release hood, turn battery switch ON, start the car, and unhitch. The Sync system does some kind of a brief maintenance reset or reload on its own and I park the car. The radio presets, clock, auto locks, and everything else are all ready to go and set as before the tow cycle--no reprogramming needed.

I'm confident that disconnecting the positive side of the battery renders the car electrically "dead," and the electronic transmission will stay where it was on disconnect, but there are safety risks and apparently several inconveniences included with this method. One forum contributor I read also checked system fault codes and found several associated with the positive disconnect method. This is one thing us average guys would never see, but your Ford mechanic surely will, and this could lead to embarrassment or possibly service charges for things that could have been avoided by following the owner's manual.

If you watch the video and install a negative post extender cable (solution 1, above), I'll bet your disconnect is even easier than undoing the positive cable. Solution 2 with the switch is even better. I know some enterprising RVer out there will do Solution 3 and put the switch inside the car!

Lyrics by Johnny Mercer, sung by Perry Como:
"You've got to accentuate the positive
Eliminate the negative
And latch on to the affirmative
Don't mess with Mister In-Between"
Tow safe out there....
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Old 01-17-2014, 12:04 PM   #22
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I do not believe the car will hold the presets or keep time without the battery connected. Negative or positive disconnect.
But I am going to test it tomorrow and report back.
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Old 01-17-2014, 04:09 PM   #23
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Smile

Mine holds (or reloads) radio presets, bluetooth phones, previous destinations, & clock time. Climate comes back on auto at 75 degrees. Trip info is reset in the info display. I hope you have similar results!
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Old 01-18-2014, 07:12 PM   #24
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I tried disconnecting the negative today. As I expected, all settings were lost. Just like removing the positive.

I assume you have the keyless starter button. The complete ecm must be different from key models.

I also remember in previous posts that settings were lost.
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Old 01-18-2014, 07:42 PM   #25
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That seems like an important point. If I buy a focus with keyless entry then my setting will go back to the way they were? If so, I think I will purchase that model. By the way....thanks for all the great info!
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Old 01-19-2014, 08:02 AM   #26
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Smile Key or keyless

Thanks, az99, for following up. Sorry to hear your settings still drop. Your analysis is correct, our Focus Titanium does have push-button start/stop. There is no ignition key or keyhole. The so-called "intelligent access key" is a 5-button fob that can just stay in your pocket. There is a physical key clipped into the fob, which is used to unlock the driver's door when there is no power on the car. There is only one keyhole in the whole car!

I hope the info we have exchanged here will help other owners, present and future.
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Old 01-19-2014, 09:47 AM   #27
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Quote:
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I tried disconnecting the negative today. As I expected, all settings were lost. Just like removing the positive.

I assume you have the keyless starter button. The complete ecm must be different from key models.

I also remember in previous posts that settings were lost.
We also have a 2014 with the ignition key. Mine is the same with the radio & clock settings lost. My Blue tooth for the phone seems to stay set ok. I think Ford could have done much better if they were going to make it so it could be towed 4 down. Of course maybe it was made with no thought to being a tow car, it just happened you can tow it. I thought once about reversing the battery in the box to bring the negative terminal forward in the box for easy to disconnect. But no use to do as either terminal being disconnected gives the same results. As for the dangers of disconnecting the positive first just be careful and it helps if you use a dedicated wrench and wrap it with electrical tape leaving only the every end un-taped, you can also use a piece of heat shrink tubing. Any of this will greatly reduce the chance of shorting out the wrench should it come in contact with any body metal.
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Old 01-19-2014, 04:45 PM   #28
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With the poor design of battery placement (for negative disconnect) I think you stand a much better chance of shorting the wrench to the positive terminal while attempting to reach back to the firewall and under the cowl to blindly get a wrench on the negative. There really are no grounds around the positive terminal, it is all plastic.

It would have cost Ford 4 cents in cable to turn the battery around.
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